Poplar

More expensive than I expected.
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On Fri, 23 Feb 2018 16:43:39 -0800 (PST), Michael
Less so than most hardwood. That's why it's poplar.
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On Friday, February 23, 2018 at 7:51:02 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Groan
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On Friday, February 23, 2018 at 7:43:52 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

What are you using it for?
Some lumber yards sell finger jointed poplar which is much cheaper, but still poplar, so it takes paint very well. The 1 x 6's I recently bought were truly finger jointed (finger joints seen on the edges, cross-wise glue joints on the face. The 1 x 8's were edge glued boards, made up of 1" - 2" strips, i.e. glue joints running the length of the boards. It was all classified as finger jointed in their system, as opposed to "clear poplar".
I found that when gluing up some panels with the 1 x 8's, my glue joints were stronger than the factory glue joints.
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On Friday, February 23, 2018 at 7:52:27 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I'll definitely remember that next time. If I had more lead time, I would have made a trip to the lumber mill and bought it rough. I am making a frame for a painting. The artist wants to paint it too.
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On Friday, February 23, 2018 at 11:42:24 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

Just to be clear...
Finger jointed (or edge glued) poplar is not rough. It's S4S just like the clear Poplar. At least stuff I can get is. I just used some for the face frames and doors of 2 base cabinets.
One caution: Be aware of where the glue joints are. I ripped a piece of the edge glued poplar down for a door style. I then cut the grove for the panel. After I assembled the door I realize that the groove ended right at a glue joint so there was no longer any support under it. The glue joint split open. I injected some glue in the split and used some thin strips of - wait for it - Poplar as "horizontal spring clamps" while the glue dried. If you zoom on the outlined area, you can sort of tell where I glued the glue joint back together.
https://i.imgur.com/6X3Q1Fw.jpg?1
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On 2/23/2018 10:42 PM, Michael wrote:

For a while I used to buy rough cut lumber and even S2S. Now days my time is worth much more than the cost to take odd sized lumber and make it usable, especially when I am selling my work. I am not going to charge a customer the cost for "me" to mill the lumber when the cost of S4S is a fraction more in cost.
Getting uniform sized S4S is also a big time saver when planning how much to buy and how to cut it.
As your have found out, your mistake was not getting the cost of materials before quoting a price.
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On Saturday, February 24, 2018 at 11:23:17 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:

Family member, free of charge.
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On 2/24/2018 1:08 PM, Michael wrote:

Sounded like a customer. ;~) That changes everything. LOL
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Used in trim and special areas. Easy to paint. No sap. Pine is bad for this. I used some in cabinets.
Martin
On 2/23/2018 7:52 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

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Cost depends upon grade, where and how much you buy. Select around $1.80, #1 common around $1.30/
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On Saturday, February 24, 2018 at 6:17:02 AM UTC-6, dadiOH wrote:

It was by linear board foot but ballpark much closer to $1.80. It all worked out but I'll know to buy rough next time. Thanks.
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On Saturday, February 24, 2018 at 2:13:38 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

What is your definition of "rough" in this specific case? i.e. If you were to make these frames again, what exactly would you buy?
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On Saturday, February 24, 2018 at 1:56:04 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

At the sawmill, unplaned. I just check the prices. 8/4 poplar is $2.63 bf.
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On 2/24/2018 4:05 PM, Michael wrote: ...

That's likely green, too...altho, "Oh! to have a sawmill within 300 mi again!"
--


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I was just at the Borg today and happened to see the Poplar rack. It's about $5/bf. It didn't look much like black walnut, either.
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On Sunday, February 25, 2018 at 4:16:48 PM UTC-6, dpb wrote:

It's kiln dried at that saw mill. If I think if it, I'll check it with a moisture meter. It's 36 miles away.
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wrote:

Years ago I bought some freshly sawn poplar to use as batten strips. I asked the sawyer, jokingly, how long I needed to dry it before using it. He looked up in the air, thought a second, and said to just lean it up against the house until tomorrow. He said poplar was open grain and the water would run right out the bottom.
I figured he was pulling my leg, so went home and unloaded, but did lean a few boards up against the house while I went to lunch. A couple hours later I came out and there were puddles under each board. I leaned all the rest of the stack up against the house, and handled some nice light boards a day or two later. 35 years later I was back to visit the old house, and the battens were still in place. I didn't think poplar would weather that well, but it did.
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