Help: are these really persimmons?

I bought a persimmon tree years ago as an ornamental, (I'm in BC, Canada, near the 49th paralel, so its fruit would not ripen here).
The tree produces a heavy crop each year, but my "persimmons" don't look much like the ones I occasionally see in stores. Here is a link to a high-res photo:
http://www.oldstox.com/images/persimmons.jpg
The fruit are pear-shaped, heavy and firm, and have a downy fuzz over a yellow skin. Are they indeed a variety of persimmon? Thanks for any help.
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They look more like quinces. do they have a strong scent (uncut - just from the fruit sitting on the bench)? If they do, then I'd say that they're quinces. BTW, coul dyou use a lower resolution if you have to ask a question in the future and post a pic? It took so long to download on my steam operated, dial up line computer that I nearly didn't bother.
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True, but, the quince that I am familiar with is a shrub, not a tree. usually lurking, Linda H. USA zone 5b
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brafield wrote:

Those are quinces not a persimmons. They are hard and close to inedible when raw but excellent when cooked . When they are full yellow or the leaves start to fall (whichever comes first) pick them, peel, core, slice and stew with sugar and a little water. The flesh will turn from off white to pink and they will become aromatic. Serve with a splash of cream or icecream. There are many more elaborate recipes for quince deserts mainly from the middle east. If you don't like them email them to me.
The quince is one of my favourite fruit trees. It is a handsome and hardy tree that grows in a wide range of climates and needs little attention. In spring the flowers are quite pretty, fairly large and more durable than many. In summer the leaves cloak the tree most attractively. In autumn the fruit are divine.
Every garden needs a quince tree.
David
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Thank you for your help, everyone. Yes, everything points to quinces, and I have double checked on Google for pics; though how I came to buy the tree as a 'persimmon' I'll never know!
I'm glad to know the fruit is edible if cooked, because the only time I bit one I hated it --- oddly the flowers don't have a particularly nice aroma either.
Too late for this year --- yesterday I had to strip the tree and throw away the fuit because my annual visitor, a very fat black bear, spent the night in my garden causing havoc and pooping prolifically. Last year he ripped off one big branch.
Thanks again.
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On Mon, 16 Nov 2009 09:52:12 -0800 (PST), brafield

Hmmmm.........I wonder how bear poo rates as fertilizer? ;-)
Charlie
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brafield wrote:

I don't know anybody who eats them raw.
oddly the flowers don't have a particularly

The smell of the tree and the fruit is more debateable. Mine don't seem to have much smell at all yet some say it is very strong.

At least rabbits and kangaroos don't climb trees. I do have to net mine to keep off the bats, parrots, bower birds and possums.
David
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The fruit will last for weeks before cooking so there was probably no need to just throw it out.
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Amen to that. Magnificent things are quinces.
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