Wiring to consumer units


Are you allowed to wire more than one circuit into a fuseway or mcb. I want to add a one light and switch and add a circuit feeding two double sockets.the consumer unit does not have any spare slots. The wiring is for a garage conversion, the consumer unit is sited in the the garage adding the circuits this way makes it a nice easy job. The building inspector wants to see a certificate when the work is complete, I do not want to do the job and then find I cannot get a certificate. Any guidance and advice appreciated.
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Yes if you use common sence. Muliple feeds at lighting MCBs are common eg. you use two runs from one MCB for the downstairs lights as the CU is in the middle of the house and it is easier to wire that way. You cannot add another circuit if the existing circuit is fully loaded (ie 1.3kw or already has 13 lights on it for a 6A MCB
As to the sockets, is it a radial or a ring?
The

Who is supplying the inspector with the certificate? What certificate does he want?
Let me know
Adam
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wrote:

Thanks Adam The downstairs lighting circuit feeds 10 lights, the sockets will be ring. I think I can cut into the existing downstairs ring circuit to add the two sockets. ( Have a double socket already in the garage ) All the downstairs circuit is RCD protected. Not sure exactly what certificate is required, I was going to put in the circuits and then get a electrician to test them. I will ring the inspector and find out.
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It's presumably for Part P Building Regulations.
You can't "put in the circuits and then get a electrician to test them", the alternatives for getting through Building Regulations are:- Do it yourself and have it inspected by the Council Building Regulations people who will then sign it off. It's up to them (by arrangement with you) when and what inspections they do. They are not allowed to charge you any extra for this, it must be included in the standard Building regulations charges. They then give you the paperwork as part of the overall Building Regulations approval.
Get an electrician who can 'self certify' to do the work and then the certificate he gives you can be passed on to Building Regs. to show that the work is up to standard.
In the 'do it yourself' case if you can convince the Building Regs people that you are competant and have the right test equipment then they may be happy to certify/accept it on this basis.
What *isn't* possible is to get a third party who hasn't done the work to provide a certificate, the only people who can do that are the Building regs people.
--
Chris Green

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HI, the best solution is to install a seperete db with an rcd isolator and two ways,one 6 amp for lights and one 30 amps for sockets. this way it will seperate from house wiring .

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That doesn't make much sense as a fuseway effectively defines a circuit.

You can have spurs feeding a single or double socket taken from the ring circuit fuse. Each will need a separate cable back to the fuseway, so if there's more than one, it will probably be easier to modify the ring to include them in it, rather than as spurs.
The lighting circuit is no problem to take another cable directly from the fuseway as it's a radial.

If you are doing the work, then building control are required to provide the certificate at their expense -- that what you paid them for. They are not permitted to ask you to get it inspected, although there have been stories of a number trying this on. This is explained very clearly in the Part P document. If you are employing a Part P electrician, then he will provide the certificate, but the job no longer requires any building control involvement.
If you connect up the lights and sockets to the existing circuits without going into the CU, then it's minor works and again no certificate or building control involvement is required.
--
Andrew Gabriel
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