Star drill?

Page 4 of 4  
Finding the keyboard operational willshak entered:

Ok, easy solution then. Go back to the kid in tool world and have him get a Dasco 1/2" cold chisel item 142071. You are going to have to hit then turn more then a real star drill but for less then $5 it will do. Bob
--
--
Coffee worth staying up for NY Times
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
willshak wrote:

You mean like this one? <http://www.usahardware.com/inet/shop/item/20800/icn/20-373357/enderes_tools/0786.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
willshak wrote:

You need some more practice in searching perhaps? "star drill steel" turns up many usable hits. http://hand-tools.hardwarestore.com/25-96-star-drills.aspx
But now that you know the old-school tool exists I'll have to say that drilling that many 3/4" holes manually is something even the most die-hard masochist would see as too painful. Buy or rent the proper sort of impact drill and bit and you can be done in a morning's light effort.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HEY! This is akin to someone coming here looking for a source for blocks of ice for their ice box and being informed theres a new product, a refrigerator that can do the same job easily and more convenient.
Perhaps he wants to re live his youth working with a star drill? Dont laugh occasionally I do wierd stuff I had last done as a child just for the heck of it although I avoid the hard work ones these days:)
in any case his question has been asked and answered. Hopefully he will remember to wear safety glasses. Star drills can be dangerous
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And gloves and knee pads, because he is going to be on the ground at least two days stubbornly whacking at something that many of us have done in under an hour. Sheesh...
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In the two communities of Tonopah and Pioche, Nevada, they have annual celebrations. One is for founders day, the other for Labor Day. It's just really an excuse to drink for three days and eat a lot of spicy food, but they have Glorious Titles on them nonetheless.
One of the competitions is mucking. That's seeing who can load the most gravel and rock into a container in five minutes. It comes from the old days when muckers used to go in after a shot and clean up the debris created by the shot. And they worked twelve hour shifts.
Another competition is called single jacking. One man has a hefty sledge hammer, and the other has a star drill with a shaft of about one inch, and a star bigger than that. Remember that this was to put in sticks of dynamite, so the hole wasn't small.
One man would hold the drill. The other would strike it with the sledge. Then the drill holder would rotate the drill, and the hammer man would strike it again. They had a set time limit.
In the old days, poor boy operators did all their blasting with single jacking. Many times with just one man. Lots of mines were one man operations. Drilling came in later, and was the cause of silicosis which limited a man to three months of working in the mines, and at that time, he was coughing so much he was worthless. Then the advent of hydraulic drilling where they simply put a stream of water through the center of the bit, and the dust was eliminated. Dust from other sources in the mine still caused silicosis and miners didn't have a long life span as a group.
Single jacking was an orchestrated ballet. A good team could perform well, but it was a tenuous thing. One miss with the hammer, and the drill holder was off work for a few weeks or months. Swinging a heavy hammer at a steady rate at sometimes overhead angles was something a lot of men simply couldn't do more than five minutes.
The competitions I witnessed in Pioche and Tonopah were on a flat level surface. In the real mines, they were in every imaginable angle.
It's always fun to watch other people work their butts off, and holler HURRY UP while you're drinking a beer.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Minor correction. Your description is 'double jacking' - two man. 'Single jacking' is one man who both holds the drill and wields the hand sledge.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I never claimed to be perfect.
Or ever wanted to be.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 07 Oct 2007 18:22:00 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Reliving one's youth is one thing, 40 holes is another! <bg> Even in my youth I'd not have wanted to drill 40 holes by hand...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I was a Teamster for 37 years. We had a saying that if you give a lazy man a job to do, he'll find the quickest easiest way to do it. I think even a Teamster would go rent a rotohammer.
Steve ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Even a dumb one would wise up after a few holes. Me, I heat with wood, have a hydraulic splitter but do all my splitting with wedge/ sledge/maul except for the knots/crotches. One the face of it it looks stupid but I am retired and it is the only real excercise I get. Going through 6 cord every year keeps me from blowing up like a balloon.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'm blessed with good genes, I guess. I'm 59, 5-10, 180#, and can outdo younger men. But after an 8 1/2 hour heart surgery, I choose to use power a lot. I'm still pretty strong, but nothing like when I was younger. I still do a lot, but the pain of having your sternum sawed in half never goes away totally, and I live in constant pain. But it's like working out where it's cold and wet and dirty. Most of the time I would just tell the young whiners, "What makes you think I'm not cold, wet, dirty, hungry, and have water running down the crack of MY ass, too? Now quit your whining, shut the fuck up and go to work like the rest of us."
Hope I don't have my sister's genes. She's 63 and had a heart transplant in June. Got the heart of a 25 year old man. Says she feels better than she has in years. I'll bet. For the last year, she's been lugging around a left ventricular assist machine.
Look that up in your Google.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
on 10/6/2007 5:24 PM willshak said the following:

I finished the last of the holes today (12). Actually, there were only 30 rather than 40. It was good that I overestimated because I finished sooner. I have to thank two addition people. One that suggested using a pilot drill. I did have a 3/8" concrete bit, and used that before the 3/4" drill and it was better. Thanks. One that suggested a 3/4" cold chisel to break up the aggregate. That worked better after I had the 3/8; pilot hole drilled to 2" deep. Thanks One additional thing that I didn't notice. While I was taking a break, I picked up the plastic tag that had been attached to the 3/4 concrete drill when I bought it. Looking on the back of the tag in molded, small letters, was the following: Recommended minimum speed 1100 RPM. The 1/2" power drill I had been using was only rated at 600 RPM.. I brought out my 3/8" power drill rated at 1200 RPM. I didn't notice much difference with the 3/4" concrete bit, but it seemed to work better with the 3/8" bit. If it hadn't been in the 80s, with a humidity of 75 % for the past 4 days, I would have finished in half the time. As it was, I had to stop occasionally for a hose down and a brew and cigarette.. I did not buy or rent a Hammer drill. I didn't even use the star drill I asked about ($$$ saved all around).
For anyone interested, I am 70 years old, so I've been around a while. I have been retired since 1999. I am 6' 2" tall. I weigh 185 lbs. I have a 35' waist. I have 41" hips. I wear a 42" long jacket. I wear a 16" long shirt. All the above is in case someone wants to buy me some clothes. My body fat index is 19.9%. A little high, but I think it is the beer. My right arm is now bigger than my left arm from all this hammering, but that because I have torn ligaments in my left shoulder from manhandling a tractor, and I don't use it for heavy or precise work. I am not afraid of hard work. I have done a lot of projects alone that would have taken a couple of younger guys to accomplish. If you've ever seen an old Italian mason working, you'll notice that he may be slow, but he is persistent. While the younger guys have to stop and pick their nose, the old guy keeps on working, and at the end of the day, he's done more than the youngsters.
Look at all the $$$ I've saved.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.