Recommend work bench thickness

What is the minimum recommended bench top thickness when using bench-dogs or other types of hold-fasts?
I'm replacing the top of my work table with some 1.25 inch thick butcher block. I'd like to add some 3/4 inch holes for hold fasts.
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On Sat, 20 Oct 2018 17:31:36 -0700 (PDT), Clark Moss

Thickness doesn't matter a whole lot for bench dogs. A Black and Decker Workmate has a 3/4" thick top and they work fine. Where you might have a problem is with the holdfasts--1.25 is a bit thin for them.. Try them and see if they hold, if they don't then fasten a block underneath and drill it through to increase the thickness.
You might find this of interest: <http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/store/blog/251/title/Some%20Tips%20on%20Using%20Our%20Gramercy%20Holdfasts
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On 10/20/2018 7:31 PM, Clark Moss wrote:

My Festool Work table uses 3/4" MDF and it works fine. Mostly it will depend on what size and kind of dogs you intend to use. Might be less expensive to get a new type of hold down than to go thick for a surface.
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Especially considering the butcher block was free.
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(PDT) typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    Free is a very good price.
    Now, how much are you spending to get it home, set up, stable .... "asking for a friend".*
    *I snagged two solid core doors. two inches thick. Great bench. But after the last re-organization, I need to make some serious legs for the one. Before, when I "pushed" on it, I was pushing the bench against the wall. Now I'm not, and it "wiggles". One more thing ...
tschus pyotr
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
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On 10/20/2018 8:31 PM, Clark Moss wrote:

That is plenty thick. I use 3/4" because it is what I had but would prefer 1".
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... not 3/4 inch butcher block, I bet ? John T.
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On 10/21/2018 2:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

No, plywood. If was a home made drafting table where I worked many years ago. When the didn't want it any more I converted it to a workbench. Free is a good price.
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Thank you all for the feedback. This is encouraging and makes me excited to start this project. My grandpa passed 20+ years ago. I got three slabs of butcher block from his shop last winter, with no plans in mind. This idea started kicking around last week when I realized the three slabs are the perfect size.
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On Saturday, October 20, 2018 at 7:31:39 PM UTC-5, Clark Moss wrote:

or other types of hold-fasts?

block. I'd like to add some 3/4 inch holes for hold fasts.
Free butcher block? Great I would think about using it also. BUT you wil l have the end grain up, which means any spills are going right down into t he top. I much prefer the Rubo style of 2.75 to 3.5 inches. You get the w eight to provide a lot more stability to your bench, assuming you put reaso nable legs on it.
What you could do is use the butcher block and top it with a second top of about 1.5" thick with the side grain up. Two advantages, 1) its a whole lo t easier to handle than a 3" solid top and 2) you do not have the end grain wicking up anything that drop on it.
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Not necessarily: http://www.grizzly.com/products/Grizzly-Maple-Butcher-Block-72-x-24-x-2-1-4-/T21249
http://cdn2.grizzly.com/pics/jpeg1000/t/t21249-f53933844522633f7e2d472a40751283.jpg
http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2018/main/341?p41
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That was my first thought also - until I looked up butcher block :
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butcher_block
" two basic styles of butcher block: end grain and edge grain:
John T.
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On Monday, October 22, 2018 at 9:49:39 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

The same holds for cutting boards. They say end grain is better because the knife "opens" the grain instead of trying to cut through. Your knives stay sharpen longer.
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Luckily it's edge grain butcher block. It's pine or fir, so it's gong to get beat up quick. But again... Free, and in better shape than the maple 1x8s on there now. Next I need to research dog hole spacing and how many you really need. I'm sure that depends on the project.
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Shannon Rogers' prospective. YMMV...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjEK6sywHU8

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Fantastic! Covers all the bases. I don't have a vise right now and he covers hole placement without a vise. Great video!
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On 10/23/2018 2:47 AM, Clark Moss wrote:

I built my bench in 1975 and it has a fir butcher block top I made out of construction grade 2x4's ripped in half and glued up. I figured the top would get beat up and would be easily and cheaply replaced or sanded down. After 43 years of use and abuse, I never needed to replace it, or sand it down.
All the wear and tear (not all that much considering it's cheap softwood) is a romantic reminder of the 43 years of hard work spent together and I wouldn't remotely consider replacing or removing it's hard earned patina.
http://jbstein.com/Flick/bench03.JPG
--
Jack
Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions.
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On 10/23/2018 11:14 AM, Jack wrote:

Yeah, that has a nice patina. Easy to do if you have 40+ years.
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On Saturday, October 20, 2018 at 7:31:39 PM UTC-5, Clark Moss wrote:

I believe a workbench should be solid and massive. Heavy so it does not move when you plane boards. My bench is about 2' x 8' and 2.5" thick. Red oak. It doesn't move. I wish I had made it an inch thicker.
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