is this the weed that's been popping up?

Hi again,
I have this thing popping up in my garden now, and I think it's Cotton Morningglory (Ipomoea cordatotriloba for all you picky folks. -_-) At least, based on this picture: http://www.ppws.vt.edu/scott/weed_id/ipott.htm I'm not really in the area this thing is supposed to grow in tho . . .
The sprouts I'm seeing look like that however, but I have yet to see a real leaf (like on the pic there.) What are the chances that this is some kind of other plant? Is the first pair of leaves always enough to tell a plant from others? (Within the same genus?) And I thought those things were the seeds I planted. . . . Sigh.
Are the any resourses, paper or digital, that you would recommend for identifying unwanted plants?
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Liashi said:

If the cotyledons (seed leaves) look like that, it could be one of several 'morning glory' species. You would have to wait for the true leaves, and might even have to wait for the vine or flowers to clinch the ID.

With new-to-you plants that are directly seeded into the garden, it's very useful to sprout some in sterile potting soil first so you can see what the sprouts look like. That will help you differentiate them from almost all of the weeds that might turn up in the garden.

I've used everything from a field guide to wildflowers (in which almost every weed you find will turn out to be 'alien' to North America) to the Internet.
One place I have bookmarked is: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/weeds_common.html
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
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Now wshy didn't I think of that . . . :)

This looks nice, and I hadn't seen it yet. Thanks much! (For your suggestions and info!)
--Liashi
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Liashi) wrote in message

I've got those little buggers popping up all OVER my garden. I've been wondering what they are, too, especially since they weren't there last year.
Since I know they're morning glories, I'll transplant some of them to the side of my garden shed and let them grow up the trellis there. Oughtta be pretty.
Mark
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:) My Mom planted them last year, but I guess they grow wild to then. Had to pull one plant due to limited space, but I moved the other two over into an empty spot. (I have more trouble with grass growing in there than anything else.) So if it's not grass, why not keep it? But I'll prolly watch to be sure it doesn't go to seed on me.... Hey, I'm in my garden almost every day. Wouldn't want an infestation next year.
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On 27 May 2004 09:10:42 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net (Mark) wrote:

Noooooooooo don't do it!! If you did not plant morning glories, and let them go to seed, in a specific area, and you have these all over the yard, they're probably not something you want growing in your yard, like BINDWEED.. weed morning glories...cute little white blossoms, spread like wildfire, seem to be perennial, have roots that seem to grow to the core of the earth! They do not kill easily once they're past the seedling stage as the roots store energy and you just do NOT want them in your yard, don't take the chance that what you're letting grow is a weed, if you want morning glories that are "tame" spend a buck or two and buy some seeds, nick the coat a bit soak them and plant them, then you'll KNOW it's not a weed before you've let it take hold!
Strangling morning glories aka bindweed, is the one thing the chickens couldn't effectively kill even after they'd killed blackberries, and raspberries! It would grow up in the middle of the thorny gooseberry bush canes to escape the chickens, so even after letting the chickens completely have the yard for the year, while it killed many weeds and fertilized the yard, and it's amazing how chicken feet can completely compact the top of the soil, being that it has a fair clay percentage, sealed the surface of the soil. I would go out and dig for the chickens and to break up that seal on the surface. All I had to do was show the chickens the shovel and they'd made the connection shovel = worms! One in particular would RUN like mad when she saw it and would follow that shovel wherever it went!
Anyway.. just one viewpoint on those "morning glories" .. Don't doooo it! ;-)
Janice
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snipped-for-privacy@removethistoreply.yahoo.com writes:

While my soil doesn't compact with the chickens (instead it is beautifully "disturbed"), I have the same experience with my chickens . . . they come running when they see the shovel or even the rake. Also, if I move *anything*, they are right there to see what goodies will appear. The ladies are soooo funny.
Last weekend, when the load of steer manure was delivered, the ladies were in heaven as they started scratching for corn and bugs. Without doubt, they were the happiest chickens in the county, perhaps the state! LOL
Yesterday, while I was unloading barkdust out front, the ladies got out. I had forgotten to securely fasten the gate after dropping off two bales of straw in back, going to go back and do it after parking the truck. Neighbors saw them and told me. I had my back to them and was concentrating on unloading barkdust . . . *and* they were quiet. It was like they knew what mischief makers they were! Six of them were waddling around the front yard, slowly making their way toward me. Thankfully, they were the only ones out and stayed together as well as being very cooperative about going back down the alley and into the RV gate! Maybe they were feeling neglected and wanted to let me know. LOL. One neighbor, about to leave for work, came over to help . . . he is a county deputy sheriff! These chickens are probably the only ones chased by a deputy, at least in our town. <g>
Pets can be so much fun! These chickens have been great entertainment as well as producing yummy eggs.

I so agree with Janice's thoughts on this!!!

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Alright, alright. :) My Dad lost his job recently, so now we're not allowed to buy "luxury" items such as plants. If only my parents could see what my mind has turned the backyard into. So I'll pull them them. Can they be put in a compost pile, or are they too dangerous for that? :)
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On 1 Jun 2004 13:13:42 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Liashi) wrote:

If they are seedlings, and you let them dry out enough that they're DEAD sure, if they're old roots coming up again, those roots are not good in the compost bin unless you do run a hot one and they get thoroughly cooked.. yeah those fleshy roots.. aren't good to put in there, and they could grow!
Janice
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