What's available to remotely switch a power circuit?

We want a set of sockets (powering mostly low power things like lamps, PCs, phone chargers, etc.) which can be turned on/off remotely by somrthing like a switch by the door. Thus one would be able to leave the room and 'turn off' using a swithch at the door.
It doesn't need to be long range, just across a room and I'd really prefer something mains powered rather than battery powered. We don't want to have to select what to turn off either, it just needs an on/off switch (with specific on and off positions, need to know it's off) to turn off all of the sockets on the particular circuit.
The Quinetic 16A remote is the best I can find so far but it's not quite guaranteed to maintain it's on/off positions. Is there not some sort of remote control switch that would look and feel like a normal light switch, always 'up for off/down for on' (in the UK)?
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Chris Green
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On 15/05/2019 12:24, Chris Green wrote:

A switched spur exactly meets your needs, but you'd need to do quite a lot of new wiring to install it.
I'm quite surprised to hear that Qinetic switches don't work 100%.
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On Wed, 15 May 2019 12:42:50 +0100, GB wrote:

Conversely I am totally unsurprised. I wouldn't trust *any* consumer- grade wireless equipment. WiFi, bluetooth, proprietary zappers. None has been 100% reliable. I can see where the money goes on military kit, if they have to be 100% reliable.
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Yes the abort switch on launching a missile that failed could be very expensive! Brian
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On 15/05/2019 13:47, Jethro_uk wrote:

IME military kit is not necessarily any more reliable. All you can usually hope for is it will work at a wider temperature range, and be designed to let you hose the remains of the previous operator off it with no ill effects!
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and they are allowed to use leaded solder!
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from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
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On Wednesday, 15 May 2019 17:33:42 UTC+1, John Rumm wrote:

Neither of those have any truth IME. And yes I did work with such kit.
NT
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On 15/05/2019 17:59, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

So your experience is limited, who knew?
Perhaps I need a "tongue in cheek" flag?
(and the "hose off" bit on some projects is a rather grim and sad reality - I recall one installation of several mil spec workstations in the back of a 4 tonne army truck that would be expected to operate not far behind a front line ans so was considered vulnerable to chemical and biological attack. It was designed such that you could open the drain gates, and apply a high pressure hose to the top of it. All the kit had to be IP68 or better)
As to reliable, much depends on your definition of reliable. Yup its physically robust, and built with high reliability components, but it general is only slightly less likely (if at all) to have bugs than commercial kit.
The software for it is developed, designed and documented to far higher standards than commercial kit. And its well tested, and usually far more maintainable. However it also suffers from a much smaller user base in many cases, and often relies on tool chains that have a vastly smaller user bases than more traditional desktop development tools. So it can take longer to find and fix issues than in the commercial world.
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On Thursday, 16 May 2019 14:43:47 UTC+1, John Rumm wrote:

if by limited you mean years in the industry then yes

Sadly it can be. However I don't believe any of the equipment I worked on or with or even just saw was hoseable.

but a lot is not

It's certainly better than domestic retaill stuff, no doubt. But still long term reliability varies a lot. Engineering for reliability is not as easy as it looks.
NT
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Military kits is allowed to use leaded solder ;-)
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from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
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On Friday, 2 August 2019 19:50:14 UTC+1, charles wrote:

I reckon one of the most important differences is vibration-proofing
NT
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On 02/08/2019 19:49, charles wrote:

Actually mandated rather than just allowed in some cases...
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On 15/05/2019 17:33, John Rumm wrote:

I'm surprised no-one has mentioned the small round pin 5 amp sockets that MK still sell (and still legal I believe) that are wired as a radial circuit through a light switch. This allows all your standard lamps, side lamps etc to be switch off with one switch.
Don't some European countries have this installed as standard ?.
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Of course one could use a relay on the lighting circuit as unless you want to be in the dark if the switch is already there, using a relay should be fine. Brian
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By 'remote' I meant no wiring between switch and controlled circuit. Yes, obviously I could simply wire things to do what we want.

They do in the main, however they are just 'toggles', click the switch and the remote circuit will change state, there's no guarantee of 'up = off'.
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On 15/05/2019 12:24, Chris Green wrote:

If you have wi-fi available then you could choose from a whole range of smart plugs and control them via mobile app from anywhere, with feedback. Argos have the tp-link ones for £20 at the moment, and I have a couple for controlling things various and can vouch for quality.
https://www.argos.co.uk/product/6254269
Andy
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Way, way too complicated. We don't walk around with our mobiles here because there's no coverage anyway, but compareed with 'push this switch to turn off' any sort of mobile app is a dead loss.
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On 15/05/2019 12:24, Chris Green wrote:

The Quinetic Remote Socket Adaptor with a 4/6 way plug board really is your best bet . By "guaranteed to maintain on/off position" do you mean 0% chance of it being switched by external interference ? If so I dont think any remote switch is. If you mean the ON and OFF positions of the switch occasionally reverse, then I have had this happen with a 2 gang light switch very occasionally. Its usually easy to remedy - put the switch in the required OFF position, remove power to the remote adaptor or circuit being controlled , switch power back on. Another way is to remove the switch out of range and set to correct position.
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On 15/05/19 14:19, Robert wrote:

+1. BTDT
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Exactly my problem with the Quinetic switches. If there's no obvious way to tell if you've turned everything off then there's a (small) risk that you may have turned everything on! I know it's easy to reset them but you have to know which way they're working before you know they need resetting.
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