Peppers

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I just read that spraying Epsom Salt on pepper plants and re applying in 10 days makes a huge difference in the amount and size of the peppers. Spray at flowering time. True? False? MJ
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On Tue, 21 Feb 2012 08:33:20 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

If you have a Magnesium deficiency. If not, there's no real benefit.
Epsom Salts are Magnesium Sufate. Both elemental Magnesium and Sulfur are traces which plants generally desire in some small amount, and if your soil is lacking, applying this would help the plants..
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I am not sure if there is a deficiency, I did not have the soil tested this year. Will it hurt anything? Epsom is cheep
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wrote:

Yet, if ya don't need it, don't use it. That is even cheaper.
http://www.spectrumanalytic.com/support/library/ff/Mg_Basics.htm
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I would really LOVE some great Bell Peppers this year. I have great luck with other kinds but I have yet to grow a great Bell
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On Tue, 21 Feb 2012 09:42:25 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

Perhaps you should get your soil tested. Agricultural Extension offices usually offer these services.
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I have done that every year except this year.
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On Tue, 21 Feb 2012 10:41:09 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"
What have past years' reports indicated about your garden soil needs?
I'm not looking to start a gardening war, but unless I was running a big farm, I don't think I'd bother with yearly soil analysis - perhaps every 5 years if you generally followed the original suggested amendments and weren't doing anything odd in the garden.
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Truth? I don't remember exactly but I never really understood the results and I was in the Master Gardener Program for a while. It was all explained to me and there was never anything very "off" so I guess I kinda stopped paying attention. The county I am in could never get an instructor for the class so it all fell apart. So I rotate my "crops" and use 10 10 10.
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In article

http://www.garden.org/foodguide/browse/veggie/eggplant_care/521 So, before planting, add some organic fertilizer, like dehydrated chicken manure, or any other type of animal manure. You can also work two to four pounds of a balanced fertilizer, such as 10-10-10, into each 100 square feet of soil. The numbers 10-10-10 refer to the percentages, by weight, of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) in the bag of fertilizer. For an extra boost at planting time, put a handful of compost or a teaspoon of 5-10-10, mixed with some soil, into the bottom of the hole and then cover the fertilizer with one to two inches of soil. This protects your plants from getting burned if the roots come into contact with the fertilizer.
------- http://www.coopext.colostate.edu/4dmg/VegFruit/peppers.htm Peppers enjoy an well-amended soil that contains plenty of organic matter, supplemented with a balanced fertilizer or better yet, one with slightly higher nitrogen and phosphorous levels. Place in an area that will receive the most sun and plant 18 inches apart with rows 3 feet apart. ------ http://www.sfc.ucdavis.edu/Research/chili.html Chicken manure (three to four tons per acre) is custom applied a week or more prior to listing. -------- 1 acre = 43,560 sq. ft. 100 sq.ft. = 0.0022956841 acre. 8,000#/acre = 18.37#chicken manure/ 100 sq.ft. Side dress with 11.5#/100 sq.ft. ---------- http://www.ext.vt.edu/departments/envirohort/articles/vegetables/peppers . html When should you fertilize your peppers? Take your choice -- either before planting or throughout the growing season. Little or no difference in yield was seen in a study that compared the effects of slow-release fertilizer applied before planting to soluble nitrogen fertilizer applied several times throughout the season. ------- If your plants don't look robust, or are only a light or pale green, they may be hungry: apply about a tablespoonful of nitrate fertilizer around each plant, /after several blossoms have set./ But don't fertilize blindly--if your plants look healthy enough, let them be, lest they ignore fruiting for vegetative growth. Bell peppers typically produce 7 to 10 peppers a plant, hot peppers more. When to harvest is an interesting question. On the one hand, leaving peppers on the vine till they're completely ripe somewhat reduces the total productivity of the plant; on the other hand, immature peppers are notably less sweet. To us, the choice is clear: let them ripen on the vine. We're not commercial growers: if we want more peppers than our plants produce with the fruits left to fully ripen, we'll grow more plants next season. Peppers are usually picked when they've stopped increasing in size, are firm to the touch, /and have reached their expected color/. Don't pull peppers, because the plant's branches are rather brittle and you can break them that way: harvest by cutting the peppers off. --------- feed after flowering ------
Alfalfa meal: Derived from alfalfa plants and pressed into a pellet form, alfalfa meal is beneficial for adding nitrogen and potassium (about 2 percent each), as well as trace minerals and growth stimulants. Blood meal: This is the powdered blood from slaughtered animals. It contains about 14 percent nitrogen and many micronutrients. Leafy, nitrogen-loving plants, such as lettuce, grow well with this fertilizer. It also reportedly repels deer, but may attract dogs and cats. Bone meal: A popular source of phosphorous (11 percent) and calcium (22 percent), bone meal is derived from animal or fish bones and commonly used in a powdered form on root crops and bulbs. It also contains 2 percent nitrogen and many micronutrients. It may attract rodents. --------------- http://www.plantea.com/manure.htm <http://books.google.com/books?id=4MKtIRwfw6UC&pg=PA131&lpg=PA131&dq=side +dressing,+manure,+peppers&source=bl&ots=QNn4rmxogL&sig=srcp7c6X2z2cED5IO YcDPDHZB50&hl=en&ei=kab8SbztO5GKtgOFs9XpAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result& resnum=8#PPA132,M1> Michigan Gardening Guid -------
N: 18.37 lb. chicken manure/ 100 sq.ft. (2.88 oz/sq.ft.)
P: 3 lb. / 100/sq.ft. (.48 oz/sq.ft.)
K: How much wood ash should you use in your garden? The late Bernard G. Wesenberg, a former Washington State University Extension horticulturist, recommended using one gallon of ashes per square yard on loam to clay-loam soil, and half as much on sandier soils.
You could also lay down some clear plastic sheeting to heat the soil, if temps are a problem, and/or stack bricks or cinder blocks behind them to the north (in N. hemisphere) to radiate heat at night.
Nothing like a fresh picked grilled red pepper (besides fresh tomatoes wrapped in basil, and just picked sweet corn)
--

Billy

E Pluribus Unum
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wrote:

I would really LOVE some great Bell Peppers this year. I have great luck with other kinds but I have yet to grow a great Bell
Order a pkt of "Karma" from Park's, it's the very best bell I've ever grown.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: ...

how are you growing them?
we have very little trouble growing them here. once in a while a tomato worm or a bit of rot.
full sun, heavy soil, no mulch, no fertilizer other than buried organic materials, planted after the soil is warm.
10-10-10 might encourage leaf production but not much else. try laying off that for green peppers.
songbird
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OMG Bird!!!.... really?
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Uh, the first 10 in 10-10-10 (nitrogen) will encourage leaf production. I know you know that, but it may not be apparent to others.
--

Billy

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billy's political BS snipped
One of the birds wrote:

Some folks are misrepresenting science here. N is essential to keep the plant growing and in good health. While excess N may encourage foliage at the expense of fruit in certain conditions, it is still required by the plant, even in the flowering/fruiting phase.
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Billy wrote:

still waiting for an answer...
...

yes, thanks, mistyped there.
and i do not dispute that a pepper plant needs some nitrogen, but it can be the case that too much nitrogen encourages too much leaf production. but it could also be the case that the OP is doing something else that isn't helping the suitation.
songbird
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I am not doing anything special to grow them. As I said I have used 10 10 10 in the past but I guess I won't be doing that anymore. Makes sense now that some of the peppers from last year were really small. These were not bell peppers. In fact if anyone is interested, the peppers came from Sams. Sams sells a bag of yellow, red and orange peppers that are great. I planted the seeds from them and have been growing them for about 3 years now.
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In article

Don't fertilize after it flowers.
--

Billy

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(Non gardening and Fringe Political BS snipped)
Just more Old wife's tales not supported by any real science billy.
It isnt what people dont know that hurts them. Its what they do know that just aint so." Will Rogers
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: ...

you might be using seeds from a hybrid variety and that can cause the sort of thing you are experiencing here.
for a few $ get some seeds from a known source. well worth eliminating that variable from the equation.
if i had some here i would send them to ya. :)
songbird
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