Electric Tile Cutter - recommendations

I'm planning to lay some rivern-edged marble floor tiles this weekend
and was going to hire an electric tile cutter, but having read the
posts on the Plasplugs cutters on this ng, it seems I might be better
off buying one. The hire place want =A324+vat for the weekend and I'm
going to have to hire at least 3 times (I can't do the whole ground
floor in one go).
Plasplugs do cutters at around =A340 and then at =A380 - is the extra
money advisable for marble-type unglazed tiles?
Simon
Reply to
Bitstreams
I'm planning to lay some rivern-edged marble floor tiles this weekend and was going to hire an electric tile cutter, but having read the posts on the Plasplugs cutters on this ng, it seems I might be better off buying one. The hire place want £24+vat for the weekend and I'm going to have to hire at least 3 times (I can't do the whole ground floor in one go).
Plasplugs do cutters at around £40 and then at £80 - is the extra money advisable for marble-type unglazed tiles?
Simon
I personally find Plasplugs gear at the bottom end of the DIY spectrum of usefulness.
I bought a tile cutter from Screwfix for around £60, complete with diamond blade. It has been used for a couple of rooms now, with "meat" still left on the blade. It does fractionally "chatter" the glaze on the face of the tile because the blade is directly mounted on the motor spindle and doesn't run completely true. The result is acceptable and the machine is still available for much more use. Would the Plasplugs one still be alive and kicking?
Reply to
Rambelt
I would say so, yes.
I bought one of the chunkier tile saws in the £100 range some while ago (not a Plasplugs one) following having used one of the entry level Plasplugs ones on some limestone.
The problem with the basic one was that the blade tended to chatter and the base was not as sturdy as it needed to be. The result of that is small chips to the edges of the tiles which you don't really want. The heftier saw has a very solid construction, possibly a better blade and doesn't have these problems.
I would buy a better one and then Ebay it if you don't want to keep it.
Reply to
Andy Hall
IME there is a big difference in the use-ability of the £40 and £80 versions.
With floor tiles you can cut all the tiles and dry fit them with spacers this means that you can reduce the hire time and fit them at your leisure.
Reply to
Ed Sirett
I have a £40 ish Plasplugs & I hate the thing. Fence is all but useless, won't stay clamped & falls apart repeatedly.
Virtually impossible to clean out the water tank. Next decent tiling job I get I'll bin it & buy something better.
Reply to
The Medway Handyman
In article ,
I have one with the plastic clamps and it's ok - provided you wash out the clamps thoroughly after use. If the slurry sets they won't work. Same with the channels they run in. But it's not a brilliant design.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
For floor tiles you want one of the bigger machines. I have one of the entry level Plasplugs ones, which works well for me for wall tiles, and I have not had the chatter, or fence problems that some others have complained of. This probably just indicates that there is a fair degree of variability in the quality control or manufacturing tolerance though, so YMMV. I have used one of the superficially more chunky looking homebase own brand ones, and found it significantly inferior to the plasplugs (table, while metal, was not flat and hence tiles would tend to break tiles when nearing the complete cut).
The plasplugs water recirculation system is a mixed blessing. It makes far less mess than some, but at the same time the water gets progressively dirtier the longer you use it.
For straight cuts the score and snap machines are often faster and simpler than the saws. For complex cuts or difficult tiles though the saws are invaluable.
Reply to
John Rumm
True, but I would class that as a "difficult tile".
I once tiled a bathroom with large travertine marble slabs (about 300mm square). I found the only acceptable way to cut those in the end was outside with a very high quality diamond blade in a small angle grinder against a batten. One of the big saws may have hacked it, but the smaller ones were certainly not up to it.
Reply to
John Rumm
In article ,
I did the steps to the front door with these and found my top of the range Plasplugs - which cost then about 60 quid - fine. I've also cut paving slabs with it. ;-)
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
That's one way to describe it.....
Interesting.
Certainly not for larger format tiles.
Reply to
Andy Hall
I bought a cheap cutter from lord knows where - on sale in the BM - 40 notes - after spending 70 on hiring.
Last year I had to buy new diamond blade for it.
Its cut everything up to and including 20mm marble and 25mm sandstone slabs.
I don't know how I would have managed without one. Probably the best value for money tool ever.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Agreed (but not forgetting SDS drill)!
Cutting round obstacles like sockets and switches is so much easier as is removing narrow strips of tile.
I got the £30 McKellar(sp?) from Focus DIY and a couple of spare discs from Screwfix, of which I've used only one after using 70+ boxes of tiles to renovate toilet, shower room, cloakroom, kitchen, pantry and utility rooms.
Reply to
F
F wrote:
I've manged to avoid ever owning one of those.
And i don;t mss it either.
I DO mis not having and angle grinder ad a bench grinder tho.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
In article ,
You must live in a house with no hard masonry or concrete. Things like some engineering bricks, granite and concrete can't be drilled with a hammer drill.
That's because you've never owned one. ;-) The chiselling feature is very useful too.
I hardly ever use an angle grinder as I'm terrified of them. Bench grinder yes.
(My spell checker took pity on you ;-))
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
just as a follow up, I bought the Plasplugs =A360 tile cutter from B&Q at the weekend and so far it's been excellent (only problem is it does splash a bit) - but otherwise very easy to use and good straight cuts.
Simon
Reply to
Bitstreams
In article ,
I'd say any device with a blade dipped in water will splash. Setting the blade guard carefully helps minimise this. But otherwise just wear clothes that don't mind getting wet and can be chucked straight in the washing machine afterwards.
I prefer to use mine outdoors if possible - it clamps nicely to a workmate by expanding the jaws. And daylight is always better for seeing guide lines etc. Of course a pain if you're tiling a upstairs room. ;-)
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
So does the KcKellar. Cutting tiles in the garage, with the door open, in January/February should be avoided unless you enjoy near freezing water soaking through your outer garments!
Reply to
F

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