Waterproof roofing for shed?

My 12' x 10' garden shed/workshop is leaking - for the umpteenth time. Several times over the last month I've plastered black sticky stuff over the seam where it occurs. But somehow water is still getting in. This is the second felt roof I've had in 12 years and prompts my first question.
Q1. Why aren't shed roofs simply covered with some robust plastic sheeting, cut to size and nailed or glued after tucking around the edges?
I'm not a confident DIYer so want to get someone to fix it. But so far all the companies I've been looking up online seem to describe 'felt' in the context of sheds and flat roofs.
Q2. How/where can I find someone or some company to quickly cover the existing old felt roof (slightly sloping) with a permanent, reliable waterproof sheet of some sort, whether plastic, rubber or whatever?
Q3. Are there any downsides to such an approach please.
I need to get something done urgently, as the shed is used for my electronics hobby. Latest project damaged overnight.
Any practical advice would be much appreciated please.
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Terry, East Grinstead, UK

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Terry Pinnell wrote:

or
<http://www.scottsheds.com/shop/composites/apex-garden-shed-coroline-roofing-system
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Yes someone I used to know swore that Butyl or however its spelled was the answer to this. Its often used in ponds, apparently.
I have a little shed that probably could do with a new roof. In the old days they used to use corrugated asbestos of course.... Brian
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Because metal decking works a hell of a lot better and lasts a hell of a lot longer.

Yep, doesn't last anything like as long as metal decking.

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Thanks both, appreciate the fast replies.
Rod,

I did say 'or whatever'! Metal sounds good. Presumably expensive? Much noisier than felt in rain?
Wouldn't rubber also be very long-lasting?
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Not really, and the shed roof isn't that big.

Yeah, quite a bit in very heavy rain.

Doesn't last anything like as long as galvanised steel.
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On 30/10/2015 09:28, Rod Speed wrote:

Others will know better but you may get condensation problems with plastic / metal. I have a 7 foot roof extension from my shed of corrugated plastic, open on two sides and some days it is like a shower underneath with all the drips.
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Doesn't happen if you insulate it properly. My entire house has a metal decking flat roof.
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On Friday, October 30, 2015 at 10:37:03 AM UTC, Rod Speed wrote:

Rod, from the bits you have posted your house sounds interesting. Do you have a web site or any information / photos etc that we can peruse ?
Simon.
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Fraid not. It was done in the days before the net had even been invented and I was stupid enough to not take any photos during the construction too.
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On 30/10/2015 08:37, Terry Pinnell wrote:

This stuff is cheap and durable (you can get some that is only 0.5 mm thick).
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Metal-Roofing-Cladding-sheets-Black-0-7mm-Plastic-coated-/111797241119?hash=item1a07a2851f:g:ussAAOxyVLNSxnR8
If it is a sloping (not a pitched) roof you could probably simply glue sheets straight on the felt with mastic. If you use the proper roofing screws or nails you should not get leaks.
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On Friday, 30 October 2015 08:37:49 UTC, Terry Pinnell wrote:

The stuff is known as box profile metal sheet in the UK. Usually galv & then plastic coated. (Many colours). Comes on the roll and is cut to length as specified. If you can find a local supplier, they might have off-cuts.
http://www.cladco.co.uk/products/box-profile-341000-sheets-roofing-and-cladding
Fixings BTW go in the valley not on the crest. Various grades and lifetimes.
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We just order it in the lengths you need.

Not with the best metal decking. Its got clips that you attach to the perlins and the decking goes onto those so there are no fasteners thru the decking at all. Some like mine you crimp after its been put onto the clips.

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On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 07:31:30 +0000, Terry Pinnell

Wrong time of the year unfortunately as it must be applied in the dry but fibreglass would solve the problem very well. Butyl rubber (as used in pond liners) is an alternative that isn't as good but will last much longer than felt and doesn't need warm dry days to apply it.
Another alternative is clear Polycarbonate sheet. This is normally used to replace the roof (and give lots more light) but can also be laid on top of the existing roof.

Many roofers only understand hot melt/felt especially for sheds and although the techniques for all are fairly simple they often get it wrong. Find a local roofer familiar with the material you want to use - for fibreglass and Butyl Rubber suppliers may be able to help with contact details for roofers who use their products.
Experience in Polycarbonate sheet is more usually found in local double glazing/conservatory companies but you might want to consider it (replacing the whole roof which is quite easy) as it transforms the amount of light inside.
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But might not survive in full sunlight or with the odd tree bits falling on it.

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Must say I'm attracted by the potential for replacing my many mains lights by daylight. But presumably I could no longer stand on it as I can at present, to cut back the adjoining laurel?
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On Fri, 30 Oct 2015 13:44:28 +0000, Terry Pinnell

You could always put a plank walkway on it if you used triwall. That would be quite adequate to spread your weight and walk on to trim the shrub and would cost you too much light.
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On 30/10/2015 07:31, Terry Pinnell wrote:

The brown corrugated roofing panels may be what you need. They can often be fixed over the top of everything. Several brand names, I think 'Onduline' is one, but bituminous fibrous shed panels. wickes have them.
Tim W
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Thanks Tim, that looks promising. Just watched this video by Peter Parfitt:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUn9oIHt8Lc

Surprised that none of the roofers I've spoken to ever mentioned it. Maybe half a dozen five years or so ago, and four this morning, with more calls yet to make.
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Wickes sheeting is Onduline, IIRC from reading their website recently.

As someone else said, they often just seem to think about torch on felt cos that's what they know.
I would consider the noise though if you will be in there in the rain. I don't know how Onduline is as it's quite a bit thixker than plastic sheeting, but corrugated plastic, or the double/triple wall stuff is really noisy in the rain
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