wood mold study

had some stacked scraps outdoors and noticed was surprised to find out which ones grew mold and to what degree
douglas fir had some but not a lot and it was whitish redwood had tiny amount and was whitish bamboo had the most and was blackish pine had blackish and whitish eucalpytus had some whitish on the bark but not the wood
thought bamboo would be resistant just due to the tolerance it has to wet environments but since it is a monocot and quicker to grow it may be quicker to break down
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I'd spray them down - in the areas with bleach or wipe it. Another is a mold killer. The other thing - baking soda. Better likely. It changes the PH and kills the mold.
White is common on Oak.
If the redwood is all red (no yellow sap wood) it isn't perfect. Sap goes first then the heart wood. The bark has tons of tanninc acid in it to keep off most things.
The neat thing - I used to have acreage with about 100 coastal trees to 160' or so and the birds - crows and such Jays mostly place acorns into the bark after picking a hole in it and come back the next year. It pickles the acorn and the worm inside. Then they eat the whole thing.
Martin
On 2/23/2017 7:32 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

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TANGENT ALERT
My first wood mold was 35 years ago. I made a simple conical bullet mold by pinning two pieces of wood together, and drilling the seam with a proper size drill bit at a high RPM and modest feed rate. Then I lightly carbonized the cavity with a butane lighter. I found I could make about 50 bullets before they started to get a little to tight to feed into my old .45 Pennsylvania style cap and ball rifle. Linen patched of course. I just wanted cheap bullets so I could afford powder and caps so I could shoot my rifle, but they shot better than I expected. They held 3 inch groups off a rest at 75 yards. Not awesome, but shootable. Commercial roundballs in the same rifle would shoot an overlapping cloverleaf pattern at the same range. Still. They worked. I did find if I upped hte powder charge slightly they seemed to shoot a little beter, but for just target practice and fun shooting I shot them with a pretty light powder charge.
Anyway, that's about the simplest wood mold to study I know of. I wonder if my dad still has any of them laying around.
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On Thu, 23 Feb 2017 19:46:43 -0600

taking the cheap and easy way out and separating and exposing to sunlight
if the mold went deep then it gives the piece character if not then it just gets sanded off later

the redwood showed no mold but maybe i need to look closer

woodpeckers do that too
the jays are significant for new recruitment of trees
the acorns they place in the ground sometimes are forgotten and become oak trees
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