Jointer Woes

Using my new 6" Delta jointer for the first time and I'm having problems with bowing. For example, when I edge joint 2 40" pieces and lay them edge to edge, I'm getting a gap in the middle of about 1/32". I'm trying to apply most down pressure (but still, not very much pressure) with my left hand just behind the cutter, and my right hand is mostly just pushing the piece through. A straight edge held on the outfeed side shows what looks like the proper gap on the infeed side and it appears consistent. Anyone have any idears what I might be doing wrong?
I have been edge jointing first, then face jointing. I just tried it vice versa and it didn't seem to make any difference.
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I think your knives are set too high. They should be just a hair higher than the outfeed table -- literally just a hair, two or three thousandths of an inch.

It will sure make a difference when you try to get the edge square to the face. Joint the face first, then the edge, with the face held flat against the fence, if you want the edge square to the face.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in Anonymoose

I checked - one was definitely too high, or at least, was higher than the other...not sure if it was too high or the other too low, but I adjusted them so they're the same now anyway. I'll see how that goes.
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You ARE holding the work piece flush not only to the fence but also flush/tight to the outfeed table, right??
John
On Fri, 23 Jan 2004 16:53:31 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

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Si.
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On Fri, 23 Jan 2004 10:23:18 -0600, Anonymoose <Ihatespam> wrote:

adjust your outfeed table.
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It APPEARS to be adjusted properly - at least, a straightedge held on the outfeed table shows a consistent gap over the length of the infeed table. OTOH, the infeed and outfeed tables are pretty short. We're talking about 1/64" over 40 inches. I'm feeling geometricly challenged today, what direction would I want to adjust my outfeed table to compensate for this? Higher at the end, I guess?
I hope I get this squared away quickly (no pun intended), I'm about to run out of parts on my cut list that won't show this problem too badly.
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Aside from adjusting your outfeed table, two things:
1. The first pass, press only LIGHTLY on the board. Just enough to keep it safe, not enough to distort it. This gives you a flat reference for the next pass(es).
2. After the first pass, apply most of your downward pressure just after the cutter (i.e. on the outfeed side).
Oh, and always face joint before edge jointing, as the face acts as a reference for the edge. It's face, plane, edge, rip. FPER for you acronym freaks (AFs ;).
Also, have you checked to make sure your infeed and outfeed tables are coplanar?
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40" with that jointer should be no problem. Several of the other suggestions are good ones.
IMO, you want the outfeed table exactly even with the cutter. I'm assuming you're taking light cuts (1/32" at the most).
Anyway, you really should apply NO downward pressure AT ALL. Let the weight of the wood do the work. I used to try applying pressure like you, just before the cutter, and ended up with anomolous results (bowing, sniping, etc. etc.). It takes a few more passes, all other things being equal, but it gives more consistent results.
As Mr. Delorie points out, you really should do the face first so you have a good reference against the fence when jointing the edge.
Mike
"Anonymoose" <Ihatespam> wrote in message

edge
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Yes - started at 1/32" and backed off to 1/64", for no specific reason.

I'll try that too - before I try adjusting the outfeed table. OTOH, we're talking about 1x4 Walnut so I don't think it's a matter of pressure - given the consistent results - I've done 4 pieces and they're all bowed identically. At least, I don't think I'm leaning on it THAT hard...but anything is possible.

I've switched to that method, does seem to make sense.
Wish this was as easy as using my planer. Thanks.
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Anonymoose <Ihatespam> wrote in

Otay. I zero'd my infeed table and layed (laid?) my alum level equally across the infeed and outfeed table, pressed my hand lightly on the end of the level on the outfeed table end and tapped on the opposite end. When I do this near the fence, I'm getting a tiny bit of rattle which I don't get when I do this opposite the fence. It's just the smallest hint of the tables not being coplaner - and of course it's only on the fence side. Problem is, this is a cheap Delta jointer...how do I adjust the tables? Looks like the bolts just hold the table down, they don't adjust anything. Do I have to shim the table? I can't imagine what I'll use that's that tiny of a shim.
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I don't see how that issue could explain a bowed result like you're seeing, especially when jointing 1/4 walnut.
You could try moving the fence over, and see if you can find a spot where the issue isn't as pronounced.
Mike
"Anonymoose" <Ihatespam> wrote in message

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You use "Feeler Guages" they come in all kinds of sizes (thous. of inches, etc). If you call a machine shop in your area and ask them where they buy theirs from you can get them there. The machine shop might even cut a few of their own and just give you the ends (you don't need very much).
Good luck, I hate having to fiddle with my machines I'd rather just have them "work". In fact I have my dial indicator attached to my table saw to align my trunions. It's been sitting there for a month because I keep avoiding it, I hate it that much...
Mike
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Do go nuts adjusting your table yet, it sounds like your technique needs work. Feed in about 12" of wood then shift all pressure to the out feed table.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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I have the Delta 6" and despite everything I have done to get it to work, I am now convinced that the problem is due to the outfeed table, not technique. Outfeed table seems to have some problems with sagging which gets worse after you loosen the adjustment screws to try to fix it. I saw a post a long time ago from a person that does the warranty rebuilds and he said that shims are the only fix.
I will be installing new knives (OUCH $$$) on mine tomorrow and will go through the entire set-up procedure (again). Will let you know how it comes out.

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I had trouble with mine sagging, And I think I loosened the gibs and picked up on the outfeed table as I tightened the gibs. Tony D.

I
a
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That's explained in the instructions. I also think it's possible to "over do" that leading to the opposite of "sag".
A pretty good "jointer tune-up for dummies" article was posted some time ago. It's pretty lengthy so it you're interested, let me know and I can send it to you via E-mail.

work,
saw
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Good luck. I must have a different model, either that or I'm blind. I have the JT160, which is the bottom of the line model and I don't see any kind of adjustment for the outfeed table - just 4 allen bolts holding it down with nothing between the table and chassis.
I tried different techniques, to the point of applying almost 0 downward pressure and only horizontal pressure to push the piece through - which got my knuckles uncomfortably close to the cutter, even using the pushpads. Anyway, I got identical results, so I don't think that's the issue...
I think I've identified a high spot - or at least that there is a high spot - can't tell if it's on the infeed or outfeed side. If I zero the infeed table, rotate the blade out of the way, place a level across the span, apply slight pressure on the outfeed side and slide it back and forth in an arc on the infeed side, there is a very noticable difference in friction between the fence side and the opposite side - that is to say, on the fence side there is no friction, it just rotates - pivoting on the high spot, versus the opposite side where I get a consistent friction across the arc that feels like constant contact all along the length of the level. I'm going to drop it off to a local delta warranty shop that says they have experience leveling jointer tables...but since there's no adjustment on this puppy, I hope they have a lot of experience. Wish me luck.
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Anonymoose <Ihatespam> wrote in

The shop I want to take it to closed at noon, so I dorked around with it some more (must pick it til it bleeds). It looks like the high spot is on the outfeed table. If I set the infeed table to be almost but not quite zero'd out and slide my level from infeed to outfeed table (like I was feeding a piece), at just the right height there is a discernable 'click' on the fence side (as the piece hits the outfeed table) when there is no 'click' on the opposite side. So, either the outfeed table has a high spot there, or the infeed table has a low spot in front of the cutter head. Unfortunately, I can't tell which from looking at it. Hope the shop has some amazing high-tech gear to scope this out for me...micro this and nano that...somehow, I'm guessing not.
What a pain in the ass.
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i had this same jointer, returned it to lowes no matter what i did, shim the tables, it would always have a gap, bought a cast iron jointer with long tables problem solved for about 200 more dollars...tony
"Anonymoose" <Ihatespam> wrote in message

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