Home Gardening Becomes Even More Imperative

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Full article at:
http://www.commondreams.org/archive/2007/05/27/1485 /
Battle for Biofuels Drives World Food Prices Higher

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Charlie wrote:

Yeah, growing food for cars MAY be immoral.
Carl
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to reply, change ( .not) to ( .net)

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Makes sense doesn't it. Convert food stocks, grown on arable land easily devoted to a variety of uses, to fuel. Use almost as much energy to make the fuel as the fuel actually yields. Yep, makes sense to me.
making bio-diesel from sewerage waste. Will not meet our current fuel usage but can go some way to meeting current demand, uses a waste (shit) to make a fuel and does not lock up arable land (grows on sewerage ponds). Moreover it cleans the water. http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/SC0605/S00030.htm?CFID 36936&CFTOKENg777452
grain production vs consumption
http://www.fas.usda.gov/grain/circular/2006/05-06/graint2.gif
rob
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<Charlie> wrote in message > Full article at:

And farmer's income and our cars are of primary importance of course. Our mouths and stomachs take second fiddle. Point taken.
Question. Where are the bees? Another part of the equation eventually driving us to starvation. Think bigger than just the things mentioned. Who and what and why stands to gain from this? Dave
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Corn is petroleum intensive. See book "Omnivore's Dilemma".
- Bill Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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Charlie expounded:

Is the US government still paying farmers to *not* grow crops?
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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Yes. Something that escapes lawmakers and the judicial system is that the U.S. paid farmers to grow tobacco in early 60s in the form of a farming subsidy. I won't forget it. Dave
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Charlie, It appears that the "New Deal" for farmers was laid to rest in the 70s after it had been whittled at for a generation. The original deal was where the government would loan the farmer money to hold the crop off the market until prices went higher. If they didn't go higher, the government kept the crop and they called it even. The reasoning being that it was in the nations interest to lay away food for bad time and to support the farmers who grew it. In the 1970s the above got changed to price supports. The government decided what a fair price was and paid the farmer the difference. Thing is as the government determined price has dropped, farmers raise more to cover expenses, causing in turn a lowering if price supports. By now the farmer gets about 4 cents to the dollar for their crop, uh, commodity.
The main benefactors of the commodity price collapse for corn is Archer Daniel Midlands and, Cargill.
The price collapse realy started in the 50s with the introduction of chemical fertilizers. Previously, farmers had used crop rotation and manure to invigorate their land. Now there is no need for crop rotation, meaning more corn and lower prices.
According to Michael Pollard's book,"Omnivore's Delimma" http://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2006/04/11_pollan.shtml it takes a little over 1 petroleum calorie to produce 1 calorie of edible corn (pg. 46, 1st paragraph). There is the possibility of using the entire plant by converting the cellulose back to sugar but I don't know what energy investment that would entail.
Funny thing though, before using crop rotation and farm manure, you got 2 food calories out for everyone put in and the environment was a hell of a lot healthier.
How you making out with your clay?
- Bill Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
P.S. Jan I wish I had known that this book was continuation from Pollard's previous book, "The Botany of Desire". Damn, this is turning into a serious amount of summer reading.
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wrote:

And until this point, much af what was produced on the farm remained on the farm. I can't recall the percentage of produce that left the farm, but it was fairly low.
Nearly every forty or eighty had a farm and family. Most, if not all of the family food was produced and processed on the farm.
Stock was taken to a local or regional processing plant and was processed and distributed to local stores. Stores sold local eggs and produce, in season. You see what we have now. People were trying to make a living and life for their families and communities, not trying to become quadrazillionaires.
I well remember the taste of real pork and beef, real eggs and real milk. Ever notice how pork and chicken kinda taste the same nowadays?
Back in the fifties and sixties, the local farmers also provided good summer jobs for us kids. Before Monsanto, we walked bean fields, cutting out the weeds. We made hay all summer.
Now there is little work for our young, even less meaningful work. Gardening can be return to this, a reconnection with the natural world and the natural rhythms of life. To the quietness of nature and mind the working the dirt can bring.

Ha! Always one to make me think, aincha? I am holding off to see some results on my friends pastures and research a bit more.

Care Brudda Charlie
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[...]

Some of us are still doing that. There are three gals right here in my little neighborhood who sell our eggs. About 50 dozen eggs a week, between the three of us, and we can't meet our market demand.
A couple of gals sell raw milk, but do it very quietly, because it's not legal in this state to sell it.
Another neighbor is a truck farmer and a founding mother of our local Farmers Market, which has grown exponentially in 5 years.
And all of my Old Believer Russian neighbors grow a huge amount of the food they need for the year. Literally tons of spuds; cabbage; carrots; broccoli; lots of beets (for borscht), etc. (Lots of food crops thrive in our cool Alaskan summers.) They all have greenhouses -- typical size is ~20'x30', although one neighbor just built a new one that's at least 40' long. (I'm very jealous...)
Those families average 12 children each. The kids help with the garden, the milk cows, the chickens (meat & egg), the horses, goats and other assorted & sundry animals. The kids also go out commercial fishing with their dads & uncles, and they go hunting in the fall for moose & caribou. The kids grow up with a real understanding of where their food comes from and how to make it all happen.

We can't get "American" kids to work on the ranch, doing haying. The Russian kids are happy for the work. I've never heard a single whimper or whine, bucking square bales.

We sell our composted cow manure like crazy this time of year. The organic truck farmers and my Russian neighbors buy it.
We started selling the cow poop simply because we're always broke in May. I needed money to pay the light bill & the phone bill. Now we sell I don't know how many tons of it every spring : )
Jan in Alaska Zone 3 and time to plant-out, right after this full moon (we have snow in the forecast for tomorrow night)
--
Bedouin proverb: If you have no troubles, buy a goat.

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Whoa.....are you alive? Is this post originating from heaven?
Hello, is this god speaking? Is this a vision of the afterlife?
Seriously now.....
Charlie, to whom the angel spoke
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Thank you, Bill, but....I am not Charlie :o)
(I asked the question, not Charlie)
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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In article

[...]

Bill:
I haven't read the second book yet. The first one is a pretty fast read, but I read fast...
The chapter about tulips is fascinating, as well as the reason why Johnny Appleseed planted apples all over the place. To folks who haven't read the book, he was planting apple trees to produce apples to make hard cider. A man after my own heart.
Jan
--
Bedouin proverb: If you have no troubles, buy a goat.

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Charlie was forced to post this in: rec.gardens

Excerpt from article:
"Almost a quarter of this years US corn crop is expected to be turned into fuel. Drought in Australia has added to the food prices spike, which is feeding through to world inflation."
I swear to Gawd I'd be much happier if we went back to the horse and buggy days.
Michael
--
This is how it works in my house. Click the pic to enlarge it:
http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=42ko0mf
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Bikes and well designed mass transit would help. Meanwhile anyone know what a window quilt is ?
http://www.windowquilt.com /
Bill who has a few about his home but has two cars in the drive way. May go back to one like 1967.
--

S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade
http://www.ocutech.com/ High tech Vison aid
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In article < snipped-for-privacy@sn-indi.vsrv-sjc.supernews .net>,

Rednecks use aluminum foil...
<G>
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Peace, Om

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But it still takes "fuel" to feed the horse. <G>
Can't win can we?
Wonder what the mpb (mile per bushel) for horses is?
I still don't understand why biofuel is being manufactured from food instead of waste! There are tons and tons of weeds and corn STALKS that can be used instead. Wheat straw, millet, milo and sorghum straw (hell any stalks left over from ANY grain crops) as well as the non-edible tops from root crops.
All it really takes is digestible cellulose.
What am I missing here?
A bit of BS perhaps?
Speaking of BS, methane can also be compressed and used as a liquid fuel and heaven knows there is enough sh** being produced!
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Peace, Om

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wrote:

into
buggy
I am involved with a client that is breaking in to the biofuel world. They have perfected a process that turns meat-processing sludge (they are working primarily with chicken plant sludge which is basically everything that is left over at the end of the production run) into the appropriate amino acid base for a biofuel blend. This sludge is run through a *cleaning* process which has a yield rate of roughly 80% usable material to garbage and then it is refined which drops the final yield another 10%. The end product is then blended with diesel at varying rates depending on the needs of the final consumer. It's an up and coming industry and they are very secretive about the processes, etc so I don't have any idea what kind of energy use is required to render the final product, but was told that the rendering process does require more work than does Palm or Corn (the 2 most prolific oil bases currently used) , but that overall, their cost per gallon is quite a bit less due the to cost of raw material and transportation vs the other 2. (Most of the Palm oil is shipped in from Africa and there is not as great a density in farms producing corn for fuel as compared to the relatively high density iseen n the poultry processing areas.
KW

Nicholson
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"KW" <keith_warrennospamatallteldotnet> wrote:

Chicken plant sludge? We call that sausage. There is nothing left over. Nothing but the horrid smell of a charnel house. Even the feathers are feed to cows for protein. The way this works is that cattle and chickens are basically corn, because corn is cheap. The corn in turn is based on petroleum (fertilizer, insecticides and fuel for the tractor) that is owned by people who hate us because we are trying to take it away from them (and have been since [1953?], when we sent Kermit Roosevelt (CIA) to Iran to over throw the legally elected government of Dr. Mohammed Mosaddeq and install our ruthless puppet the Shah. [ and people wonder why they don't like us]). I presume that this isn't a pitch and, that you are just trying to pass along information, for which I appreciate the thought, BUT you don't make biodiesel from amino acids. You make protein from amino acids and, fuel from carbohydrates, like sugar or, hydrocarbons, like oil.
Your friend might want to get his money back. Bush SAYS he is pushing for fuel cells.
- Bill Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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wrote:

Looks like the price of beef is going to skyrocket, if'ns we feed both the corn and chickenshit/feathers to our cars.
Holy shit, horrid doesn't even describe it. I've driven by these places, in southern MO and northern ARK. In our end of the state someone is always fighting with, and usually losing to, the pork producers and the state. Premium Farms has emptied a large part of a neighboring county with the stench and pollution. I shit you not, if you even walk in one of those buildings for a few seconds, the reek is nigh on impossible to remove from your skin and clothing. I don't give a crap what they claim and "verify", they are destroying large areas of the environment, let alone the independent producers, of which there are few left. Money talks and pigshit reeks.
There would be a whole lot less fast food eaten if people could drive by and see and smell these places. Tyson? Hormel? Patooie.

*snork*
Charlie
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