water softener


Can anyone recommend a water softener that can be fitted to the rising main that will cut down on limescale in kettles, pipes etc? I'm not talking about the magnetic type of water conditioners though. Thanks AJ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There are several types available. Which one you choose will depend on who you get to fit it, although some are not a difficult DIY task. For my money, I got one with a water meter. These don't recycle until you've used a specified amount of water and then do so the following night. These are best if your consumption is not regular. Simple timed ones will tend to use more salt, although the extra cost of the water meter may well outweigh the cost of extra (water and) salt used. When looking at specifications, check the maximum flow rate, especially if you have an electric shower or combi boiler. Make sure it can more than meet the max flow expected through these.Modern ones are quite small and can fit inside a cupboard, out of sight. If yours will be on view, you may be particular about appearance.Small ones will need topping up with salt more often but that's not a bad thing as you might forget to check with something that's not so frequent. Hope that's of help. Roger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

I don't think using a conventional ion exchange water softener is a good idea for any water you drink. These softeners basically exchange the Calcium in the water with Sodium from the salt and as we are all aware, too much salt (Sodium) is not good for your blood pressure.
Adrian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Adrian Chapman wrote:

For that reason a lot of softeners supply all the taps EXCEPT the kitchen - drinking water - tap. The water may not taste salty (Sodium chloride) as the sodium is I think a carbonate, but it's still sodium.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Adrian Chapman wrote:

Actually, too much sodium _can_ cause a rise in blood pressure. Not _will_. Some people just aren't affected.
Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I read it's more likely linked to age. I.e. as you age, you cannot remove sodium from the blood stream.
JW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Whitworth wrote:

You made me do some research.
There's a race/genetics link. Afro-Americans, for example, are very prone to high blood pressure, and sodium intolerant.
There's an age link. BP goes up, and sodium tolerance down, with age.
There's a sex link. Women don't tend to get as much high BP.
There's an obesity link. Finally one we can do something about.
There's a potassium link. The sodium-potassium ratio, and possibly the sodium-calcium ratio, are linked to high blood pressure. This is an easy one - look for low sodium (high potassium) salt next time you go shopping!
There's an alcohol link. Not a simple one though - our government would like you to think less is best, but it seems as though a small amount - under the normal 21 /14 unit level - may help keep BP _down_.
So keeping my BMI in trim (23 isn't bad at my age!) and having a pint to rehydrate after getting all hot and sweaty earlier isn't bad!
Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Slight hijack here...
When we moved into this house, it had one of those 'screw in' water softener canisters under the kitchen sink. The blue & white ones, which have a yellow month pointer on them. That was 5 years ago, and I've replaced the thing once. When I unscrewed it, I was surprised that there was no pressure behind it.
- is it correct for there to be no pressure into those canisters? - what's is the consequence of not replacing them?
Cheers
JW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.