When were aerated breeze blocks first used?

I'm trying to date some work on a house (c1920), specifically a dividing wall in the attic space between two semis.
It's been made of quite new-looking aerated blocks - the ones with the zig-zag scribe marks on the side.
<https://www.buildingmaterials.co.uk/images/big/202004001HHCelconSolarAe ratedblock.jpg>
What's the oldest that they could possibly be? To the nearest decade, perhaps.
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On 08/09/18 19:27, Roland Perry wrote:

Think my parents house was buoilt with something like that in the 50s. Coal cinder block. But the later foamy sort are more 1970s IIRC
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

I'd go for 70's too. My place built 1925 used 3" coal cinder blocks on the inner skin and partition walls. They did not realise then how opaque they would be to wifi signals!
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On Saturday, 8 September 2018 20:01:16 UTC+1, Bob Minchin wrote:

but they were thoughtful enough to fit twisted pair wiring.
NT
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On Saturday, 8 September 2018 19:30:48 UTC+1, Roland Perry wrote:

Aerated and breeze blocks are two different things. What are you talking about?
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remarked:

The ones at that url.
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On 09/09/18 10:59, Roland Perry wrote:

I've seen those used in 70s buildings for sure.
Wiki sez this:
The history of foam concrete dates back to the early 1920s and the production of autoclaved aerated concrete, which was used mainly as insulation. A detailed study concerning the composition, physical properties and production of foamed concrete was first carried out in the 1950s and 60s. Following this research, new admixtures were developed in the late 1970s and early 80s, which led to the commercial use of foamed concrete in construction projects. Initially, it was used in the Netherlands for filling voids and for ground stabilisation. Further research carried out in the Netherlands helped bring about the more widespread use of foam concrete as a building material.
So I reckon that what that is is not the 1920s stuff, but the late 70s/80s onwards stuff.
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On 09/09/2018 10:59, Roland Perry wrote:

A bit bleeding obvious IMHO.
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On 08/09/2018 20:27, Roland Perry wrote:

Aerated concrete and ash blocks have been around since the 1950s, a house I lived in built in the 50s had them.
There are other types, which may be later/earlier.
Of course, assuming they are the 1950s type, the work could be much later.
I believe, at one time, it wasn't unknown for there to be no dividing walls in some roof spaces, or for them to be incomplete.
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On 08/09/2018 22:14, Brian Reay wrote:

I have certainly seen them in 50s buildings.
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On Sunday, 9 September 2018 10:12:06 UTC+1, ARW wrote:

ng

Ae

ch later.

There are still loads of terraced houses with no dividing wall in the loft. It's a fire & security issue being addressed very slowly.
NT
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Yes, whole terraces of houses were built with one contiguous attic space. The introduction of dividing walls is more about fire precautions than stopping your neighbours paying a visit I think.
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On 09/09/18 10:57, Roland Perry wrote:

And noise/privacy these days.

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It was a storyline in Coronation St 30+ years ago. Hilda Ogden referred to it as the cockloft, I don't know if that was strictly accurate.
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On 08/09/2018 22:14, Brian Reay wrote:

The true "lightweight" blocks are made from PFA. or pulverated fuel ash as produced by "modern" coal fired stations where coal is "milled" into a very fine powder in large ball or roller mills before being blown into the boilers using something not unlike an oil or gas burner. IIRC it was normally ignited by oil burners. Kingston upon Thames, opened in 1948, must have been one of the last "chain grate" stations in the UK. As the name suggests, "bulk" coal is burned on a moving grate.
I think Croyden B, from about the same period, used Pulverised Fuel.
PFA is collected from the electrostatic precipitators and washed into lagoons where it settles. It would first have been available in large quantities from the 1950's but I think it started being exploited more seriously in the 1960's.
Amazingly, according to Wikipedia, the US trialed PF burning in 1918.
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On 09/09/2018 11:42, newshound wrote:

The dash for gas, solar and wind is going to muck up the building industry at some point then.
Maybe the luddite UK building trades will drag themselves kicking and screaming into the modern era and use SIPP panels with cladding like they do in many other countries.
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Andrew wrote:

About the last five years ...
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Our first house built in the early seventies had breeze blocks for some int ernal walls however a neighbour got hold of some concrete blocks that appea red to be constructed with wood chips mixed in which as soon as they got we t just seem to disintegrate of course the fool built a garden wall then won dered why it fell down. I have never seen anything like them since.
Richard
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On Sunday, 9 September 2018 22:15:40 UTC+1, Tricky Dicky wrote:

nternal walls however a neighbour got hold of some concrete blocks that app eared to be constructed with wood chips mixed in which as soon as they got wet just seem to disintegrate of course the fool built a garden wall then w ondered why it fell down. I have never seen anything like them since.

Presumably if the woodchips are soaked before casting the blocks would then survive wetting.
NT
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On 09/09/2018 22:15, Tricky Dicky wrote:

ISTR there was a sort of insulation block that looked like this: same sort of size as a concrete block and a bit like sterling board but with a very open structure. You were not meant to get them wet!
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