Can I Sue My Architect if Zoning doesn't pass?

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In a way, that's part of what I'm not clear on, to be honest. I know that Don is a Designer, because he knows a lot and can design a place and have his documentation accepted. And I know that architects also generally design - take client ideas and turn them into structures. The main difference seems to be that one is licensed, whereas the other is not. ((One cannot automatically assume depth of knowledge in all areas on the part of either, so any client would have to do a lot fo homework.))
But it seems that, OTOH, some architects seem (from what I've been ablet oto gather) on engineering. So would they then team up with a designer? Does one work with the other or are they mutually exclusive? As in, would Sam Smith AIA look at Joe Smith Designer and say, He doesn't even have a license, I'm not gonna work with him...
Or in fact would there ever even be a circumstance at all where a designer (unlicensed but knowledgeable) would work with an AIA type?

So shifting over to 3D, tipocwise, it is not all that useful, then.

Ah, I see. SO if someone fro another place likes your work, they can still hire you to do the design, and then, as you point out:

Oh, OK, that makes sense. Because each type (medical, hotel, residential) has various factors that the designer (or design team?) has to take into consideration.

OK, that helps clarify things to me.

Not at all! I didn't think about the many possible types of design and designers.

So in your office, it's a part of the required "tool box" so to speak...

Yeah, it does. My orioginal question was, I realize, awfully vague, but all the various answers are giving me more insight into the workings.. thanks!
- Kris
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Don (not trying to speak for him)is able to design residential and some small commercial under a certain square footage (someone help me out on this one!) without having a license. Anything over that magic number requires a licensed architect to work on it.
SNIP

Definitely. Happens all the time.
SNIP

After doing this for quite a few years, I've found my own process that I feel comfortable with. Always begins with sketches, and then (depending on the schedule of the project or the level of developement required) go directly into CAD. Sometimes I don't even bother with 2D drawings other than plan drawings. I've even skipped the plan part and went straight from sketch to 3D for a REALLY quick study for a client. The 3D file can be used for elevations and sometimes sections depending on the level of detail incorporated. I've been looking at softwares like REVIT, but the current versions out there could not handle the complexities and size of the projects I work on. I'm sure that will changing in the near future. I'm all for getting rid of 2D drawings in CAD completely. Every drawing created from one file, now that's my kind of software. ;-)
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