What sort of house?

Finally my husband has said that we have to move house.
Currently we have a two bedroom bungalow in a very rural area . Septic tank, no mains gas and an extension ( one room) which has a flat roof and a large garden - an acre or so, all electric which he also hates.
There is little or nothing going wrong with these things right now. We have had problems with the septic tank in the past ( well a blocked drain but that was sorted - surely you can have blocked drains on mains drainage too?)
He says another place would be cheaper and we cant afford this one. He maintains loads of things are wrong with this house but I don't see any of them when I look around. We have rising damp apparently but its condensation.
I don't know how much our house is worth but not a lot given its state of repair - old bathroom, ( avocado suite if you remember those) and old kitchen and mostly old storage heaters and rather damp right now as a result of no heating. The guttering leaks at all joints and the double glazing is so old it probably needs re doing too.
We don't have a mortgage and no real money worries to be honest.
He wants to move into town into an old peoples unit ( one bed and no garden) which would cost about 80,000. It would be leasehold and maintenance fees are about 500 at the moment.
We would also have to have a water meter and we would still have storage heaters as they have no mains gas allowed there either - I think that was for safety reasons for the elderly.
He is 59 and retired early recently.
I am 50 and still working.
I don't want to move. I would rather try and sort our house out. I don't have the skills for this though. I do know my neighbour who is on a water meter pays 254 a quarter for water and there is no reason to suppose we would use less than her. I currently pay 250 a year in rates for water ( our septic tank means we get reduced rates - we wouldn't get that with a water meter in SW water) .
Is it bad news to have a house with septic tank and storage heaters and no mains gas and a flat roof on an extension? Or is he being bloody silly?
Just want opinions really. Thanks.
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He sees loads of problems that you are not aware of ? Maybe he feels responsible for the maintenance and feels he is letting you down by not being able to do it. Age 59 is very young to want to move into an old peoples development. Do you not enjoy your large garden? Being cooped up in town might be something you soon regret. Having said, that if a house reaches a stage of needing a total renovation, it can be expensive. Why not fix one thing at a time, starting with the leaking gutter ? Happy Christmas ! Simon.
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IMHO, the main thing would be to get some form of affordable heating. Is wood for burning readily available since you live in a rural area?
--
*Why don't you ever see the headline "Psychic Wins Lottery"?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

I don't think that our heating is unaffordable really. It may not be as warm as others but it being on would help
We are currently heating the whole place on one large heater in the hall ( 3.4 kw) and one small heater in the sitting room ( 1.7kw) , There are two heaters in the sitting room but we have the smaller of the two on. To give you an idea the sitting room is 20ft x 13ft. The dining room next to it is 10ft x 12ft . Both bedrooms are 12ft x12ft and neither has a room heater on. The hall heater is supposed to heats them ( its a 3.4 kw ) but the kitchen sucks a lot of heat from the hall. The kitchen is freezing to be honest and wet - water down the windows and water down the tiles on the walls and mould growing on the ceiling across the coor and windows.
He just says we cant afford to put the heating on but I work and get 200 a week and he has 200 a week pension - ok so not as much as we got when he was working .
He just wont let anything be done.
On and there isn't a supply of wood. We would have to open up a fireplace anyway and we don't have a fire grate, and we don't have a boiler and we don't even know what the previous owners did when they blocked the fireplaces up. We could find ourselves knocking out breeze blocks and find nothing in behind at all. I doubt I could afford the money to put a new fireplace in there - and the cost of coal according to my parents is rather more than our electric right now.
Besides he us just hell bent on seeing us freeze with some Victorian idea of going in the poor house ( I am not kidding - he seems to think we are going to be poor because he is now on a pension)
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whiskeyomega wrote:

I think he is looking at the bigger picture here, and you should too. The house is cold and damp, and in the next 8 - 10 years is going to be even damper and probably colder, which at your (and his) time of life isn't going to do either of you any favours healthwise, plus the fact that your 200 per week will probably be a distant memory by then and you'll have to survive on half what you are getting now.
To put the house right, IE central heating, DG, new kitchen, bathroom and pitched roof on extension plus a DPC is going to cost more than you can afford, unless you remortgage the place, wheras if you sell, considering it's in a rural area (another minus point for two pensioners in a cold, damp property), you might get twice what it's going to cost you for a modern unit in town, leaving you a nice nest egg and a comfortable retirement in a warm, safe environment.
OTOH if you really want to stay there, for the sake of the health and wellbeing of both of you, you need to get proper heating(*) and a chemical DPC installed at least. The flat roof will cost you a couple of grand every 25 years or so if you want to leave it on, and I'm sure you could put up with the green bathroom suite for a while.
(*) You can get CH that runs on bottled gas or oil, and it still probably works out cheaper than electricity.
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Phil L
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On Mon, 21 Dec 2009 20:01:17 GMT, Phil L wrote:

Only 'cause he refuses to have the heating on, have a cooker hood vented to the outside etc...

Not a lot in it as far as oil in concerned now, I suspect LPG is similar as well and there would be a significant installation cost. Both gas an oil have maintenance costs, storage heaters generally just work without any maintenance.
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Dave.




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On 21 Dec, 20:01, "Phil L" wrote:

and switch it on!

Average costs of space and water heating for a 2 bed house (Sutherland tables - Scotland, May 2009)
Scottish Power White Meter storage heaters, electric rads, immersion 1102 LPG condensing boiler 1279 Oil condensing boiler 752
This assumes LPG is 46.87p/l and oil is 41.22p/l
Owain
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Owain wrote:

After reading the entire thread, it seems to me that mr whiskeyomega appears to have given up on life to some degree and is now ready to climb into a coffin and wait. There is no reason at all why they couldn't budget for a bank loan of a few thousand pounds to have CH installed, then when that's paid off, get another loan for a DPC - within a few years the place could be like a palace, but he sounds like he's depressed and it all seems too much for him and he wants to hide away from it rather than confront it, hence the 'package' of the OAP unit. I think some, if not all of his depression comes from his percieved inability to earn a wage, but there's plenty of opportunities if he looks around, but he sounds like he's assigned himself to the scrapheap, making it all impossible, which has a knock-on effect of stopping him spending any money (no heat, house falling to rack & ruin etc) - if they've got no mortgage and 1600 a month coming in between 2 of them, they should be living like royalty, and I doubt if they'd need a loan to do anything - there must be quite a few grand lying around doing nothing already
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Eek! If you do end up going down the divorce route (hope not, it's not very nice) through voluntary separation then you've got to wait two years from separating. However that doesn't mean you need to live in different houses. So long as you live separate live (eating, sleeping socialising) then that counts.
Mind you, it sounds like you wouldn't have trouble building a case for unreasonable behaviour either but it'll probably cost more in solictors fees.
Matt
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On Tue, 22 Dec 2009 06:56:02 -0800 (PST), matthelliwell

Which bring us back to DIY ! ;-)
Andy C
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wibbled on Tuesday 22 December 2009 21:12

That's the first step - like being an alchy - know the problem exists.
The OP's husband sounds a bit like my Dad - although my Dad could pull some pretty amazing things off if he could be arsed to start.
To an extent I suffer a little of that. I find it very hard to start a job and get pissed off big time if something goes wrong. But I acknowledge that and try, if expecting to do something the next day, to set up all the "boring" bits the day before. Like clear stuff out of the way, confirm I have the right tools handy and the correct materials - that sort of thing.
I'm totally jealous of people who can plough through jobs with massive optimism - I'm not one of them. But if I can will myself to get started, I can do perfectly adequate, and sometimes excellent work.
--
Tim Watts

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I love this house. It me going out to work that paid for it. I paid the mortgage off in six years ( our mortgage was supposed to run until he was 65) . He input the money from our last hell hole ( an ex council house, which wass damp and cold and had belonged to his father - he inherited it. After he rowed the neighbour over a bloody leylandii bush we had to move)
This house was warm and dry and had few problems when we moved here - 12 years ago.
I used to keep it up whilst he was at work - get workmen in to do things or my mother and father to help me decorate.
Then the bastard retired last summer. Since then he has been on a savings trip.
I told him this morning I would buy him out of the house and he could F Off to his precious old peoples bungalow. I wouldnt be able to live there anyway, I am under 55 and thats the minimum age you both have to be. I told him I was not going to live in the cold any longer. I have switched all the heating on to come on this evening.
The kitchen is still a problem though. Its got condensation ( even he admits it).
I also now have a decorating and maintenance problem I would not have had otherwise. That will now cost of course.
But I still like this house. Its what most of you on this board would give your right arms for to be honest. I did too.
All it needs is a bit of care instead of an arse who is intent on being obsessed with money and mains gas. He still keeps saying that because we dont have gas we cant be warm.
Oh, and he now says he didnt stop me putting the heating on if I wanted to pay the collosal bill at the end of it.
I just told him to bugger off out of it. He hasnt. I have just had enough. I dont see why I need to move to a box in a town for nothing. Now I need some cheap fixes until spring - for guttering, for the damp and the decoration . I saw the suggestion for wall paper earlier.
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Good on you.
mark
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On Tue, 22 Dec 2009 10:37:47 +0000, wrote:

=============================================== You don't really need to do any of the jobs right now. Just buy a few electric heaters and plug them in. Fan heaters are good for this purpose as they give instant localised heat which will shift most of the obvious damp. Repair the jammed open kitchen window and keep it closed except when cooking. You can work out the potential cost of electricity if necessary but it's really time to say forget the cost and live a bit better.
When you're feeling a bit warmer draw up a list of jobs to be done and post it here for advice on priorities and how to do them.
Go out today and buy a decent-sized dog kennel and lock your miserable old dog in it - it will give him a taste of the kind of living he's trying to impose on you.
Cic.
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were saying:

Good for you, girl.

Soddit. Get the heating on now. Once the place is warmed through, it won't take as much energy to keep it warm as it takes to get it there.
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Bending the laws of physics I see.
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On Wed, 23 Dec 2009 22:43:16 -0000, dennis@home wrote:

it
there.
Wrong. In the warming up phase the fabric of the building will require energy to heat it up. Once in a steady state the energy required to maintain that state will be less as the fabric is no longer absorbing heat to raise it's temperature.
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Cheers
Dave.




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Its Dennis the dim - what do you expect ?
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geoff

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wrote:

Its easy to prove that you are the one that's wrong. Energy loss is higher with higher temp differences. The steady state has a higher temp difference so it *must* lose more energy, QED.
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Rubbish, you eejit
The heat loss of a well insulated house at temperature is much less than the energy required to raise the temperature of the fabric of the building. There is still a delta T loss which is increasing as the building comes up to temperature
Go on then - do the calculation and present it here, since it is, as you say, easy to prove
--
geoff

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