Drought resistant stuff

My garlic chives, tomatillo, malabar spinach, lettuce, and rosemary are doing great without watering. Also the volunteer tomatoes are producing well.
Only my peppers gets watered regularly.
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Inspiring. I aspire to a garden which is planned around the amount of rainfall we get, but it doesn't always work out that way.
Our tomatillo gets some watering (and droops a bit). Our lettuce mostly died (partly due to neglect :-)) a while ago. Our tomatoes probably would be greener with more water (as it is they are dying back and not producing a whole lot of new fruit, but hopefully will perk up in the fall a bit).
But the rosemary, basil, mint, oregano, lemon verbena, strawberries, okra, raspberries, paw paw, apple, and probably some others I'm forgetting to mention, don't seem to need watering.
Here in Maryland we're at a D2 (severe) drought, according to http://www.drought.unl.edu/dm/monitor.html . This is usually a dry (and hot) time of year. But this year is drier than usual.
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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com writes: [snip]

You have paw paw! Though I have one (and what is left of another the neighbor broke off), it is still a ways away from producing. Are the fruits worth the wait?
Glenna
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According to what I have read, you'll need at least two (different cultivars) to get fruit. So you'll need to keep or replace the crippled one, sounds like.

Beats me. I've resisted the temptation to pick one from a local park or the botanic gardens (even if I wanted to ruin it for others, blah blah blah, it would be hard to get there just when the fruit is ripe) and I haven't made it to the one farmer's market around here which is said to sell them.
http://www.integrationacres.com/products.html claims to sell them by mail order (fresh in season, or frozen pulp) but I'd be curious how well that works. Paw paws don't store or ship especially well, according to everything I've read.
My own two trees are about 2-3 feet tall. One is 'Davis' the other 'Mango' (these cultivars originated by being collected from wild trees in Michigan and Georgia). Planted them this spring from small nursury plants. They're doing OK - put on some leaves but no huge growth spurt yet. Hopefully they are putting down that deep taproot which paw paws are known for.
Some sources say the flavor varies quite a bit from cultivar to cultivar (or tree to tree in the case of seedlings).
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