Portable CNC

Has anyone bought the Shaper Origin yet?
I see that the Festool parent company, the one that bought SawStop, has now acquired the Shaper Origin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I bought a Shaper Origin when it became available. I think it is a well made machine by a well made company.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

https://www.shapertools.com/
I just peed a little ...
John T.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/22/2019 6:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

I know right? Like when I bought my Domino 11 years ago. Jeez has it been that long? 6,000 plus domino tenons later I still love it, and with DC it still looks new.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/22/2019 4:18 PM, Leon wrote:

So I guess you'll not be picking one up at Harbor Freight anytime real soon now... :)
I hadn't heard of it before -- and didn't have time to do more than just glance at the video so...at the risk of the obvious, how does this thing work as being handheld?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2019 2:06 PM, dpb wrote:

How does it work? Expensively...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2019 1:25 PM, John McGaw wrote:

It is not for every body but will aid woodworkers that are in a small production setting. I thought the Domino was expensive 11 years ago but as it turns out it has afforded me the opportunity to boost my production speed many times over. I have cut in excess of 10,000 mortises with it. Think about how long it would take to cut just 1,000 mortises on a traditional mortiser... ;~) I can accurately cut a clean mortise as quickly as cutting a slot with a plate joiner.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2019 5:53 PM, Leon wrote:

Especially if you cut 4000 of them in the last 4 hours...
--
Jack
Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/24/2019 6:16 AM, Jack wrote:

LOL... Yeah. I do not think I have had a run of mortises that totaled much over 2~3 hundred mortises at one time. While the Domino, the smaller one I have, is much like a plate joiner in size, it is relatively heavy. It does not feel heavy until I have cut a 100 plus mortises. At that point I take a break and rest my right arm and hand. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, June 23, 2019 at 2:06:12 PM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

I have the same question. The main video looked the user was simply following a pattern while looking through a viewfinder. Having a pattern to follow is nice, but you still gotta follow it. What am I missing?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2019 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The Spindle/motor portion of the tool moves independently, on it's own, of your guidance. You only keep the circle on the screen on the line to follow. The spindle/motor moves X,Y,Z on its. own. Watch a few video's and you will notice that the motor moves around in different directions to stay dead on course. If you veer of too much the spindle will raise automatically and not misscut.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2019 4:58 PM, Leon wrote:

You have to watch closely to see the spindle move independent of the operator's movements. Compare the motor to the clear guard.
Anyway the link below shows one of the cool features.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlZV4PXHSSU

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2019 1:06 PM, dpb wrote:

Probably not.

It is basically a router in a computerized holder. The front top has a camera to view the special dotted tape on the work and a video screen to see the field.
You import drawings of what you want to cut or design on the onboard screen and then cut.
The design shows a projected path to take and you follow that path. You provide the coarse adjustment/movement and the onboard computer provides the the fine resolution adjustments. There is a circle on the screen and you simply push the tool so that the circle is over the path on the screen. While the circle in on the path the tool will adjust itself within that circle to cut in the correct location. The spindle/motor moves independently of your guidance. If you go too far off course the spindle will raise and not cut where it is not suppose to cut.
It is basically a portable CNC machine. It has unlimited travel, being portable. You can engrave a whole wood floor in a room.
Pricey, $2500. but a CNC can cost you tens of thousands of $s and you are limited to the CNC's platform size.
Like the SawStop this tool has been floating around for 4~5 years in limited production batches. It apparently is now available and ready for prime time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2019 4:49 PM, Leon wrote:

...
OK, makes sense. I hope they've got a lot better videos than that one I watched to illustrate how it works--that one is pretty-much useless to illustrate the machine (although the helper was/is nice eye candy).
Presuming it does work (as appears to) well, doesn't seem exorbitant for that kind of technology and if one were doing that kind of engraving professionally agree could easily pay for itself on one job.
Probably not too many just recreational/hobbyists will spring, but then again, you can drop that much on a TS or other stationary machine pretty easily, too, so they'll probably sell quite a few...
Be interesting to see if volume sales will bring price down some altho one would expect not in near term and with the Festool pricing history already to support it, they'll undoubtedly try to recap development costs quickly for a while...
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2019 8:32 PM, dpb wrote:

If you go straight to YouTube and search Shaper Origin you will see a lot of demo's and pros using the tool. I was in particular interested in the flooring guy. He was using the tool to make and inlay medallions on a pretty complex floor. I;m thinking it would make quick work for inlay work on boxes and or sign making. And obviously odd shaped furniture parts. I often have large radius arcs on my furniture. I print out multiple templates on paper, align and glue those templates to the work, cut with a jigsaw or band saw, and then sand, sand, sand.

Agreed, even a small traditional CNC machine starts in that range.

Yeah. LOL

As I have mentioned I have been watching this tool evolve, like the SawStop. When I first saw it on line it was being offered like a beta version and you could preorder for less then $1800 IIRC. As time passed the tool was improved and the price continued to go up. IIRC I saw the last preproduction version offered just a few weeks ago and it was a few hundred dollars less.
With that said the web site, a few years ago, indicated that this tool was being partnered with Rockler, AutoDesk, and Festool. IIRC this tool was originally a Kick Start idea, I think. also I believe I read that The parent company of Festool acquired the tool only a few months ago, again I think.
So, I believe this tool will actually be around for quite some time. It got the interest of a large company and sold it. It really fills a niche for many Pro's.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.