Storing Mitre saw outside


We have a tiny terraced house in london and have no space to store a fairly new electric mitre saw, not even in the garden shed. Its been in our living room for a while, but it has to go outside.
Was thinking of standing it on some bricks with a couple of bin liners over it. would this be enough protection for it over winter to prevent it coming to any harm or is there some better way to protect it? Thanks.
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johngood_____ wrote:

It is going to be damp and condensation that is going to damage it.
I would suggest using at least rubble sacks (ie thicker plastic covering) and trying to get the covering air-tight (lots of gaffer tape).
Include some silica gel (eg ebay item 280182611348) to mop up any moisture already present or that gets in during storage.
The silica gel is reusable..So you can repeat this, next Winter..
--
Sue

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It'll be nicked within 24 hours!
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Forgive me, but isn't that what lofts are for?
Under a bed?
Top of a wardrobe?
Backmost corner of a kitchen cupboard?
I live in a reasonable size semi now, but our first place was so small I used to sleep with my feet in the wardrobe!! (No doors or back on the wardrobe placed at the only free space at the foot of the bed.
Could it go in the boot of the car for a while?
How about one of those toolstore things from B and Q for about 100? Sorry I have no idea if you can afford to take that route, I know I couldn't right now!! (You'd still have to double/triple bag it though)
Al
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Hi there, where do you live? Just curious.
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johngood_____ wrote:

johngood,
Spray all metal parts liberally with WD40 - or better still, the old Damp Start that they used to use on the likes of the old Mini cars when I was a young lad - and then cover the thing with a small 'plastic' tarpaulin type sheet (available from the dreaded B&Q I believe.
If you don't want to spray the saw with WD40 etc, at the very least, wipe all the metal parts with a rag that has been generously soaked with 3 in 1 oil or similar - don't use car engine oil for this by the way, the additives in it will apparently attack some metals, rubber and plastics [1] - and then cover.
Also, if you are going to stand it on "a couple of bricks" put some plastic sheeting on top of them and under the saw base to act as a dpc - bricks will absorb water (unless they are of the engineering type)
[1] I cannot vouch for this as it was some advice that I was given several years ago by an old engineer who stored and renovated machinery.
Brian G
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WD40 is not a good idea. It will simply wash off any oil protecting film, leaving the metal to rust even faster. As you say below, you want to coat the metalwork with a protective oil film.

I would find something that sprays on -- you won't get a rag in all the teeth for example.

But as someone else said, it'll get nicked before it gets a chance to go rusty.
--
Andrew Gabriel
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