Which electric tile cutter

My neighbour and I are going halves on an ETC. Both planning to re-tile kitchen and bathrooms and a lot of cutting will be involved.
Local choice at about 34 is Plasplugs Compact Plus or Clarke's ETC6. Max size of tile will be 10" x 8". We're looking for the cleanest cut, rather than fancy gimmicks. Anyone had any experience with these machines.
Work will start in 2 weeks, so no immediate rush, so will consider any other models, which may be available on-line. Thanks.
Bertie
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I have a Screwfix one which works very well. About the only thing I would say is that they are messy to use, as the cooling water tends to fly around a bit, taking tile-dust slurry with it, and slow compared to a scorer. I must admit that for all 'straight' cuts, I just use a bog-standard tabletop 'score 'n' snap' tile cutter. My daughter has just bought one such from B&Q and it was just 15 quid. Very well made and does the job a treat on the 8mm thick tiles she is using. I am only using the electric for very thin cuts where score and snap is impractical, and when just a blade-thickness needs taking off an edge. At a pinch, if you take it slow and are not doing too many like that, you can get away with doing that dry.
It's also useful where you need to take out a 'corner' - around the top of a door frame for instance. Rather than scoring both edges and 'nibbling' the unwanted bit out, you can cut the shortest edge on the electric, and score and snap on the longest. Or cut both.
If you are going to be using an electric a lot, I would also recommend safety goggles as, with the best will in the world, you are not going to be able to make some cuts, with the guard right down, and then little shards of glaze tend to fly ...
Arfa
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Arfa Daily wrote:

IME a saw comes in handy for maybe half a dozen cuts in a whole room and, since these are mostly hidden behind switches and sockets, they don't have to be perfect. I get by with a mini grinder and diamond cutter, though I must say it's the bit I least look forward to.
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That's because you obviously don't have a wet tile cutter. They are slower than score and snap but far more reliable - especially for removing small bits. And well nigh essential for hard tiles like porcelain.
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I've used them, but I put them in the same class as steam wallpaper strippers. Useful for the odd thing but usually not worth the hassle of setting them up. It's not a case of being more reliable. I know in advance what a snapper can do and what it can't. Sometimes I curse not having a saw but obviously I haven't cursed often enough to bother buying one, and lugging it around, and clearing up, and having to go outside to use it etc
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BTW, I used a carbide grit blade in a jigsaw for the first time a couple of weekends. Excellent, much cheaper than a tile cutter & ideal for off jobs.
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Huge wrote:

What make?
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Wickes blade in a B&D jigsaw.
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Presumably cutting pretty soft tiles?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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I imagine so. They're Pilkington "Matrix" black and white ones.
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Try cutting porcelain tiles with one. And they are very expensive if you take their life into consideration.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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You may have a point. I tiled the master bathroom with some tiles that were apparently designed to contain nuclear waste. It took me about an hour to drill 4 holes to put the soap dish up in the shower. I did straight cuts with an angle grinder.

I think they were about 1.50 for three. I've only used one so far.
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stuart noble wrote:

Just on steam wallpaper removers. I bought one to remove paper with the intention of painting the plaster, so it had to be thorough. Saved me *days*.
Rob
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Rob wrote:

Mine's in the loft because, to my knowledge, it's never saved me any time at all. Cold water soaking works just as well IME
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You don't have to use it outside or clear up much in the way of mess - not really any more than from a score and split type.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Tue, 30 Sep 2008 18:35:34 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Agreed. Furthermore there are several other reasons for having a powered cutter.
1) Increasingly tiles may have textures on them which prevent score and snap. 2) You can cut thin strips if that is what is needed. (OK, You should plan not to go there but...)
3) You can cut a 'comb' and knock out all its teeth so as to make a U shaped tile for electrical and other flush mounted accessories.
4) Some tiles are very thick making score and snap a serious challenge.
5) Tiles are on average becoming bigger thus making where complex cuts more frequent.
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I can quite understand a skilled pro tiler preferring score and snap for speed - and time is money - but for ocassional DIY an electric one beats it hands down. I've recently just done a very complex bathroom using 450 x 300 mm porcelain tiles which cost several quid each and not one spoilt. When I used to use score and snap I'd be near in tears at the amount of wastage - and the fact that complex cuts would always break at the last little bit. And it can't just be down to my lack of skill seeing the number of split tiles you see round switches etc in pro jobs.
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I've a feeling your score and snap experience may be based on the old Plasplugs tool where the snap bit was separate from the score bit. Having to reposition the tile and judge by eye where the score was made it an unpredictable affair. The slightly better versions where the arm does both are twice as fast and an absolute doddle to use. Not for porcelain of course but "several quid each" ain't my style :-)
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No - I bought an expensive one from the local decent tool shop. Cast base and roller cutter slide.

I found it fine with 'cheap' tiles - apart of course from removing slivers. And cutting out curves or notches, etc. Once I'd got a power one and discovered it would do everything the snap one wouldn't I've not used it since.

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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

But if you had to cut 50 tiles in half, I guess you might
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