Plumbing problems


Have discovered a leak in the Cu plumbing in our slab. Have also discovered that the pipe is not encased in "min 25 mil" sleeve as required by codes applicable in the state of Texas.
What if anything can I do to prevent future failures?. I plan to give the plumber who did this a little to think about but also will go to the state licensing board about it. However, that doesn't fix my problem.
Any ideas? Experiences?
Gary
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"Any ideas? Experiences?"
If you've got one how many more places are "close" to leaking. I'm not a huge fan fresh water in slabs but the sleeves seem to prevent problems.
Depending on the installation (one story, two story; how many bathrooms, supply location,etc) I would consider a reroute or repipe.
If the plumber has insurance you might be able to recover through them.
Just a letter to the insurance company, no lawyer might shake some bucks loose.
This might be an alternative, my sons neighbor had it done
http://www.curaflo.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=pages.showpage&pageid 
http://www.dolanbrau.com/pinholes/story/mine /
cheers Bob
I thought Texas had no building code? or is this covered by mechanical?
Gary
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gary wrote:

the
When you say copper pipe in the slab, do you mean just passing through, or as in radiant floor heating? If it's the latter I know that it was an epidemic of pandemic proportions in Levittown, NY - that huge post-WWII tract housing development. All the houses were built slab-on-grade with copper radiant heating (seemed like a good idea at the time) and they all failed. Seems that concrete and copper don't like each other.
Elaborate a little on your situation.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

I'll try to answer both replies with this email. First it is drinking water service. In Texas most of the builders simply have the plumbing run through the slab not under it and then back up. They use the red and blue crap instead of the code mandated 25 mil sleeving.
The state has adopted the plumbing and electrical codes for all unincorporated areas many years ago. However, no inspector so very little compliance.
The pipe is being rerouted as we speak but I called the Curaflow distributor for my area. Rough over the phone quote for a 2400 sq ft, 2.5 bath house with water softener is upwards of $9700.
I have already contacted the state Licensing board will see what I can do to get the attention of the contractor who cut corners.
Gary
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Depends what the source problem actually was, in order to prevent a future problem. If the area you live in is municipality of over 5,000 inhabitants, its subject to IRC 2000 per Texas law regarding plumbing code. This Texas law was adopted in 2001 referring at the time to the current IRC. Both the municipality and plumber doing the work are responsible. If you live outsde such a municipality, its not subject to this law for there is no municipality. But, in Texas, regardless of presence of municipality or not, the recenly built home is still subject to IRC 2000. However, there is no municipal plumbing inspection. Note that a Texas county is not considered a municipality. Your post implies that the house was recently built, so I won't go into time constraints of this code. There is no official recourse for non-municipality areas, the buyer/owner has to cover his own butt regarding requiring items that will be covered by typical building procedures. There are structural and electrical areas of concern that will not be visually seen when the house is finished as well. Better take a closer look if you can do so. Taking many pictures during the building process helps out when you're not sure..
Your current problem, CU piping leaking in the slab, has to be dug up and replaced. Or, plugged at the inlet to the house and the other side of the leak in the viciinity of all valves and fixtures, and routed elsewhere to your current valves and fixures. Either way is a major headache and inconvenience for the homeowner. Check with a few reputable plumbing firms, and get estimates and how they intend to perform the repairs.
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