Can I Put A Wet-Dry Vac In A Cabinet?



Or drill two or three 3/4" holes in the back. My electronics cabinet has a number of these with friction-fit small metal round vents.
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On 8/25/2017 12:25 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

You need more than that to vent properly. If you have one outlet equal to the size of the hose, the velocity of the exhaust will be equal to the velocity of the inlet. Put your hand over the outlet on the vac and see if a couple of 3/4" holes is enough not to make back pressure.
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Check this...
https://youtu.be/MaE51LmYYP8

https://youtu.be/MaE51LmYYP8

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On Friday, August 25, 2017 at 11:48:22 AM UTC-4, Casper wrote:

Thanks. I like the baffle system. I'll have to see if I can do something like that. I have to be exact with my height since this is a miter saw cabinet and the saw's table needs to be the same height as the workbench next to it. I don't know if I have room for the double shelf.
Maybe I can do something on the side.
BTW...his electrical skills suck compared to his woodworker skills. No Romex connector where the extension cord goes to the switch box and his switch is upside down. No connector/strain relieve is a dangerous situation.
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On 8/25/2017 10:48 AM, Casper wrote:

There you go. Very interesting design. Derby, my thought with the bottom exhaust was to accomplish this baffling. This is much better.
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On 8/25/2017 6:26 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Build the cabinet, add holes later if there is not enough venting.
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On 8/25/17 4:13 PM, Leon wrote:

Yep! My guess is there will be plenty of gap between the doors and the face frame.
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On Friday, August 25, 2017 at 6:26:59 AM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

y 24" x 24" x 29". The hose

overlay style with a latch.

y won't be air tight, but is

It all depends on where the cabinet is located. If its on an outside wall, vent it like you would a clothes dryer, i.e., run a hose from the "blowing side" through the wall. A small vent to allow for air circulation for coo ling the motor and a bit of sound absorbing material and you are home free.
If its on an inside wall, you are pretty much done for. Because you will h ave to have enough ventilation to cool the motor and enough exhaust capabil ity to keep from seriously cutting into you CFM . You can line the cabinet with sound absorbing material, but all those holes are going to let a lot of noise out.
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On 8/25/2017 7:26 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I built one years ago. I use it attached to my thien separator and then attached to all my equipment. http://imgur.com/a/XuH2l scroll down. It has a baffle and removes the air, and cuts the noise. Homosote is a good choice for insulating the noise. I used a carpet rem.
If I did it again, I would put the baffle on top to get rid of the heat of the vac more easily.
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On Friday, August 25, 2017 at 4:26:59 AM UTC-7, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Don't. Consider, instead, putting the noisy bit outdoors and plumbing the intake through a wall. Or just putting it in an adjacent room. A cabinet will just take up space, make the vacuum into a bulky fixture, and waste building materials, compared to (for instance) wearing earplugs.
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On Saturday, August 26, 2017 at 3:29:49 PM UTC-4, whit3rd wrote:

That's not really an option. Climate, location of the shop in the house, and not to mention that if I were my neighbors/SWMBO I wouldn't want to hear a wet-dry vac turning on and off at random times until late evening.

That's not really an option. Location of the shop in the house, and not to mention that if I were my SWMBO I wouldn't want to hear a wet-dry vac turning on and off at random times until late evening.

The cabinet takes up no room when it is used as the base for the miter saw and *prevents* the vacuum from being a bulky fixture because the vac takes up no floor space.

One $30 sheet of plywood is the only thing I had to buy. A few pocket screws and an old foam mattress topper that I had lying around is all I needed. I actually used up something bulky that's been hanging around in a closet for years.

It's not just me that has to put up with the noise. At close to 70 dB, the bare vac can be heard way beyond the confines of my shop. I'll be posting the results of my sound readings at various points in the projects. Stay tuned.
Not to mention that earplugs inhibit the ability to listen to tunes, etc.
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On Friday, August 25, 2017 at 7:26:59 AM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I completed the cabinet and ran some sound level checks. Before any one jumps all over my testing methods, I'll state right up front that all of my readings are based on the non-verified calibration of my smart phone sound meter app. The app says to find a "silent" spot and set the dB reading to between 10 and 20. The initial reading in a basement bathroom before calibration was 24 db. I set the level to 11 dB and then registered the same reading in a 2nd floor closet. Therefore, all readings below are relative to my "control" reading of 11 dB.
I set the smart phone on a firm stand in my shop and took an ambient reading. In comparison to the 11 dB in the bathroom and closet, I read 16 dB in the quiet shop. There was some outside noise at the time. All vacuum sound level readings were taken at a line-of-sight distance of 8'.
Here are the complete test results:
Test environment:
- 3/4" plywood cabinet, 28" H x 24" W x 21" D - Craftsman 2.0 HP, 8 gallon, wet-dry vacuum - 1" x 23" opening at top rear of cabinet for exhaust - Foam lining is an old mattress topper, flat, not egg crate, 1.5" thick. There is some "egg crate" texture added because of the staple gun. - The readings were taken with the cabinet was fully lined, i.e. all 6 surfaces.
Sound levels:
- Closet/Bathroom: 11 dB - Quiet Shop: 16 dB - Vacuum outside of cabinet: 67 dB - Vacuum inside of cabinet, no foam, door open: 70 dB (more focused sound?) - Vacuum inside of cabinet, no foam, door closed: 58 dB - Vacuum inside of cabinet, foam installed, door open: 65 dB - Vacuum inside of cabinet, foam installed, door closed: 53 dB
As a relative measure, with music playing comfortably, and ranging between 40 and 45 dB, I was still able to hear it (barely) when the vacuum was running and the meter showing 53 dB.
Kitchen table, 1 floor above shop:
- Ambient reading: 15 dB - Vacuum outside of cabinet: 22 dB - Vacuum inside of cabinet, door closed, foam installed: 17 dB
A note on the foam: I had originally put foam on the underside of the top of the cabinet, but that barely left 2" of open space above the vacuum. The foam felt warmer than I liked after about 10 minutes of run time so I removed it. I think that will help with both air flow and heat build-up. Removing the foam from the top did not seem to make much difference in the dB reading but the readings were never rock solid anyway so it's hard to tell. In any case, I'll opt for safety over slightly less sound attenuation.
As long as heat does not become an issue, I'm happy with the results. Worst case, there's room for a small fan inside the cabinet.
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