cleaning kitchen cabinet doors

I want to clean all my kitchen cabinet doors before christmas but wondering what product would work the best. The wood is the fake dark junk -we live in a rental- I tried using pine-sol but since it's been a while that they have been clean pine-sol didn't work getting the build up grime & grease off. In years past I used orange glo with perfect results but cabinets are just getting old and tired out. TIA
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ms. tonya wrote:

I had the same problem with my dark junky old cabinets. A few years back I finally decided to paint the cabinets white using an oil - based semi - gloss paint. It took about ten or so days because I had to apply a LOT of paint, these old cabinets soak it up so I had to apply three or so coats. But the cabinets look pretty good now and they are easy to keep clean, it was a cheap way to get "Euro - style" cabinets. For some reason dark kitchen cabinets really work my nerves, I much prefer white - looks sleeker and cleaner and things are much easier to find in the back of white cabinets than in dark...
If this is an option for you, go for it. Your landlord will probably appreciate your effort, check with them (and they may even help supply the paint)...
As for simply cleaning try that old stand - by ammonia, you can't go wrong. Also I wonder if the TSP (tri - sodium phosphate) that is used to cleanse and prepare surfaces in preparation for painting would work in ridding the gunk?
--
Best
Greg



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You can clean them with odorless paint thinner that can be purchased in any paint store or hardware store. It will remove the greasy cooking film. Then you can wash then with TSP (or Spick-N-Span or one of the TSP alternatives like JoMax) that is also found in the paint department. Of course, it won't make them look like new. After they are clean, you might try using a product by Minwax called "Wood Sheen." It comes in many colors and is a combination stain and finish that you rub on with a soft cloth. It will help revive the look of the cabinets after they are clean. Another alternative is a products called "Restore-A-Finish." It is also available in a variety of colors and is a liquid that is applied with a soft cloth. I have used both on wood and fake wood with good results. The Wood Sheen is probably better for fake wood and is easier to find as Minwax products are sold everywhere.
I once refinished the cabinets in a rental. If you are up to it and your landlord agrees, it can make them look like new. Refinishing is more than a weekend project if you are going to do it right. I also refinished my cabinets in my home a couple years ago. I had them stripped. Then, I sanded and primed them. The next step was two coats of oil-based paint. I then mixed an oil-based glaze and wiped that on. Finally, I applied two coats of oil-based polyurethane. You can see some pictures here: http://tinyurl.com/86aqr
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I have lupus and get allergic reactions to lots of things, so I'm afraid to try the paint thinner. Is there a nontoxic alternative? Melinda
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