Edible or not?

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wrote:

I would assume he brought the book to show David a reliable reference and used it to point out important things to look for. As a teacher, not just an "expert."
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USA
North Carolina Foothills
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The Cook wrote:

Bingo!
He was explaining the difference between the edible and false Morels.
--

David Farber
Los Osos, CA
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You might find <http://thegreatmorel.com/index.shtml useful too. If you are a first time hunter, you should make your first hunting expedition with someone who knows what a good morel looks like.
There are several types of morels, some edible and others poisonous.
The woods will dole out many types of fungi to the hunter, therefore, The Great Morel recommends that all shroomers - rookies and veterans alike visit Edible and Poisonous Mushroom Page by Barbara Bassett, Naturalist. This site has great images of the good, the bad and the uglies! Click here for other great sources of morel identification as well as make sure to visit The Great Morel's page on the false morel.
<http://thegreatmorel.com/disclaim.html Warning: some mushrooms are poisonous, even deadly. Henceforth the content of this said web site and its context shall be used as information and each visitor from hereafter shall take it upon themselves to exercise extreme caution. This said website and its contents make no representation, and it does not offer sufficient information for a totaly safe mushroom hunt because some mushrooms are poisonous, even deadly.
It is the sole responsibility of visitors to this site to postively identify their own morels. The Great Morel site is not intended to be a morel identification guide and takes no reponsibilty in mis-indentifying morels. Visitors must understand that consumption of some mushrooms may be harmful, and or fatal.
Discard all preconceived beliefs and remember the information herein maybe be questionable, is not all factual, and any assuredness created from the reading of this said web site should be reviewed because some mushrooms are poisonous and can even be deadly.
Therefore extreme heedfulness and circumspection shall be taken in any pursuit of the great morel mushoom (morchella). Any misconstrued notions gathered from said content is the responsibility of the visitor and therfore constitutes neglect of said visitor for inability to recognize some mushrooms are poisonous, even deadly.
--

We only get one life, so I believe. We all need to determine the amount
of caution that we need to protect it. There are the known knowns, the
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David Farber said:

Looks a little "off" to me. I wouldn't eat it unless I'd had it verified by an expert. The top is too small and the base is a bit too filled in.
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Pat in Plymouth MI

"Yes, swooping is bad."
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prime to be a good edible. Slice them all and dehydrate them. Once you get your "positive" ID you can eat them.
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Those are indeed morels, but it would seem to be the wrong time of year for them in CA. My hunting partners & I have picked over 2000 this year. The ones you have are probably Morchella esculenta, although that name may be in error as they are a European species. We are rapidly discovering that many of the N. American fungi that were given European names are not the same mushroom.
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Also be aware that fungi can concentrate poisons, heavy metals in particular. If your garden is treated heavily with chemicals, I wouldn't advise eating them.
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David Farber;957425 Wrote: > I found these mysterious things growing in my garden. The internet says >

> like

>

> (http://tinyurl.com/73859wa )

My favorite is hunting Morel mushrooms. They only grow in the spring, from about mid March to mid May, and they are a wonderful treat that can be cooked in a number of different ways and make the perfect side dish or topper for most meals. Morels have a wonderful strong flavor that cannot be compared with any other food, whether fungal or not. After cleaning and slicing each mushroom it is time to cook them. There are many recipes and preferred methods for doing this. Among my favorites is to either sautee' them in butter, salt, pepper and garlic. Or the most common way to cook them is to batter and fry them.
--
allen73


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On Sun, 29 Apr 2012 11:02:32 -0700, "David Farber"

In another newsgroup, this would be called a 'Gloat' -- and my response would be "You suck".<g>
Sure look like morels from here. I had some in my yard *once* 20 yrs ago. Best mushrooms ever-- And they never returned.
Cut the stems, don't pluck them. Dry them, fry them, enjoy them.
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote: ...

take a few and soak them in cool water overnight.
go out and dig a trench off to the side someplace you don't mind not mowing for a bit if mushrooms appear.
take some fruitwood sprinkle it with the water you've soaked morels in. bury. wait. hope.
my bro hunts morels in the woods, takes his water from cleaning them and dumps it outside. now has morels in his yard.
i took some water from morels and dumped it out here in several locations last year, but i suspect it will take more than one year for the fungal mass to be large enough to fruit. if it actually does something that would be great...
songbird
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It is thought that at least some morels are mycoryzal, so pour your cleaning water near trees they associate with. Here in the Southern Appalachians those trees are tulip poplar, ash and apple. We don't have elms here, but morels are known to associate with same. There has been some success cultivating black morels on the west coast in Douglas fir chips.
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Notably Michal Pollan's mushroom hunting adventure that took place along I-50, from Sacramento to South Shore (Tahoe), after a forest fire in a predominately pine and fir forest.
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E Pluribus Unum

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songbird wrote:

Has anyone anywhere ever managed to grow morel deliberately? I have never heard of any.
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Yes, there are many kits available, but they are only about 30% successful. The most successful are the kits for the "burn site" morels. The process involves layering ash and charcoal along with the spawn. Do a "Google" search for morel kits, I believe you'll find quite a few.
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