Cicadas are coming soon

Here in the Midwest, we expect the 17 year Cicadas to appear around Mid-May and extend to mid June. They like young fruit trees for laying their eggs by slitting the bark. They can severly weaken a tree and leave it open for infection. Larger trees may not be bothered by them. The solutions I have seen are mostly recommending covering the young trees with a fabric cloth or possibly using Surround. I don't like either of these two ideas, so if someone knows of a better solution, please let me know.
Sherwin D.
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sherwindu wrote:

Here in the Ohio Valley we had our Cicada invasion back in 2004. For young trees the solution of covering the trees with a light fabric cloth is the best solution I found. Neighbors who did not cover their young trees did have a lot more damage and it took several years for the trees to recover (but no one that I know of lost a tree).
By the way, I do have some information on my web site, http://members.iglou.com/brosen/cicada1.htm along with three dozen pictures of our 2004 invasion.
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

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Why would the mid-west have a different cicada cycle? By the way, I'm considered to be in the mid-west and we had it here in 2004, too, so I'm really confused now.
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Not sure why you think there was a Cicada invasion in the Midwest in 2004. I did not see it here near Chicago. As far as I know, the most common cycles in North America are 17 years for the Northern Cicadas and 13 year cycles for the Sourthern Cicadas.
I'm still confused about whether the Cicadas crawl up the tree trunks to do their damage, or fly up to the branches for the same purpose. I think the Nymphs crawl out of their holes and up the trees to lay the eggs. Is that the source of the tree damage and if you prevent them from crawling up the trunk, would that stem the damage?
Sherwin D.
FragileWarrior wrote:

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I'm in central Indiana. The Cicada invasion in 2004 made headline news across the country because both types of Cicadas cycled together and the noise and *smell* were incredible. You couldn't take a step without crunching one.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/03/0329_040329_cicadas.html
From IU in 2004. Next date for 17 year Cicada, 2021: http://newsinfo.iu.edu/news/page/normal/1348.html
Cicada Watch 2004: http://inside.msj.edu/academics/faculty/kritskg/cicada / This site has a map that highlights the heaviest invasions. Chicago is on the outer edge of the heaviest invasion.
They even made T-Shirts with Cicada pics on them to commemorate the occasion: http://www.cafepress.com/trendyteeshirts/634225
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Where was I? :-) I'm in northern Illinois, and I don't remember anything like that. Did it miss us?
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sherwindu wrote:

--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

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sherwindu wrote:

There was a Cicada invasion in the midwest in 2004. My area (the Ohio valley) is part of the midwest and we had a large invasion as my web site shows: http://members.iglou.com/brosen/cicada1.htm
The midwest is a very big area and Cicadas invasions usually only cover small parts of an area. They group that is about to hit your area is called brood XIII and this site, http://www.cicadamania.com/cicadas/ has some information on it.
The damage to trees occurs after the females breed with the males and then fly up to the tree branches to lay their eggs. The last two pictures on this page, http://members.iglou.com/brosen/cpage6.htm shows the female laying eggs and the damage done when she cuts slits in the small tree branch to lay her eggs. The Nymphs coming out of the ground cause no damage at all.
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

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sherwindu wrote:

My area (the Ohio valley) is part of the midwest and we had a large invasion in 2004 as my web site shows: http://members.iglou.com/brosen/cicada1.htm
The midwest is a very big area and Cicadas invasions usually only cover small parts of an area. They group that is about to hit your area is called brood XIII and this site, http://www.cicadamania.com/cicadas/ has some information on it.
The damage to trees occurs after the females breed with the males and then fly up to the tree branches to lay their eggs. The last two pictures on this page, http://members.iglou.com/brosen/cpage6.htm shows the female laying eggs and the damage done when she cuts slits in the small tree branch to lay her eggs. The Nymphs coming out of the ground cause no damage at all.
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

Gardening for over 40 years
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sherwindu wrote:

My area (the Ohio valley) is part of the midwest and we had a large invasion in 2004 as my web site shows: http://members.iglou.com/brosen/cicada1.htm
The midwest is a very big area and Cicadas invasions usually only cover small parts of an area. They group of Cicadas that is about to hit your area is called brood XIII and this site, http://www.cicadamania.com/cicadas/ has some information on it.
The damage to trees occurs after the females breed with the males and then fly up to the tree branches to lay their eggs. The last two pictures on this page, http://members.iglou.com/brosen/cpage6.htm shows the female laying eggs and the damage done when she cuts slits in the small tree branch to lay her eggs. The Nymphs coming out of the ground cause no damage at all.
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

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Sorry for all the multiple posts. The news server said the messages weren't being posted so I kept re-trying.
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Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

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