Mounting a wall hung sink on partition wall?


My daughter bought a new bathroom suite from B&Q which included a no-pedestal sink. Two "ex plumbers" have walked away from fitting the sink saying that the partition wall is not suitable. I checked it out and found that the wall has one vertical strap just off the centre of the sink. The sink fixings are 8mm x 110mm special coachbolt type and too short to reach any strap I might fit on the other side of the wall. My plan was to buy screwed rod to replace the special bolts. However this appears to be quite a heavy sink and there are a couple of 6-8 year old kids around
Any advice appreciated as to what pitfalls might remain? e.g. is it okay to mount the sink directly to the plasterboard surface or should I face the wall with plywood?
Beemer
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"Beemer" wrote:

Either the wall needs considerable strengthening with new studs and noggins to safely support the weight of the sink and children who may sit, pull or lean on it, or a pedestal sink needs to be installed instead. Personally I don't think it is safe to rely on a partition wall to support a heavy sink.
Even with a pedestal sink you may still need new studs and noggins to ensure a good attachment to the each of the two sink fixings. Mounting the sink on plasterboard with or without plywood will be very dangerous.
<http://www.diydata.com/projects/partition/partitionframe.htm
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Phil Anthropist wrote:

Wot' he said.
It can be done.
For example, a substantial piece of plasterboard can be removed to expose the whole of several studs, noggins jointed to them and the plasterboard made good. As the pipework will also be hidden, removing some plasterboard is going to be needed anyway. Removing and replacing a largish piece of plasterboard is often far easier than removing and replacing a small piece.
Lining the wall with structural grade plywood will not help carry the weight to a significant extent - it will help protect the plasterboard from horizontal rotational movement of the sink about the one stud over which it is positioned. But, with adequate internal strengthening of the wall, this wont be needed.
Don't underestimate the incredible leverage that can be achieved by even a modest weight on the edge of such a sink. As well as studs and noggins being strong enough, the fixings need to be anchored well enough to them to take the load. Screwed rod going right through the load-bearing members and big washers to spread the load on the far side sounds a good starting point.
Me? I'd wish I had a solid wall and then go get a different type of sink...
--
Sue











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| Phil Anthropist wrote: | > "Beemer" wrote: | > | >>My daughter bought a new bathroom suite from B&Q which included a | >>no-pedestal sink. Two "ex plumbers" have walked away from fitting the | >>sink | >>saying that the partition wall is not suitable. I checked it out and | >>found | >>that the wall has one vertical strap just off the centre of the sink. | >>The | >>sink fixings are 8mm x 110mm special coachbolt type and too short to reach | >>any strap I might fit on the other side of the wall. My plan was to buy | >>screwed rod to replace the special bolts. However this appears to be | >>quite | >>a heavy sink and there are a couple of 6-8 year old kids around | >> | >>Any advice appreciated as to what pitfalls might remain? e.g. is it okay | >>to mount the sink directly to the plasterboard surface or should I face | >>the | >>wall with plywood? | >> | >>Beemer | > | > | > Either the wall needs considerable strengthening with new studs and noggins | > to safely support the weight of the sink and children who may sit, pull or | > lean on it, or a pedestal sink needs to be installed instead. Personally I | > don't think it is safe to rely on a partition wall to support a heavy sink. | > | > Even with a pedestal sink you may still need new studs and noggins to ensure | > a good attachment to the each of the two sink fixings. Mounting the sink on | > plasterboard with or without plywood will be very dangerous. | > | > <http://www.diydata.com/projects/partition/partitionframe.htm | > | > | Wot' he said. | | It can be done. | | For example, a substantial piece of plasterboard can be removed to | expose the whole of several studs, noggins jointed to them and the | plasterboard made good. As the pipework will also be hidden, removing | some plasterboard is going to be needed anyway. Removing and replacing a | largish piece of plasterboard is often far easier than removing and | replacing a small piece. | | Lining the wall with structural grade plywood will not help carry the | weight to a significant extent - it will help protect the plasterboard | from horizontal rotational movement of the sink about the one stud over | which it is positioned. But, with adequate internal strengthening of the | wall, this wont be needed. | | Don't underestimate the incredible leverage that can be achieved by even | a modest weight on the edge of such a sink. As well as studs and noggins | being strong enough, the fixings need to be anchored well enough to them | to take the load. Screwed rod going right through the load-bearing | members and big washers to spread the load on the far side sounds a good | starting point. | | Me? I'd wish I had a solid wall and then go get a different type of sink... | | -- | Sue |
Sue,
As a former electrician I am quite familiar with mounting heavy items but I thought that there might be some interesting help responses. Thanks for yours and the link. I have also just read about using an S-frame but I see this mentioned only by one supplier
http://www.bathstore.com/_application/search_results.php?q=s-frame&x=0&y=0
and is 106 !!
Beemer
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Beemer wrote:

You can obviously make your own. Three pieces of timber uprights, reaching to the floor, that line up with the existing studs and are secured to them. Noggins jointed between them. Then box the lot in. You may have to add an additional "fake" upright, to extend the boxed-in section so that it is symettrical about the sink. But it could be done quite nicely and even give little shelves/cupboards around the sink. Always handy. But not flush with the wall.
You could get a piece of 1/4" steel plate big enough to reach the floor. Bolt that to one or more existing studs and weld on a couple of fixings for the sink or bolt through the plate. It will be hardly visible, once painted. 3/8" aluminium plate would do - if the plate extends to two or more studs and the guy doing the welding knows what he is about..
--
Sue





The sink isn\'t going to be flush with the existing wall though.
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| > | Phil Anthropist wrote: | > | > "Beemer" wrote: | > | > | > | >>My daughter bought a new bathroom suite from B&Q which included a | > | >>no-pedestal sink. Two "ex plumbers" have walked away from fitting the | > | >>sink | > | >>saying that the partition wall is not suitable. I checked it out and | > | >>found | > | >>that the wall has one vertical strap just off the centre of the sink. | > | >>The | > | >>sink fixings are 8mm x 110mm special coachbolt type and too short to | > reach | > | >>any strap I might fit on the other side of the wall. My plan was to | > buy | > | >>screwed rod to replace the special bolts. However this appears to be | > | >>quite | > | >>a heavy sink and there are a couple of 6-8 year old kids around | > | >> | > | >>Any advice appreciated as to what pitfalls might remain? e.g. is it | > okay | > | >>to mount the sink directly to the plasterboard surface or should I face | > | >>the | > | >>wall with plywood? | > | >> | > | >>Beemer | > | > | > | > | > | > Either the wall needs considerable strengthening with new studs and | > noggins | > | > to safely support the weight of the sink and children who may sit, pull | > or | > | > lean on it, or a pedestal sink needs to be installed instead. Personally | > I | > | > don't think it is safe to rely on a partition wall to support a heavy | > sink. | > | > | > | > Even with a pedestal sink you may still need new studs and noggins to | > ensure | > | > a good attachment to the each of the two sink fixings. Mounting the sink | > on | > | > plasterboard with or without plywood will be very dangerous. | > | > | > | > <http://www.diydata.com/projects/partition/partitionframe.htm | > | > | > | > | > | Wot' he said. | > | | > | It can be done. | > | | > | For example, a substantial piece of plasterboard can be removed to | > | expose the whole of several studs, noggins jointed to them and the | > | plasterboard made good. As the pipework will also be hidden, removing | > | some plasterboard is going to be needed anyway. Removing and replacing a | > | largish piece of plasterboard is often far easier than removing and | > | replacing a small piece. | > | | > | Lining the wall with structural grade plywood will not help carry the | > | weight to a significant extent - it will help protect the plasterboard | > | from horizontal rotational movement of the sink about the one stud over | > | which it is positioned. But, with adequate internal strengthening of the | > | wall, this wont be needed. | > | | > | Don't underestimate the incredible leverage that can be achieved by even | > | a modest weight on the edge of such a sink. As well as studs and noggins | > | being strong enough, the fixings need to be anchored well enough to them | > | to take the load. Screwed rod going right through the load-bearing | > | members and big washers to spread the load on the far side sounds a good | > | starting point. | > | | > | Me? I'd wish I had a solid wall and then go get a different type of | > sink... | > | | > | -- | > | Sue | > | | > | > Sue, | > | > As a former electrician I am quite familiar with mounting heavy items but I | > thought that there might be some interesting help responses. Thanks for | > yours and the link. I have also just read about using an S-frame but I see | > this mentioned only by one supplier | > | > http://www.bathstore.com/_application/search_results.php?q=s-frame&x=0&y=0 | > | > and is 106 !! | | You can obviously make your own. Three pieces of timber uprights, | reaching to the floor, that line up with the existing studs and are | secured to them. Noggins jointed between them. Then box the lot in. You | may have to add an additional "fake" upright, to extend the boxed-in | section so that it is symettrical about the sink. But it could be done | quite nicely and even give little shelves/cupboards around the sink. | Always handy. But not flush with the wall. | | You could get a piece of 1/4" steel plate big enough to reach the floor. | Bolt that to one or more existing studs and weld on a couple of fixings | for the sink or bolt through the plate. It will be hardly visible, once | painted. 3/8" aluminium plate would do - if the plate extends to two or | more studs and the guy doing the welding knows what he is about.. | | -- | Sue | | | | | | The sink isn't going to be flush with the existing wall though. | It's always harder "unfixing" an impulse purchase especially if its not your own!
Thanks,
Beemer
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