WC tank filler mechanism: Fluidmaster Pro Bottom Entry Fill Valve

I've just seen one of these Fluidmasters in action, and was impressed.
How tricky is it for a handyman non-professional to replace a conventional floating-ball filler valve with one of these?
Is it as simple as unscrew old, screw on new?!
--
/\/\aurice
(Retired in Surrey, UK)
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On 10/02/2012 16:50, Maurice Batey wrote:

Depends if the old one side entry or bottom entry?
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 17:51:07 +0000, The Medway Handyman wrote:

Assuming bottom entry; that's what that model is for.
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On 10/02/2012 20:01, Maurice Batey wrote:

Sorry, there was a clue in the title I overlooked :-)
OK, water off, flush & drain cistern.
Undo the tap connector which joins the supply pipe to the plastic thread on the valve.
If possible/easy, cut away a section of pipe & use a flexible tap connector; http://www.screwfix.com/p/flexible-tap-connector-15mm-x-x-300mm/13143
If not, renew the fibre washer in the old tap connector.
Undo the plastic nut holding the fill valve & remove. Clean out any shite in the bottom of the tank.
Insert new valve, rubber washer inside, cone down & fit plastic nut, but don't do up tight just yet. Make sure no moving parts catch on the cistern sides.
Screw the tap connector onto the plastic thread - make absolutely sure it doesn't cross thread - thats why you haven't done the plastic nut up fully, it gives a bit of play to make sure things are straight.
Now do up the plastic nut & tap connector hand tight, then nip them up with half a turn with a spanner.
Turn on water, check for leaks, adjust water level.
Robert is your fathers brother.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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I would add here... Unclip the valve (with the diaphram) from the top, hold a mug over the outlet to direct the fountain back into the cistern, and turn on the water for 5-10 seconds. This will flush out any debris in the pipe, which will otherwise be washed into the valve the first time you use it, preventing it shutting off, because the higher flow rate is likely to dislodge debris which has been settled in the pipe for years.
--
Andrew Gabriel
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On Sat, 11 Feb 2012 13:57:19 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Do you mean the *old* valve, before it's removed?
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I meant the new one.
You could do it with the old one instead if you can remove its guts so it lets a full flow through. The object is to flush any debris out of the supply pipework, so it doesn't get stuck in the Fluidmaster's diaphram.
--
Andrew Gabriel
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Thank you muchly, sir! Just one thing puzzles me:
On Sat, 11 Feb 2012 11:42:27 +0000, The Medway Handyman wrote:

When you say 'cut away a section of pipe', I assume you mean the supply pipe that enters the tank, so that the connection of the Fluidmaster can be close to the bottom of the tank. But the new gadget needs to be solidly connected to the input pipe, not on a flexible mount, surely?
(I had assumed the web site was going to show an adaptor for fitting on the end of the shortened input pipe to provide a threaded connection to the gadget.)
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On 11/02/2012 17:14, Maurice Batey wrote:

No. At present I assume the fill valve is connected via rigid copper pipe? The connection is outside the tank.
You can just reconnect the new fill valve to that, once it id in place.
However, its much easier to use a flexible connector, in which case you would need to cut a piece of the copper pipe away.
--
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On Sat, 11 Feb 2012 18:06:15 +0000, The Medway Handyman wrote:

Under the tank is a short copper pipe projecting through the bottom of the tank. (When I say short, I mean there is only a gap of around 2" between tank and bulkhead. Can 't get hand in...)

Inside the tank presumably, but the problem there is that the pipe coming through from underneath projects some unches into the tank, whereas I believe the Fluidmaster needs to be fitted at the bottom of the tank. So the problem that would arise for me is how to shorten that entry pipe and provide a thread for the Fluidmaster to screw onto.

That's the bit I don't undertstand. Surely the Fluidmaster can't be mounted on the end of a flexible pipe? Did you mean perhaps a flexible pipe from the outside, terminating just inside the tank?
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On 12/02/2012 13:55, Maurice Batey wrote:

I think we need a photo.....
None of this makes sense.
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On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 14:08:19 +0000, The Medway Handyman wrote:

OK - here they are:
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/10969499/inside-tank-1.JPG
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/10969499/inside-tank-2.JPG
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/10969499/under-tank.JPG
All 3 are of the potential to-be-converted WC tank.
N.B. My earlier reference to 'little room under tank' refers to the WC tank that has already been converted. The above tank has more room underneath, as can be seen.
--
/\/\aurice
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Maurice Batey wrote:

That looks pretty standard. So, you need to turn off the water (I don't see an isolating valve, so you may have to turn off the mains supply) and empty the cistern. Unscrew the tap connector (the nut that screws the copper pipe to the plastic base of the valve) and the pipe will be disconnected. Undo the plastic nut that holds the valve to the cistern base, and the old valve should lift out. Drop the new one in its place and do up the plastic nut. At this point I would try pouring some water into the cistern to make sure it's watertight before going any further.
Then you need to conenct the water. You have three options: 1) Use the tap connector that's already there - but you should really replace the washer. This will work if the new valve is the same length as the old one, but if not then the connector may not reach.
2) Alter the pipework to make the connector reach. A lot of effort compared to option 3.
3) Use a flexible connector. You need to cut the water pipe to the left of the elbow, at a point where the flexible connector will reach the valve in a smooth curve without any kinks. Clean the paint off and attach the flexible connector to the pipe (with a compression joint), then screw the other end onto the valve. You may want to add an isolating valve if there isn't one already. You can get flexible tap connectors with screwdriver-operated valves built in, but these tend to stop working after a while - I would use a separate lever valve.
Mike
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On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 12:05:01 -0600, Mike Humphrey wrote:

That's what's puzzling me. I had assumed tnat when the new valve has been fixed in place, it is at that point connected to the water supply that had been feeding the old valve!
Looks as though I shall have to leave this for the plumber...
--
/\/\aurice
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Maurice Batey wrote:

The valve isn't usually "mounted" on any pipe, but supported by the cistern. There is a hole in the bottom of the cistern (once the old valve is removed). The new valve drops into this hole, then a nut goes onto the bottom end and tightens against the base of the cistern. The valve is now fixed in place, and the cistern watertight, but no water supply is connected. Then a tap connector goes onto the bottom of the valve. If the old valve had a tap connector on the end of rigid pipe, it will only fit if the new valve is exactly the same length. If not, the easiest way to deal with it is to cut off the tap connector and a bit of the supply pipe, then attach a flexible tap connector.
Mike
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On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 11:43:33 -0600, Mike Humphrey wrote:

But if the new valve is now fixed in place at the bottom of the tank (at the point where the mains feed comes in) , how does one then put a connector onto the bottom of it?
I think I'm going to have to buy another valve so I can get take a good look at the mechanism's layout...
--
/\/\aurice
(Replace "nomail.afraid" by "bcs" to reply by email)
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On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 16:50:55 +0000, I wrote:

See e.g.:
http://tinyurl.com/6t3t6w3
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Typical Harry response
I've had one in for a year along with their flush mechanism and it is excellent. The syphon system failed on mine and I needed a new one - went for the Fluidmaster flush system which is so stupidly simple that I don't know why we persist in this country with the syphon type mechanism. The operation is incredibly light and allows a long or short flush depending on how long you hold the handle down.
I also fitted the valve mechanism. The only problem I faced was that the cistern is a narrow one and I had to juggle things a little to get the float to come up properly and not foul the lever mechanism.
Go for it.
Rob
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Maurice Batey wrote:

Any reason why you're inflicting a Japanese character set on everyone?
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On Sat, 11 Feb 2012 11:53:52 +0000, Andy Burns wrote:

You mean UTF-8, used by a large part of the Linux community?
Ironically, I had recently changed to UTF-8 after someone else (in the gmane Thunderbird newsgroup) said his newsreader had a problem with the ISO-08859-1 I was using, and subsequently agreed that the change to UTF-8 was better for him!
--
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