BLO

I "think" I already know the answer to this question, but thought I would g et confirmation from the group. I am building three serving tables for a l ocal church and the wood given me for the tables was rather freshly cut sou thern yellow pine. The boards that will make the top are dryer than the re st, but I am almost positive not fully dry. Of course, what passes for "fu lly dry" here in So. Ala, would be wringing wet in some places.
Anyway, to the question, "If I put BLO on the top,it is never going to dry, right?" Right now, my game plan is to give the tables to them and tell th em to keep a table cloth (not plastic) on the tables for a year, then finis h them.
Comments please.
Thanks.
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I "think" I already know the answer to this question, but thought I would get confirmation from the group. I am building three serving tables for a local church and the wood given me for the tables was rather freshly cut southern yellow pine. The boards that will make the top are dryer than the rest, but I am almost positive not fully dry. Of course, what passes for "fully dry" here in So. Ala, would be wringing wet in some places.
Anyway, to the question, "If I put BLO on the top,it is never going to dry, right?" Right now, my game plan is to give the tables to them and tell them to keep a table cloth (not plastic) on the tables for a year, then finish them.
Comments please.
Without ever having done it, I would say you could float a layer of BLO on a tub of water and the BLO would still dry. Oil and water aren't miscible.
If the wood is really wet, you cold still put BLO on but it wouldn't do much good, wouldn't soak in. Best advice, try it on a piece and see what it does.
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On 31-Aug-17 5:50 AM, Dr. Deb wrote: ...

If leave unfinished, any table cloth will get stained permanently in all likelihood and the church basement ladies will probably not appreciate that...
If you must use this material, I'd suggest a shellac wash coat at a minimum to block the sap/moisture seepage...
--



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Or tack a thin sheet of tempered hardboard (masonite) on the top untill the moisture content is adequately reduced.
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On Thursday, August 31, 2017 at 3:50:58 AM UTC-7, Dr. Deb wrote:

get confirmation from the group. I am building three serving tables for a local church and the wood given me for the tables was rather freshly cut s outhern yellow pine. The boards that will make the top are dryer than the rest, but I am almost positive not fully dry. Of course, what passes for " fully dry" here in So. Ala, would be wringing wet in some places.

y, right?" Right now, my game plan is to give the tables to them and tell them to keep a table cloth (not plastic) on the tables for a year, then fin ish them.
The knots (any sap, in fact) will gum up with the oil, so you have to shell ac those to seal 'em. After that, BLO will adhere, cure, and after a while (a week in a temperate climate, maybe 3 days in heat) skins over. Wipe down to be sure, but it will be safe against fa bric after it cures.
I use the smell test; when it doesn't smell sour, the BLO has cured. The wood won't dry fast after it's sealed, but it WILL dry and shrink somewhat. Shellac, o r urethane, goes fine over the oil (but I'm not sure about water-based urethane).
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On 8/31/2017 6:50 AM, Dr. Deb wrote:

No matter what they will warp, and shrink. Fresh cut will never work unless it is kiln dried. So unless you figured out how to avoid why we dry wood, it won't matter they will do what they want. A finish like shellac will help the wood dry slowly so it won't loose it so quickly to pretzel.
--
Jeff

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On Thursday, August 31, 2017 at 5:50:58 AM UTC-5, Dr. Deb wrote:

get confirmation from the group. I am building three serving tables for a local church and the wood given me for the tables was rather freshly cut s outhern yellow pine. The boards that will make the top are dryer than the rest, but I am almost positive not fully dry. Of course, what passes for " fully dry" here in So. Ala, would be wringing wet in some places.

y, right?" Right now, my game plan is to give the tables to them and tell them to keep a table cloth (not plastic) on the tables for a year, then fin ish them.

Again, thanks to all. I had not thought of using the shellac wash coat, bu t it makes perfect sense.
As for the cloths getting stained, not a big problem, for a couple of reaso ns. The primary of which is I am going to tell them to use old sheets.
Thanks
Deb
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I agree with applying a shellac coat first. Just don't finish the under s ide of the table and the wood will eventually dry. If you alternate the or ientation of the tables' boards, you likely won't have too much of a proble m with warping.... as hopefully the boards are quarter sawn.
I suggest you try to find a local kiln. Large companies will load the kil n with loads and loads of wood, before firing it up. A few more boards wo n't matter and, for your cause, they might not charge you a fee for the kil n drying. It doesn't hurt to ask them. *Alabama is the center of the Bi ble Belt.... those kiln folks just might cotton to some church donating.
Sonny
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