Plumbing rough-in before roofer?

My plumber wants to do his rough in before the shingles go on I guess
so he can get his vent stacks done without any interference. Is this
the typical sequence? I'd really rather get some roofing on as early
as possible and let plumber get in there afterwards. any thoughts?
this is new residential construction.
Reply to
jam6444
I am in the same exact spot you are. It really doesn't matter who goes first, but typically the plumber *wants* to go first so he doesn't have to get up on the roof later to install the flanges, flashing, etc. I was like you and wanted to get the roof on ASAP, so advised the plumber and he rushed out to at least cut the holes in the roof for me. Then the roofers were able to install the flashing and all the plumber has to do is stick the pipes up into the flashing.
If it were me, I would get the roof on ASAP and advise the plumber. Its in his/her own best interest to get out there and at least cut the holes. We only had 3 penetrations for plumbing and it took about 15 mins. He doesn't need to connect all the rough plumbing together yet - just cut the holes.
I believe *normal* is that the roof goes on first and the plumber cuts the holes and puts the flashing up. But I wanted to play nice and hopefully make less work for the plumber and it sounds like you want to do the same.
Reply to
Hambone
but typically the plumber *wants* to go first so he doesn't have to get up
wanted to get the roof on ASAP, so advised the plumber and he rushed out to at
the flashing and all the plumber has to do is stick the pipes up into the
his/her own best interest to get out there and at least cut the holes. We only
connect all the rough plumbing together yet - just cut the holes.
holes and puts the flashing up. But I wanted to play nice and hopefully make
That was my thinking exactly. Just put the stacks in first, so roofer can get on with it.
Reply to
jam6444
Yes - or make it even easier for your plumber and tell him you don't even need the stacks yet - you only the holes cut in the roof sheathing. That takes some thought as to where you want the stacks located, but with enough attic room it really doesn't matter as the plumber can move them around in the attic (do a certain degree). But he will need to know how big to make the holes - i.e., 2" vent, 3" vent, etc.
Reply to
Hambone
No, that isn't typical and I'll bet the roofers will not be happy having to roll paper and install shingles around the vent pipe(s), but I can certainly see why your plumber would rather be first! :-)
Matt
Reply to
Matt Whiting
I see nothing wrong with both proceeding at the same time. Most plumbing I have seen was waterproof and if both are proceeding at the same time, the job obviously is moving long faster. It should be the roofers job to install the flashings while it is being roofed anyway..
"Matt Whiting" wrote in message >
Reply to
Glenn
I'm surprised by teh responses to this post. Especially Matt's post since he is usually right on.
Perhaps this is regional...like gutters before siding in Seattle.
In the South, however, the norm is that as soon as the framing rough is complete, the plumbers begin their rough-in.
Once the plumbers are substantially complete, the HVAC guy gets in there. On thier first day, they make all their roof penetrations for gas flues, bath exhaust vents, etc.
Then, the roofer installs shingles on the house. The roofer will use the "pipe flashing" that the plumber left for him to flash around the plumbing stacks. And the roofer will be able to properly shingle around all the other vents.
And here's why:
Plumbers are not roofers and should not be on the roof. If the shingles are on before the stacks are through the roof, the roofer has to return to repair a roof that could have been properly installed.
HVAC guys are not roofers and should not be on the roof. If the shingles are on before they get there, they'll have to get on the roof to flash around their penetrations.
Further explanation on the two preceding paragraphs:
If you shingle first, someone HAS to get on the roof. But there will no longer be toe boards so it is much more dangerous. Since they will be up there for only a few minutes, it is unlikely that they will use harness and be properly tied off.
Plumbers and HVAC contractors probably do not even own the proper equipment to safely navigate a steep pitch. Do you want them on slippery shingles with no toe boards and no harenssess?
Instead of freaking out about the roof now, you should have made sure your framer did a good job "drying in" the job with felt. And you should have used Advantech so it won't matter if it gets wet a few more times.
Shannon Pate
Reply to
Shannon Pate
Maybe. Around here with our fairly wet weather, we dry in the house as soon as possible and nothing is going to delay that, not plumbing vents or anything else. The plumbers here are quite capable of installing vents through a shingled roof. Mine did so with no problem at all. I have four penetrations (I have two attic furnaces) and all were done very professionally and none of leaked after 6 years. The plumbers had no problem working on my 16/12 pitch roof.
Matt
Reply to
Matt Whiting
On Sat, 14 Apr 2007 12:53:56 GMT, Matt Whiting wrote:
The plumbers had
I didn't know Spiderman did plumbing. :)
--Andy Asberry-- ------Texas-----
Reply to
Andy Asberry

Site Timeline Threads

HomeOwnersHub website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.