Opinions wanted....

Oliver 24" pattern maker jointer: Paint looks ugly (sawdusty), surfaces lo ok good, runs well. I think the guy will let it go for $2K. He originall y wanted $3500. It's a heck of a lot more jointer than I really want, but for this price, I'm hesitant to let it slip away. I have a week/10 days t o decide.
Scroll right for 4 more pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/3 8298585821/in/dateposted-public/
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
One more pic:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/24428037138/in/dateposted-public/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to Sonny, Iggy wrote: I wouldn't know about that size range. But, I couldn't find anything comparable for less than $3,500...seems like a steal. I'd totally pounce on it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sonny wrote:

Is that an iron bed? Looks awfully thick, almost like granite.
--
G Ross

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09-Nov-17 8:16 PM, Sonny wrote:

...
As mentioned in earlier speaking on some others, there's no such thing as "too much" capacity in a jointer; only whether you've got the room and power to handle the behemoth.
That one is quite old can you tell/does owner know if it still has Babbitt bearings or has been retrofitted? Babbitt in good shape are nothing to be terribly concerned about but if they are in need of attention it's either a DIY project or more of an effort to get new poured rather than just going to the distributor and finding a replacement...
Doesn't look as though has been used much if at all recently as it appears to be a storage table at present... :)
Motor being separate is good; don't have to worry about some of the specialized integral mounts that some had...
What about the PM planer in the background? Is that a 180 or 240? I've got the 180 here...having the wider planer to go with the jointer is also a nice capability, again if have room, of course. And, of course, have to have the dust collection capacity...
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 9:28:41 AM UTC-6, dpb wrote:

Yeah, I looked over the OWWM site for restoring and/or buying old tools, so there are several things I need to inspect, more closely, on this machine: http://web.archive.org/web/20040218205112/www.olivermachinery.com/Restora tion/index.html
I didn't ask, but it seems the seller, or the estate, has inherited an old shop and no one wants to mess with the cache, hence it's been idle for some good time. Seems the guy just wants to unload a burden.
I didn't inquire about the planer.
Seems not too many folks have inquired about many of the tools and even I h ave not looked at any hand tools or other small items, that might be had fo r a nominal cost. I even commented about helping him clean up, to see wha t all he may have, and he commented that that might be appealing towards a discount.
I gathered, his being in any kind of shop is not his forte. He's travelin g from out-of-state to address the selling of the "shop", so he's not readi ly available, for allowing further inspecting. He'll be available Nov 14t h- 20th, so I may decide by then. I had initially contacted him about a mo nth ago, then again a few days ago.
He said one person has offered $1500 for the jointer. I told him that's a low-balled offer
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to Sonny, Iggy wrote: If I were you, I'm thinking I'd be prepared to offer him $4000-$5000 on Nov 14th, to clear out the entire shop to bare walls. If you've got the time and ability to piecemeal things out you don't want or need on Ebay or Craigslist, then it could be a win-win for everyone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10-Nov-17 10:39 AM, Sonny wrote: ...

...

Looks like from the estate point-of-view the executor isn't doing their job to ensure the best interests of the beneficiaries unless he happens to be the sole beneficiary in which case it's just his loss if doesn't get what value can...
Perhaps if you weren't too far away you could be the intermediary and take it on in a commission role or for consideration if this individual isn't up to doing it...
On the jointer and bearings, etc., if it has lubricating cups it'll be Babbitt bearings; early ball-bearing machines may have had lubricating points but would typically have been grease zerks, not oil. If it runs smoothly after all this time and sets a straight edge, I'd not worry much about anything else if castings are intact and it has all the functional pieces like the fence, knife guard, etc., ... I don't know otomh what Oliver was using for knife-mounting at that time but likely it's just the classic wedge but won't have any adjusting springs or the like. That's no deal breaker but does mean setup is a little more painstaking than some of the later...I presume it's probably a 4-knife cutter head?
I had access to an old 24" Crescent or what would appear to be about same general vintage years ago; I surely do miss not having the ability to surface a wide piece in a single pass on occasion -- I'm like you, I'd probably take it simply because it's there. IIRC you had access to easy-enough gear to handle it so you only need to get appropriate power and dust collection. Appearances don't matter to anything except us; the wood really doesn't care so if the tables are in good shape and all you really can hardly go wrong as far as the machine other than the aforementioned bearings and even they _can_ be redone if it were really required. Unless you're going into full-time production it would be highly unlikely you'd have to do anything except occasionally sharpen the knives. Might want to look around and see if there's any sign of a sharpening attachment -- not sure when Oliver might have made one available. If there are any threaded mounting holes in the tables, that's a sign there could have been such; I got luck and got the sharpening attachment thrown in gratis on the PM 180 planar because the person selling it didn't realize what it was at first and when I asked about it, he just said to take it, too...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


What's the problem if your jointer is too big? Just the space it takes up in your shop?
Puckdropper
--
http://www.puckdroppersplace.us/rec.woodworking
A mini archive of some of rec.woodworking's best and worst!
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/9/2017 9:16 PM, Sonny wrote:

if you have a rotary phase converter to power that thing I would go for it. I've only seen upto 16" so that is huge. Do you have any idea how much it weighs, and how you would move it?
If it is babbit, which I assume it is, there are still plenty of guys that can repour them. You just need babbit, an acetylene torch to smoke the shaft and a way to heat the babbit.
They run smoother than ball bearings.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 3:55:21 PM UTC-6, woodchucker wrote:

14th, to clear out the entire shop to bare walls
There's lots of big machinist tools, too much to mess with.

I'd either invest in a phase converter or maybe get a new single phase moto r, if I can. The belt drive might allow for a single phase motor. With s ome research, it weighs about 2600 lbs. Seller says he has equipment avai lable to load it.
Local guy, Phil Arabie, sharpens just about anything, excellent work and in expensive. Set of 16" planer blades for $12, same for my WWII saw blades. Others, on other WW sites, have mentioned his service - Pro. Saw and Tool. Phil's shop is 5 minutes from me. But it'd be nice to have the sharpen ing attachment for the jointer. https://www.google.com/search?q=phil+arabie+sharpening&rlz 1CHBD_enUS 734US734&oq=phil+arabie+sharpening&aqs=chrome..69i57.7887j0j7&sourceid =chrome&ie=UTF-8
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Sonny" wrote in message

I imagine that the sharpening attachment is probably a jointer, i.e., a grinder to keep the knife edges straight between sharpenings. They aren't really intended for sharpening and over jointing tends to leave you without sufficient clearance behind the cutting edge. Big industrial thickness planners often have jointers on them too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 6:28:36 PM UTC-6, John Grossbohlin wrote:

AB Manufacturing made Quicksharp grinders that mount onto the outfeed table. There may be one in that shop, considering all the other tools there. http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id271
Found a video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGi4qLLeXEI

Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.