Attic use

I posted a sketch at alt.binaries.crafts.pictures - same subject. This is the kind of roof support construction in the old abode. Build in the early sixties and getting smaller as the years go by. I would sure like to get some use out of the attic space, but you can hardly walk down the middle. Probably a long shot, but is there any way to re-support the roof without a major construction job and get some usable space up there?
Many thanks!
Sam
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on 9/23/2007 3:26 AM Sammy bin Snoozin said the following:

the kind of roof support construction in the old abode. Build in the early sixties and getting smaller as the years go by. I would sure like to get some use out of the attic space, but you can hardly walk down the middle. Probably a long shot, but is there any way to re-support the roof without a major construction job and get some usable space up there?

The design of the truss is such that it is probably the minimum amount of lumber to hold up the roof. Any removing of lumber will weaken the structure.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Thanks, Bill. Yes, it's a poor dwg but it is a truss. Do you know of a way to strength the roof support and then be able to remove part of the 45 deg pieces?
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Sammy bin Snoozin wrote:

the kind of roof support construction in the old abode. Build in the early sixties and getting smaller as the years go by. I would sure like to get some use out of the attic space, but you can hardly walk down the middle. Probably a long shot, but is there any way to re-support the roof without a major construction job and get some usable space up there?

to strength the roof support and then be able to remove part of the 45 deg pieces?

I am not Bill, but I can answer.
I have done this many times in the past. When someone wants to repair a failure or damage, when someone just wants to make use of the space, or when a remodel in the area below requires removal of truss supports, etc.
I could probably do the math and make the necessary changes to make any attic space structurally sound, and if I do it for myself, that is what I do. When working with other peoples homes, I ALWAYS consult a qualified engineer to design the system that I execute. It is required for a permit, it saves me the anxiety that I may be forgetting something, and it almost always works better my design would have because I will generally overengineer something to be on the safe side.
There are multiple ways to accomplish what you want to do. An engineer can give you options that you may not have considered. The engineer will cost money, but his design can save you as much as he costs, in both time and materials, not to mention, peace of mind.
Never modify a truss or truss system without the advice of an engineer. Trusses are too minimal to begin with.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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