Pocket doors

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When is it appropriate to use a pocket door?
I have a corridor that will remain open 90% of the time as a corridor, but 10% of the time I may close off the corridor on both ends to form a closed off room.
Right now it is serving this function by using two swing doors. Since I am doing some remodeling in the adjacent rooms, I thought may be I should consider using pocket doors for both to make it look cleaner when the doors are not necessary they are out of sight. Is this a proper use of a pocket door?
Where would you locate the light switch since 32" of the wall would have to be dedicated to the cavity of the door, I have to move it to the other side right? but if the other side is an exterior wall with practically no room due to a window being there, I don't see an easy solution.
MC
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Where 1) the door swing or door parking station is a problem, and 2) where the wall can accept a pocket easily, and 3) you need or want doors, and 4) there isn't a local humidity issue (for wood doors-they can warp quite a bit over time)

As posed, this is an aesthetic question....It's up to you.

Depends on construction, you may get away with a 1-1/2" box, which can usually fit at a pocket...depends on the wiring logic.
--


MichaelB
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On 30 Jul 2007, Michael Bulatovich wrote

-snip-
There's also another solution to this problem which can work when the width of the door opening is the width of the corridor -- building a recess into the wall of the corridor so that when the hinged door(s) swings back, it aligns with/becomes part of the corridor wall.
I've seen that in 18th-century houses and in 1960s' designs; done carefully, it can make for a pleasingly elegant detail.
--
Cheers, Harvey
Architectural and topographical historian
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Ah, I get it - yes, that *could* be a nice Artisan detail. Very "Montecello" so to speak: high-skill cabinetry. You see that sort fo "tuck-away closure" in certain very fine woodworking. IMO a very interesting idea :)
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On 03 Aug 2007, Kris Krieger wrote


I think I first saw it as a solution to inter-connecting doors through a thick (former exterior) wall: the opening and doors were formed so that the doors became part of the panelling of the intermediate walls. Very pleasing effect.
--
Cheers, Harvey
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HVS wrote:

I've seen it done as nice panelled pocket doors in an apparently paneled wall, and I've seen pocket paneled door. With tightly recessed bottom and top tracks or channels, panels can, depending on how they are constructed, truly cut off some noise. Sometimes there has to be redundancy in the supplies and returns, depending how large the divided space, or what is being concealed..
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Yeah, but you're going to need real *craftsmen*.
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On 03 Aug 2007, Michael Bulatovich wrote


Ta-roo -- but it's a lovely detail if you can manage it.
(What? You don't do your own cabinetry work? For shame....)
--
Cheers, Harvey
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So where does the door knob go, or is this only for one of those push/pull doors?
--
Edgar



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On 03 Aug 2007, Edgar wrote

I think the old ones I've seen either worked a hand-hold into the moulding or used a smallish, relatively unobtrusive knob. (The rear knob would fit into the recess, of course.)
It's been a number of years since I saw the 1960s' version, but I seem to recall it used a flush ring-pull handle.
--
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You used to just tilt a proximate bust of Aristotle to operate them in either direction.
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Actually, I do, and thus I speak from experience.
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Michael Bulatovich wrote:

Problem is, there are real crafts/men/women out there. But in order to get them, sometimes you have to put a language communications preference for the fore/man/woman into the contract in order to get the quality details communicated to the crafts/man/woman.

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With things the way they are, these people are busy, no matter what language they speak..
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On 03 Aug 2007, Michael Bulatovich wrote

And interestingly -- at least in the UK -- the top sub-contracting artisans -- stonework, joiners, paint specialists -- don't actually charge ridiculous prices.
It's a very small world, but the really good ones seem to charge *reasonable* prices. That rules them out of competitive tenders, but invariably the lead consultants have to hire them anyway, and there's not a lot of competition. (When there are only a handful of people who can do the job, the issue comes down to "When you can fit this in?" rather than "Can you beat their price?")
--
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Indeed. When I was doing really expensive residential work in the late 90's we had painters who used to work in Manhattan and elsewhere in 'the north-east' and the schedule revolved around when they could fit it in. They were worth waiting for.....the things they could do with paint!
On one job we had them paint dirt and smoke stains between the dentils on the gleaming new plaster cornices around some principal rooms....in others they used a combing technique that required incredibly steady hands and made the walls look like they were corduroy.....unbelievable craftsmen. I could have watched them for hours.
--


MichaelB
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Thanks - I have the site up now - I like his work :) Even in the things that look "simple", there are all sorts of little details that a subtle but elegant - and I definitely hesitated using that word, because it's become so cliche'd, but it does apply, and I can't think of a better one.
Those curved dovetail joints really catch me. THe "logo tabe" is also striking.
I also like that his work is "contemporary" (clean lines) without having that sterile, hard, cold feel I get from so much of what is called contemporary, and so much of what shows up in, er, "catalogues".
Actually, to be honest, I usually might like a couple things by aperson, but it's rare for me to like so much of a person's work. I like the way he can combine the curve/arch with clean lines, while still, at the risk of sounding corny, "hold true to the warmth of the wood".
Now, if I could take the feel of his work, and combine it with some rough Stone structural elements, and/or maybe a few ancient-feeling artifacts, well, *wow*...
At any rate, I'm really enjoying his gallery - this is a keeper, thanks for the link!
- Kris
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Pass it around....I'm sure he could always use more work.
--


MichaelB
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Well, the last sentence unfortunatley holds all too true...
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am
doors
to
side
If at all possible I'd suggest making the pocket door wall/cavity a 2"x6" Timberstrand wall. This will allow for the switch as well as minimize warping issues down the road.
HTH,
Michael (LS)
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