Sharpening Stones

Check out John's post on abpw, "Mans Ingenuity".
http://www.delorie.com/wood/abpw/
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Sonny wrote:

Thanks for that link. I see that stuff on the internet never really goes away. There was ol' Lew! I miss him.
BTW what was that first picture supposed to depict?
--
GW Ross








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On Thursday, July 20, 2017 at 10:21:20 AM UTC-5, G Ross wrote:

Looks like an old drill (upside down) with a pulley attached/chucked up, the belt of which would drive the lower pulley, which has a grinding stone on the arbor/axle (left side).... all attached to a backboard (metal plate?), mounted on the wall.
Sonny
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Sonny wrote:

That's a fancy pencil holder... : )
Bill
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"Puckdropper" wrote in message

Any system will work... that said, I mostly use Arkansas bench stones though I do have some course artificial stones to put relief in edges. Most of the stones I bought about 30 years ago and added a large black stone maybe 15 years ago. I also have a two wheel slow speed vertical grinder, a slow speed vertical grinder with a course wheel, a horizontal blade/knife grinder with water drip, angle grinder, valve grinder, and myriad files, slips, and other specialty stones. I acquired different sharpening items as the needs arose. I'm now set up to sharpen everything from kitchen knives to hand and powered woodworking tools, lawn mower blades, chainsaw chains, brush cutting blades, brush hooks, ditch bank blades, shovels, picks, post hole diggers, loppers, saws, etc. I must say that there is something special about being able to shave the hair off your arm with a machete. ;~)
If you buy a good set of large Arkansas stones they'll last you a lifetime without flattening if you use the whole stone rather than hollowing out some areas through repeated use of those areas. Yes it will cost you $200.00-300.00 for a bench set of large soft, medium, hard, and black hard stones but viewed as a lifetime investment it's not so bad. Avoid buying the less expensive stones... they are either too small and limited when it comes to working on plane irons and large knives, or the thin ones are that are glued to a wooden base only have one usable side. A large course artificial stone speed up creating relief or repairing damaged tools. I've got a large Norton stone for such purposes but a good quality diamond stone would be a fine substitute.
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Growing up in our family grocery store we used a triple stone setup with a mineral oil basin below. My dad taught me how to hold and sweep a knife to get a nice straight 20 degree edge. It took a lot of practice, but even now when I sharpen a knife on a stone the edge taper is nice and flat. Some may argue that it should be 17, and others may argue that some should be 25, but I found the 20 degree edge (or the edge I felt was 20 degrees) held up very well with only boning knives needing to be resharpened very often. We had a steel, but it was never used or needed. We simply did not get rolled edges. All the knives in our meat department were modestly inexpensive Forschner knives except for one elcheapo fillet knife I had a shallower angle on and used for showing off to cut tomatoes paper thin with a single swipe. Again, except for the boning knives I almost never had to do more than dress the edges of the blades with the finest of the three stones. Even the boning knives rarely needed more than that. Usually only after training a new meat cutter, or if I had been on vacation for a few weeks. These were knives that got used for work every single day. They were not my private set. These were communally used by every single person who worked in the meat department.
If I saw somebody using a steel on a knife I knew I would have a little more work to do on that knife. It was a sure sign they had taken the knife to the stones and changed my edge geometry.
The key in my opinion to most knives is to figure out the best edge geometry for your use and maintain the blade. It may vary depending on how you use it. Remember a thin edge does cut easier and faster, but it also rolls and wears easier and faster. I keep most of my knives at 20 degrees, but I do have about a 25 degree edge on my parang as it mostly gets used for chopping brush and wood. Yes, my fish fillet knives are shallower, but I also have to touch up the tip where it bumps along the ribs more often.
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"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
For stuff I do not want touching up my oil stones I rough them on a bench sander, and finish with some cheap crap Diamond hones I got from Harbor Freight. The diamond hones also work nicely for finishing hand ground cobalt HSS lathe bits.
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*snip*
I had some trouble with that the other day. I was thinking about building a jig, but what makes things hard is my pocket knife has a gentle curve at the end (like many do). Do you have any suggestions, or could you go into detail about the technique you use?
I was just looking for knife sharpening information last night. Good timing. :-)
Puckdropper
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A mini archive of some of rec.woodworking's best and worst!
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"Puckdropper" wrote in message

*snip*
I had some trouble with that the other day. I was thinking about building a jig, but what makes things hard is my pocket knife has a gentle curve at the end (like many do). Do you have any suggestions, or could you go into detail about the technique you use?
I was just looking for knife sharpening information last night. Good timing. :-)
Puckdropper *********************** I visualize the blade sitting on a wedge. As you sweep around the curve the back of the blade picks up and sweeps back slightly, but the angle from the contact point to the back of the blade in a line along the stone remains the same. Most people have a problem with that part and they get a shallower angle on the curve of the blade. Its sharper, but it folds over easier.
The line that you use to determine your angle should be perpendicular to the tangent of the curve at the contact point with the stone. LOL.
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Bob La Londe wrote:

Is proper sharpening achieved by rotating the blade as you draw it across the stone--so that you maintain this angle?
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"Bill" wrote in message

Is proper sharpening achieved by rotating the blade as you draw it across the stone--so that you maintain this angle?
*************************
I don't know if its "proper" but it’s the way I have done it for over 40 years. Actually rotate the knife and lift the handle slightly. If you don't then you may wind up dragging the blade along the edge of the stone and destroying the edge you just worked so hard on. Yeah, I've done that too. LOL.
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Bob La Londe wrote:

TYVM
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On Wednesday, July 26, 2017 at 11:33:04 AM UTC-5, Bob La Londe wrote:

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That was a great post, Bob.
I learned to sharpen free hand when I was a very young kid, as my Dad got m e a knife early on and checked it often to make sure I kept it sharp. He s ubscribed to the "sharp knives don't cut people, but dull knives do". I ha d a knack for it, and always had a knife in my pocket, even in elementary s chool, and it was always sharp.
My affair with my cutlery goes on today. Learning to sharpen free hand has made me able to sharpen, hone or touch up just about any knife to shaving sharp after I set the bevel I want.
I have really enjoyed the newer steels that are out now and have all kinds of them. Some are beyond hard and require diamond hones to sharpen. My hun ting and kitchen knives are all stainless, but not that hard as I sharpen t hem frequently on my 1200gr diamond rod to keep them as sharp as possible.
I agree with your comment to sharpen to the use for the knife, as I put dif ferent angles on many of my knives based on their use. Hard use knives (my daily work knives that get all the crap work on the job) have fairly blunt angles on them. My kitchen cutters have pretty low angles to slice meats and veggies and the steel is soft enough (probably around 56 on the Rockwel l) that they are easy to resharpen. Like you, due to the way I sharpen I d on't have edge roll.
Not too many folks can sharpen a knife well these days, and even fewer can do it free hand. I sharpen knives for some of my friends, and when they br ing me their knives we are both embarrassed by how dull they are. Try as I might, I can't get them to sharpen properly. A great deal of the problem is that they won't practice to build the muscle memory needed to cut the ed ge bevels the same on both sides. It works out, though. I sharpen their kn ives, and they keep me in some really nice cigars!
Robert
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*snip*

I made a simple jig that helped quite a bit. All it is is simply a block of wood cut to the desired angle. Placed at one end of the stone, the knife is placed against the stone and jig and that angle is held through the stroke.
There's a commercial version out there, but it only takes two cuts on the saw to make.
Puckdropper
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A mini archive of some of rec.woodworking's best and worst!
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On Saturday, July 29, 2017 at 3:07:13 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com wrote:

Yes, here's a picture similar to the one I keep in the kitchen. You only have to keep the blade straight up and down to get the right angle. I attach water stones to mine with a rubber band.
https://cdn.instructables.com/FAI/YQNC/HMVJA8W8/FAIYQNCHMVJA8W8.RECT2100.jpg
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On 7/29/2017 2:09 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: Snip

So uh, I was in the back yard surveying the new sprinkler system that we had installed on Monday. Along the back fence and near one of the pop-up misters I saw a wire sticking out of the ground about 10". I walked over and pulled on it thinking that it was a piece that did not get picked up during the install. It did not give at all.
Humm, did they cut through one of the many cables that are in that section of easement? Looking closer I thought I saw a center wire. Well, it was obviously cut and me cutting the exposed section was not going to do any more harm.
So in a fashion similar to rolling a wire along the edge of your knife to cut through and strip the insulation, I proceeded. OUCH!
It was a root!
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