Plywood Thickness for chair seat?

Does it matter whether I use 1/2 or 3/4?
1/2 would be lighter 3/4 would be a little stronger and take a staple better
I don't see that it much matters, but never having done this before I don't want to do it and find out it did. I've done that a few times already on this project...
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"Toller" wrote in message

don't
Frame, or solid?
On frame w/webbing chair seats I plane poplar down to 5/8" for the frame.
3/4" plywood, heavily padded works just dandy.
But for a bit more comfort try 1/2" plywood, with a slotted seat portion, for a little flex/give.
My favorite, if using an upholstered seat, is a frame made of 5/8" poplar, with webbing covered by the appropriate amount of modern padding and then the upholstery. Here's a picture of the bare frame, sans webbing, etc. to give you an idea of what I'm talking about:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/SeatFrame2.JPG
What I strongly advise is that after spending that much time on chairs, you really want to do some research and maybe some prototyping of different approaches before a final decision is made.
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Didn't know frame was even an option!

What do you mean slotted seat portion?

Didn't know it was this complicated. Neither of my chair books got into this. Thanks.
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"Toller" wrote in message

You simply cut multiple slots (front to back) about 1/4" - 1/2" wide and maybe 8" - 10" long, where your buns would be.
This imitates, after a fashion, the webbing of a traditional horse hair padded seat and does add a good deal of comfort.

Welp ... it's where the rubber hits the road, in a manner of speaking, and comfort is an important aspect of chair design.
If you don't want your guests to hang around after dinner, use thinly padded 3/4" plywood. ;)
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"Toller" wrote in message

don't
Adding to my previous post:
Michael Fortuned had an article in FWW some time back entitled "A Slim Comfortable Chair Seat" that had an interesting construction, particularly if you're going to do the upholstery yourself:
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesPDF.aspx?id (49
You may have to pony up to download the .pdf if you don't belong, but it you're doing it yourself it would be worth the price of admission, IMO.
He uses a slotted 1/4" plywood seat and the design is ultra thin ... something I've wanted to try myself.
FWIW ... not knowing your chair design, I just thought it might interest you.
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I thought you might like to see what you have been building...
http://www.frontiernet.net/~toller/chair.jpg
Obviously they still need arms. The front legs flare out an inch for the arms.
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"Toller" wrote in message

I like! ... a lot, it's my kind of style - functional, unpretentious and honest(ly), a chair. Can't wait to see the final. Well done.
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Toller wrote:

1. Get two sawhorses and place them with the rails parallel to each other and the distance between the rails the exact distance between the chair legs. 2. Get a very fat neighbor over for "a few beers" 3. Lay a 1/4 sheet of 1/2" play across the sawhorse rails 4. Get fat neighbor to sit on sheet 5. If it bends, get 3/4" sheet and repeat and so on until sheet doesn't bend or sawhorses collapse
FoggyTown
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You're not thinking like an engineer. You get the sawhorses as mentioned before, but if you can't find a fat neighbor, you'll have to get a laser caliper set to measure the displacement between a reference straight edge (square) and the deflection of the chair.
You know, this isn't going to give good data. So, you need the sawhorse and laser caliper, but also a force gauge. Hook the force gauge to the board, and pull it down until it fails. The force and displacement (and $2000 worth of new shiny tools) will then give you an accurate idea of what thickness to use. ;-)
Puckdropper
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