Prviate Water supply problems

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WATER SUPPLY PROBLEM
DURING FREEZING CONDITIONS THE PIPE TO THE PRESSURE SWITCH WAS FROZEN RESULTING IN NO WATER
AFTER UNFREEZING THE SWITCH STARTED HUNTING AND I IMMEDIATELY THOUGHT THAT THE PRESSURE IN THE AQUA UNIT HAD FALLEN.
I CHECKED THIS AND IT WAS CORRECT AT 1.38 BAR
ORIGINALLY THE STARTING PRESSURE READING WAS 1.69 BAR
AND THE STOPPING PRESSURE WAS 2.07 BAR
THE READING AT PRESENT IS STARTING PRESSURE 5.8 BAR
AND THE STOPPING PRESSURE IS 6.5 BAR
THIS IS EXCESSIVE AND I AM WONDERING IF THE PRESSURE GAUGE IS NOW FAULTY AFTER THE FREEZE?
AS THE WATER CONTINUES TO FLOW WHAT ELSE COULD CAUSE THIS HIGH PRESSURE?
WHEN I SWITCH THE PUMP OFF AND OPEN THE TAP THE PRESSURE REDUCES TO 1.38 BAR AND STAYS THERE
HELP!!!! BLAIR MALCOLM
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What was the reply??? I apologise for the capitals as I just copied a sheet I had typed previously Blair

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Okay. I was rude. Do it all again and go into detail. I don't know what a pressure switch is or wtf a Aqua unit is and judging by the lack of support nobody else does.
If condensing boiler the condense pipe could have been frozen up, but should now be okay. Reboot and use 1.5 bar.
Mr Pounder

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pressure vessel which keeps a minimum pressure on the system so that when a tap is opened the pressure in the vessel pushes the water out of the tap and then at a reduced pressure the pump kicks in and continues to supply water until the tap is turned off. At that point the pressure switch turns the pump off This pressure switch is set to start at 1.69 bar with a stopping pressure of 2.07bar The pressure in the pressure vessel is at 1.38bar After the freeze and the unfreezing I find the water flows OK but it is hunting continuously and the pressure on the pressure gauge shows a starting pressure of 5.8bar and a stopping pressure of 6.5bar Either the gauge has been damaged or there is a fault in the system which I cannot find. I was hoping that someone with a similar system would be able to help I do appreciate your help Blair
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On 02/01/2011 15:22, bm wrote:

I meant it about uk.d-i-y. This is cross-posted to both groups.
Andy
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As long as your pressure vessel diaphragm, precharge and its connection to the pipeline is clear and completely thawed it sounds as though the pressure switch has been damaged by the expansion of ice within it. It might adjust down again but I'd be looking to fit a new one and make provision to prevent recurrence of the frost damage such as trace heating and lagging
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for the OP (thanks Andy) where is the pump located - in a well, below ground, above ground, - IOW could it have been frosted? did the suupply get interrupted recently? (assuming you are in UK/Eire)
Jim K
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wrote:

The pump is above ground and is adequately insulated Drawing water from a large tank which is supplied by a pipe driven into the ground some 100 years ago. The water comes from a deep underground source at a rate of 4 gallons a minute As I said the water is flowing out of my taps Blair
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yet that alone would not explain the high readings on the pressure gauge would it?
Jim K
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wrote:

Your pressure vessel has lost its air/gas capacity. It has a diaphragm across it with air/gas behind which provides the hysterisis, (ie a bit of capacity between the pump starting and stopping). If you loose the air/gas it will do exactly as you describe. I can only suppose that the cold has damaged the diaphragm and the air/gas has been lost. They are usually made in two halves, the diaphragm is located on the joint.
Some have a valve and can be repumped and some don't. (Car foot pump) This won't help if the diaphragm is split of course. Some are charged with nitrogen, not air & you can only replace them. Some can be dismantled and some can't (Most small ones can't).
But whatever, you have lost your gas/air out of the chamber
That was the first thing I checked and the pressure is unchanged Blair
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wrote:

You need to check there is air in it. there might be pressure and no air. That's impossible there has to be air or a gas in the bladder Blair
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On 05/01/2011 18:04, bm wrote:

No, it's not impossible. If the bladder is ruptured, the gas volume becomes displaced to water. Then the compressibility of the system changes radically, and you can see things like you describe.
Is there a valve you can top up the gas pressure with? If you poke it, does gas or water come out?
If you get any water, then the accumulator is goosed.
--
R




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wrote in message

I do have a valve on the accumulator and I will check Thanks Blair
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i'd check it anyway - the "continuous hunting" you describe could be what my similar setup does when there's no/not enough air in the pressure vessel to slow the pump hysteresis. the pump will still pressurize the tank with water .... (to pump air in easily, remember to switch off the pump and open a tap - so as you pump air in the water has somewhere to go)
Jim K
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The pressure even without gas in the accumulator would drop to the pump start pressure before cutting in. As I said previously and subject to the checks I listed I would be looking at the pressure switch being damaged by the frost. The available cushion volume will be very much reduced at the high pressures quoted simply because it is compressed. Reduced cushion volume - reduced hysteresis and hunting results.
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your theory assumes the pump is capable of those high pressures - seems a bit "over spec" to say the least?
Jim K
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
something like:

Those pumps will reach that, no problem.
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wrote:

which pump are we talking about again?
Jim K
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
something like:

Fuck knows, I haven't clapped eyes on the OP's pump. I've occasionally seen pumps of this pump-above-accumulator type at more than 6bar, which is too high for the house pipework, caused by the owner fiddling or the settings drifting. http://www.brisanpumps.com/modules/products/product.php?prod 8
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