OT Speed of Processor

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On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 11:57:17 +0000, Adrian wrote:

You can identify the socket or slot type easily enough (although you'll have to open the case). In the event that the machine isn't fast enough, it's quick to tell if there is a faster CPU you can put in, or whether more is needed.
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On 11 Jan 2011 12:28:25 GMT, Bob Eager wrote:

So if there was a big heatsink obscuring the socket area, you could determine if you were looking at a Socket 1155 or Socket 1156 machine by sight? ;-)
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Do you indeed?

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Peter Scott wrote:

Not ever felt the need to try it but does it do more than the system info available in Microsoft Office software? (Open Word/Excel or other program, go to "Help/About/system info".
Tim
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On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 13:53:46 -0000, Tim Downie wrote:

Yes. A bit more technical - and shows actual speeds etc.
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On Jan 10, 11:15pm, "the_constructor"

Put a memtest86 cd in and boot. You'll see the cpu freq and amount of ram right away. You may need to go into bios to tell it to boot from cd before hdd - leave it that way.
In the unlikely event that its a very old 95 era machine heavily upgraded you might need to use a memtest floppy.
NT
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I dare say there will be some die-hards who reckon such a machine is still useable, but you tend to find anything that has 98 on it originally will really struggle these days as it will be more than 10 years old. Anyone who had beefed a machine of that era up would have upgraded it to XP too if they had any sense, so chances are yours is standard.
Its not just CPUs that have moved on, its the entire machine architecture (memory, disks, USB interfaces, CD/DVD drives, graphics etc.) - and this is reflected in the minimum system requirements for any software you want to run these days.
I've just chucked out an 800Mhz PIII from the Win 98SE era for a friend, (couldn't even give it away though I did manage to flog the XP upgrade pack it had). If your machine had 98 on originally (as opposed to 98 SE) it could even be a PII.
Support for Win 98 was dropped by Microsoft back in 2006 so most new software releases and products don't support it either. Newer USB devices will be a pain too as they won't bother to write drivers for 98SE.
If you do keep it for any reason, throwing some extra s/h RAM at it will help it the most for just a few quid.
PS - I'm not against old machines. I still run a 3.2G P4 with 2G of memory on XP, but even this setup is starting to show its age as software tends to get more obese over time.
Midge.
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I don't mind that it is an old machine, 286, 386 or 486 would have suited me better for Ham Radio programming of Philips and Motorola radios as a slow machine is required.
I have just done a search for the motherboard and come up with this:
http://active-hardware.com/english/reviews/mainboard/ga-6wmm7.htm
Jim
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If you have a specific need, then great - I ran some old 486 machines until about 2003 as they were just doing a simple job using a DOS application. It was the equipment they were connected to which went unsupportable first!
It looks like the motherboard is for a Celeron, so given the age, and the fact the earliest 266 Celeron didn't have a L2 cache, it could be anything between 300Mhz and 533Mhz.
You should be able to confirm from the chip if none of the other methods can correctly identify it. See http://www.oldcpu.cz/CPU/Intel/Celeron-PPGA-socket-370
Midge.
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I had, in fact still have, a similar dual Celeron motherboard. It was in use a file and print server until recently. It was happily running Ubuntu at a reasonable speed.
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On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 08:32:30 -0000, Midge wrote:

Very much stil useable. That is what my server is. It does the job without fuss and being a PIII only has a large slow fan in the PSU so is pretty damn quiet. Runs SME Server, a very stable and reliable "out of the box" linux based server/firewall/gateway solution.
Depends what you want to do with the machine, email, news and web doesn't need a octo core 500GHz processor with 6TB of RAM and a couple of PB of disc space...
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On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 09:17:13 +0000, Dave Liquorice wrote:

What made me upgrade was the terrible power consumption. My firewall was using 60-70W, and it's on 24/7. A faster CPU and I'm now using 15W..total.
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Which version of SME Server are you using as a matter of interest?
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On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 13:46:02 +0000, Andy wrote:

7.5.1 fully updated as of 16 days 16 hrs ago. It just works. B-)
v8 is at beta 6 but I don't want to play with that on a live system.
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putting xp on a 98 machine is a poor idea, its simply too heavy an operating system. 98 has many issues, but most are resolvable, whereas xp on such old kit would make it imitate a slug.

I dont know any task barring video software that wont run on a 466 celery. Lots of programs wont, but for pretty well everything there's a leaner designed bit of software that will go fast on such old hardware, given the right OS etc.

Most new software has no business running on a P2. You need a distro designed for an old PC, and for apps either bundled light apps, as linux generally does, or else hand picked light apps for win, if for some reason you msut run win.

Yes - though again for most stuff its easy to get used hadrware even now that will run fine

Not normally needed, nusb3.1 solves all that. Dont use win98 without nusb, its out of the box handling of usb is painful.

max it out, it makes all the difference. Freecycle is handy for old ram.

A lot of people make the mistake of picking obese software, it really is optional.
On a 466 I'd probably run Antix or perhaps Puppy for a general purpose desktop.
NT
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wrote:

Put a memtest86 cd in and boot. You'll see the cpu freq and amount of ram right away. You may need to go into bios to tell it to boot from cd before hdd - leave it that way.
In the unlikely event that its a very old 95 era machine heavily upgraded you might need to use a memtest floppy.
NT
Many thanks to all for the advice, I have just ran this program: http://www.wizard-soft.com/cpuspeed/index.htm and it showed the the speed of the processor was 467.7 MHz, which hopefully will do fine for what I need.
Jim
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Makes sense - 466 is one of the flavours.
wrote:

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I ran it on mine, came up with 'actual speed', 2700MHz, but 'published speed' was also 2700MHz.
Sounds a bit suspicious actually; a bit like driving a car with a rated top speed of 120mph, and achieving exactly 120mph top speed.
Is it really measuring anything, or just reading out the clock setting from some register or other?
(I also tried CPUZ that someone else posted; that came up with a core speed of 800MHz, a multiplier of 4, and a HT link of 2000MHz (whatever that lot means).)
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On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 11:50:16 -0000, BartC wrote:

Having the speed the same as the stated speed simply means that your clock is running very accurately. However, I would generally expect to see the actual speed at perhaps a few megahertz higher or lower.
Not sure I understand the CPUZ figures you've posted. Unless your CPU has ramped down to a very slow speed as sitting idle.
HT is Hypertransport. Basically just another bus within the system, which is used to shuttle data between the CPU, memory and a few other devices at high speed.
Obviously AMD, but what processor do you have?
Just ran CPU-Z on mine, and my bus speed varies from 399.9 MHz to 400.1 MHz. The multiplier changes from 6.0x to 8.0x times when more CPU power is required.
The CPUspeed program simply tells me that my CPU is running at 3200.3 MHz. In other words, only half of the story.
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I suppose I got the idea that cpuspeed would give me some sort of comparative performance figure.
Just telling me the clock speed (something that Control Panel->System tells me anyway) at first doesn't sound so impressive (until you to think about how exactly it might achieve it, unless it is somehow making use of the real time clock or something).

Did you work that out from my post? Yes, it's an AMD Athlon II I believe.

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