OT heads up- long

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Herbal Legacy subscribers, it is time to take action! Last week the Senate passed a bill (S.510 FDA Food Safety Modernization Act) that massively increases the scope of what the FDA can do. Dr. Shiv Chopra had this to say about the bill:
"If accepted [S 510] would preclude the public's right to grow, own, trade, transport, share, feed and eat each and every food that nature makes . It will become the most offensive authority against the cultivation, trade and consumption of food and agricultural products of one's choice. It will be unconstitutional and contrary to natural law or, if you like, the will of God."
The bill goes to the House of Representatives, and it is important for you to contact your Representative now to stop this bill from becoming law!
Citizens for Health is making it easy for you to contact your representative - just visit:
http://salsa.democracyinaction.org/o/750/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEYR85
enter your zip code and it will bring up a letter that you can read and edit and will be sent directly to your representative.
If you would like more information before sending the e-mail, here is a link to a summary of the bill, followed by an article about the bill:
http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=s111-510&tab=summary
When it comes to S. 510, the question that you need to ask yourself is this....
Do you trust the FDA?
If not, then there are some very real reasons for you to be concerned.
The following are 12 reasons why S. 510 could be absolutely disastrous for small food producers and for the U.S. economy....
#1 All food production facilities in the United States will be required to register with the U.S. government. No food will be allowed to be grown, distributed or sold outside this bureaucratic framework unless the FDA allows it.
#2 Any food that is distributed or sold outside of U.S. government control will be considered illegal smuggling.
#3 The FDA will hire an army of new inspectors to enforce all of the new provisions in the bill.
#4 The FDA will be mandated to conduct much more frequent inspections of food processing facilities.
#5 The fees and paperwork requirements will be ruinously expensive for small food producers and organic farms.
#6 Senate Bill 510 would place all U.S. food and all U.S. farms under the Department of Homeland Security in the event of a major "contamination" or an "emergency". What exactly would constitute a "contamination" or an "emergency" is anyone's guess.
#7 S 510 mandates that the FDA facilitate harmonization of American food laws with Codex Alimentarius.
#8 S 510 imposes an annual registration fee on any facility that holds, processes, or manufactures food. It also includes draconian fines for paperwork infractions of up to $500,000 for a single offense. Just one penalty like that would drive a small food producer out of business.
#9 S. 510 would give the FDA tremendous discretion to regulate how crops are grown and how food is produced in the United States. Basically, small farmers and organic farmers will now be forced to farm exactly how the federal government tells them to. It is feared that the U.S. government would soon declare that many organic farming methods are "unsafe" and would outlaw them. In addition, there is the very real possibility that at some point the U.S. government could decide that the only "safe" seed for a particular crop is genetically modified seed and would require all farmers to use it.
#10 S 510 will give the FDA the power to impose a quarantine on a specific geographic area. Basically the FDA would have the power to stop the movement of all food in an area where a "contamination" has been identified. This would be very close to being able to declare martial law.
#11 S 510 will give the FDA the power to conduct warrantless searches of the business records of small food producers and organic farmers, even if there has been no evidence at all that a law has been broken.
#12 Opponents of S. 510 believe that it would eliminate the right to clean and store seed. Therefore, control of the U.S. seed supply would be further centralized in the hands of Monsanto and other multinational corporations.
As mentioned above, this bill gives the FDA a ton of discretion. It is written very broadly and very vaguely. It opens the door for all kinds of abuses, but that doesn't mean that the FDA will behave unreasonably.
Article Source: http://www.truthistreason.net/senate-bill-510-may-be-the-most-dangerous-bill-in-the-history-of-the-us
Please take a minute and contact your representative today:
http://salsa.democracyinaction.org/o/750/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEYR85
Yours in the Natural State! Dr. Karl D. Buchanan
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As I understand it, the USDA is charged with facilitating farm sales, and the FDA with consumer protection. The USDA has far greater funding than does the FDA. Presently, if there is reason to believe that food products are tainted, e,g. rat shit in the peanuts, melamine and cyanuric acid replacing high protein flour, or salmonella on eggs, they can only request that the responsible party voluntarily recall their product. Under the new bill, the FDA could unilaterally issue a recall. I find this a reason to support the bill.

Having read the summary and watched the two videos at <http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=s111-510&tab=summary I can say that the above description by Dr. Shiv Chopra is completely false. The FDA would be, if the bill passes, charged with setting regulations. These regulations may be objectionable or not, however they can't be judged until they are written.
Sen. Jon Tester (D-MT) has proposed amendments that would exempt small producers that sell to the public, hotels, and restaurants from regulations. Whether this is for stainless steel kitchens, or simply testing, I don't know. At some level, regulations would seem pointless, e.g. produce given or swapped with neighbors, or local sales for less than $5,000. Stainless steel kitchens would be beyond the financial abilities of small producers, but testing based on units produced would be fairer.
As far as raw milk, and raw almonds, it seems that if they were subject to inspection, had a government warning sticker, and and full disclosure of their production, an adult should be able to buy them using their own best judgement.
In any event, until now the USDA has been in control and has fought slaughter house, and peanut producer inspections. I realize that giving the FDA expanded authority will just make them a target for lobbyists, but since the system as it exists now isn't functioning I would favor letting the FDA try to protect the consumer.
My liberal reflex is that suppressing this bill (S-510) would maintain the status quo to the advantage of mass producers whose business organizations lobby Congress.
I don't have all the answers, so I hope this opinion will generate further comment.
Recommended reading: Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition, and Health, Revised and Expanded Edition (California Studies in Food and Culture) by Marion Nestle <(Amazon.com product link shortened) 520254031/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid44222934&sr=1-2> ISBN-10: 0520254031

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- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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When I first read about Testers's amendment, I have decided to be for the bill. However, I am sure the bill will not help the consumer one bit and not improve the food safety at all. It is the skeptic in me. Somewhere along the line big Corp will gut the bill.
My understanding, small farms and farmers markets are exempt from FDA and USDA inspections unless something has gone wrong. Thanks to Sen. Tester.
In my state of Michigan, one can purchase a cow directly from a farmer. The farmer will take it to a local license deer processor to have it processed. The deer processors usually butcher them in their home garage. Just like the Pailins Alaska butchering a Caribou in their garage.
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Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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Good chance it would be cleaner than one cleaned on a conveyor belt. Packing house employees seem to be an at risk group, when it comes to carpal tunnel syndrome (repetitive motion).
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Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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Going verbose on me? Uh-huh.
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Billy wrote:

I don't have a dog in this fight but where the USA goes Oz often follows so I had to check it out.
I found the interpretation of the critics to be quite alarming so I had to look at the source document to see what they were on about. Here it is:
http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname 1_cong_bills&docid=f:s510es.txt.pdf
Not wanting to spend hours on a 300 page document I followed just one thread of commentary about the bill preventing seed saving and exchange. The bill says nothing explicitly about the issue, seeds are not mentioned. The critics construct a long chain of interpretation that starts from provisions to maintain suitable conditions in food processing facilities and ends up with total control of all seeds. This is extreme paranoia.
If you want to see the symptoms of someone sucked up by a tornado who will never see Kansas again look here:
http://foodfreedom.wordpress.com/2009/06/13/seeds-how-to-criminalize-them /
If this the best they can do I wonder about the quality of the rest of their analysis. Is there is any more balanced and reasonable commentary out there? I am not saying that this bill is totally benign but the case being made against it here is very poor.
I cannot imagine why this is headed OT. If goverment control of seeds isn't on topic what is?
David
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not facts.
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No problem "we" were able to get it right. I thought the site http://www.truthistreason.net/ was a tip off especially the recommended list of sites. Sort of a wingnut alert which I saved just to see what they are up too. I'm in the process of cataloguing my saved seeds and marking my early catalogues with seeds of interest. Found OCA Oxalis tuberosa said to be a lost Inca tuber. A late fall baby potato like plant. This found in Nichols.
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

Daniel Moynihan and Dennis Kucinich in 2012 !
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Found OCA Oxalis tuberosa said to

'Lost'????? It's grown commercially in NZ where it is known as NZ yam. http://www.garden-nz.co.nz/grow-your-own/grow-your-own/yams-grow-your-own.html
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Farml do you know of any other lost vegetables ?
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

Daniel Moynihan and Dennis Kucinich in 2012 !
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I wonder if Colorado Potato bugs eat them ??
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

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The only one that garden magazines regularly put into that group would be the Wollemi Pine, however, since no-one except maybe at a pinch, a lost Aboriginal knew it might perhaps have ever existed, I wouldn't even include that as being 'lost'. It was just never known by anyone in the western world until 'discovered'.
I don't think any plants are ever lost except in the case of species extinction. Plants in certain cultures might be unknown, but that is not the same thing as 'lost'.
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semantics
plural noun [usu. treated as sing. ] the branch of linguistics and logic concerned with meaning. There are a number of branches and subbranches of semantics, including formal semantics, which studies the logical aspects of meaning, such as sense, reference, implication, and logical form, lexical semantics, which studies word meanings and word relations, and conceptual semantics, which studies the cognitive structure of meaning.
the meaning of a word, phrase, sentence, or text : such quibbling over semantics may seem petty stuff. DERIVATIVES semantician |?s?man?ti sh ?n| noun semanticist noun
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

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Sigh!
You asked a dumb question. I tried to give a response in unambiguous English but it seems that didn't work so I'll put it another way.
How would I know of any "OTHER LOST" vegetables when I never knew that oca was supposed to be 'lost' in the first place.
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http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id 98
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

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Very cool book! I just wish it weren't so darned expensive.
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Amazon has it for $42 and your library should be able to get it too. Sometimes off the wall ventures in usenet lead to gold.
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

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wrote in message

may have seeds. Thanks for the heads up Bill! Steve
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Then you might also be interested in Lost Crops of Africa: Volume I, II, and III. <(Amazon.com product link shortened) sim_b_1>
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