Cleaning Pots And Pans

Hi,
We have a number of pots and pans that have accumulated a layer of "varnish" and black coating over the years. So far only scrubbing with a mild abrasive (soft scrub or baking soda) or a worn Scotch-Brite has made a dent.
Is there a better way?
These include aluminum, anodised aluminum, steel, enamel, teflon coated, and Corningware.
Thanks, Gary
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Hi Gary
Bar Keepers Friend is the BEST non-scratching cleanser I have ever found. It's not as strong as it used to be years ago, but still better than anything else, regarding cleansers.
On rare occassion, I will soak steel and/or iron pots, pans, baking sheets, etc. in a 33% lye solution. It's a pre-mixed and bottled solution of Lewis Red Devil Lye and water. Gets VERY HOT when you mix it, so the plastic bottles must be immediately cooled in a tub of water after adding water to the lye.
At one time I used to have a sandblasting cabinet, this made quick work of cleaning the outsides of iron cookware, hi hi.....
TTUL Gary
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"Gary V. Deutschmann, Sr." wrote:

Adding water to lye can cause loss of eyesight from violent splashing of the caustic substance. Instead, you should add the lye slowly to the water.
Of the materials listed, would lye be appropriate on anything but the Corningware?
Sincerely, Choreboy
Confidential to Mr. Deutschmann: [Sorry for emailing you. It's my goofy newsreader.]
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On Sun, 09 Jan 2005 19:33:32 -0500, Choreboy

I don't understand the film on Corningware. I have the "Just White" Corningware that I've been using for 30 years and it still looks like new. I don't use anything abrasive, just dishwashing soap. Sometimes baking will leave stuck-on dried food, but nothing an overnight soak won't remove.
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wrote:

water.
Corningware?
newsreader.]
Hello someone! Can anyone help me? I have a question.
Is Corningware the same thing as Pyrex ?
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Thank you Phisherman. Gary Deutschmann is obviously a terrorist, trying to convince Americans to add water to lye. What made you suspect that Mrs. Bonk was his confederate? Anyhow, you have exposed her. If she weren't hiding out in a cave in Pakistan, she would know CorningWare is a porcelain-glass composite.
Terrorists hate us because our homes are so clean. That's why AHC is a target.
--
Until next time,
Marcey
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Mon, 10 Jan 2005 19:22:16 -0500, Marcia Pease

Lock me up. I've never heard of CorningWare either!
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wrote in message

Thank You Dawn. I imagine it's one of those things peculiar to America or possibly we call it something else. I have to go shopping now, I will ask in the ironmongers if they have anything similar so I can compare. I have the white pyrex, you know the sort, sometimes with a blue flower or squiggle and clear lid. I suspect it's similar to that. Anyhow I'll let you know if I do see anything.
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I found this picture http://www.comparestoreprices.co.uk/kitchen-accessories/corningware-dish.asp and the text would appear to confirm that it's not been about here long, if at all.
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Hi Choreboy
Although I do agree with you regarding the normal mixing of Lye and water.
For many years my company packaged a liquid solution of Lye and found that adding the Lye crystals to the bottles first, then adding about 2/3 of the water, capping and cooling, then topping off until full, was the safest method in this particular case.
Why? Adding Lye to partially prefilled bottles of water could cause splashing and water getting into the vats of lye crystal.
Doing it the opposite way kept the lye in one room, the water in the next room, etc. People handling the Lye were NOT around water or moisture, so Lye could not stick to wet hands or damp clothing, etc.
After reversing the operation, Lye first, Water second, accidents and spills became non-existant in the workplace. Not one employee ever had a Lye burn doing it backwards!
So, sometimes the proper way of doing something is not necessarily safest way. Then comes OSHA, but that's another 80 page story!
TTUL Gary
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use spray oven cleaner but not on the aluminium items
heat the items under hot water
leave on for 10 minutes
carefull of your eyes and do not leave near children
hth peter
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But cheaper, healthier, and easier yet is fill with hot water, add about a teaspoon of CHEAP hair conditioner, and let it set for a few minutes. Does it every time.
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Hey, I just got finished cleaning the "varnish" off the bottom of my electric skillet. Proctor & Gamble makes a product called Dawn Power Dissolve. You can find it with the dishwashing soap. You spray it on and let it sit. That stuff comes right off. I used it in the corners of my aluminum baking sheets. You know how you get that black stuff you can't scrape out?
This stuff kind of feels like oven cleaner. It's thick. But it really does work. I've used it on everything.
Cindy
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On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 19:31:48 -0600, "teleflora"

Many oven cleaners contain sodium hydroxide, or lye, which should not be used on aluminum products. Sodium hydroxide is a strong alkaline and can dissolve your skin or damage eyes. Anyone know the active ingredient to Dawn Power Dissolve?
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No, but I know it didn't damage my aluminum pans.
Cindy
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http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id 003343
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Thanks Dawn. Great link!!!

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