Best concrete for setting locast posts ?

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Because I used rocks inside the holes to stabilize the posts before the pour. Wetter concrete assured me I had complete concrete saturation around and under those rocks. No cavitation due to too dry a mix for that situation. I used the inverted mushroom hole type. No gravel on bottom.
Stabilized bottom with suitably sized rocks, then top allowing at least 2" above that topmost rock to concrete surface. Used level for plumb both ways.
After the pour, I re-checked plumb and made minor adjustments if needed.
I did the tensioning posts similarly, except, I used a 3/4" offset stringline for alignment with corners bottom and top. Stringline used for rough, removed, then installed again after pour for final alignment. Of course, the 90 degree opposite direction plumb was with a level.
A few neighbors in the area said to go with 5000 psi bagged concrete instead of the 3000 psi version. They said they had no cracking problems with it over time. Makes sense as sometimes 2 feet or more of the limestone rocks will displace when using a rock pick or auger at the surface. Leaving bigger area (hole) at surface to pour. Can't be helped. So, I used that instead. Dave
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If your posts are dimensional (4x4 or 6x6) the following process worked well for me. If your posts are roundish, then simply set them in the holes with a few inches of gravel in the bottom, and use quickcrete (regular or quick setting - it's up to you.) that has been mixed to a pretty thick consistency. Level the post in all directions and cross-brace for 24 hours before adding attachments.
If using dimentional lumber, the way I did the posts all around my house, is to: 1. String a centerline along the length of the fence run. 2. Dig the hole to desired depth (in my case, 24"). 3. Insert 10" sonnet tube that has been cut to desired length/height. 4. Backfill, leveling the tube along the way. 5. Mix quickcrete (regular or quick setting - It's up to you.) 6. Fill the tube with mixed quickcrete. 7. Set post anchor according to the centerline. 8. After concrete is dry, test fit posts, mark holes, drill holes, and bolt posts into post anchors.
The fence is now over 14 years old. No rot, no leaning.
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You can just pour dry mix around the post.if you wish add a little water on top to speed setting.In a few days it will be hard, meanwhile the dry mix will hold the post in place. Be aware the posts will need to be replaced eventually ,then you will have to deal with the concrete.
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yeah and they fail faster in concrete.
but as a friend says its your back:)
OP can think about this as he digs up his rotted posts and concrete
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the best idea I've seen was in England where the entire post was concrete with slots to put wooden rails in.It was very nice looking and very durable.
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