washing machine bearings

I'm about to attempt to replace the drum bearings in my ancient Hotpoint
microtronic 18873 washing machine as they are becoming deafaning.
I've so far removed the back, and the nut holding the pulley onto the drum
shaft. I'm now wondering how the pulley comes off, is it screwed on, or is it
a push fit onto the shaft. The last one I did (AEG) was keyed on, but I
suspect this one is screwed. Can anyone confirm, or point me to a source of
info on replacing drum bearings.
Reply to
<me9
Get a copy of the Haynes manual. Remember, of course, the optimistic language in which these are written! But the drom bearing example *is* a Hotpoint. Library may have it.
I have a Hotpoint (earlier model) which was the original reason I first came to uk.d-i-y! On mine, the pulley does unscrew, as I recall. Drum shaft can then be tapped forward and out comes the drum.
Bearings on mine were a pain to get out, and the advice I got here was 'hit them harder'. Large cold chisel and club hammer. Yours may have a different arrangement.
Best to change the spider and the bearings while they are out. The pair are obtainable cheaply online - last time I looked they were less than 20 quid from CPC (and 70 quid from Hotpoint dealer). And that's a genuine part, not a pattern.
Reply to
Bob Eager
On 3 Oct,
That sounds useful, thanks. How early was early? Mine's coming up for 22 years. Is it likely to be the same?
Reply to
<me9
Mine is almost exactly 13 years old. In that time, just:
* new bearings * door seal * 2 sets of motor brushes * new heater element (actually it was the element seal, but had to replace heater)
We're in a hard water area and don't bother about Calgon...no need!
Reply to
Bob Eager
On 3 Oct,
Mine did screw off. the next problem is getting the shaft out without damaging the thread!
We've had ours 22 years of heavy use, but partly as a spare machine we've had several sets of brushes, at least one door seal, perhaps two, A motor (under warranty) (with welded on pulley so I can no longer change the front bearing! and a water valve. The concrete block disintegrated several years ago and was replaced with a scrap lead weight. Overall, quite reliable, and spares still available.
Now to get this drum out.... I may be gone a while...
Reply to
<me9
would suggest sticking with original mfr bearings, cheaper ones can fail to last well.
Never seen anyone suggest replacing good spiders before, and cant see any reason to.
NT
Reply to
meow2222
I agree. I was talking about original manufacturer bearings too.
Think that was in the manual. At under 20 quid for the pair, seemed worth it if it has a chance of prolonging the life of the new bearings. I believe the spider shaft is not a tight fit in the bearing, so there can be movement and it will wear; it actually has a phosphor bronze insert which needs to be soaked in oil before assembling.
Reply to
Bob Eager
On 3 Oct,
I usually get the same spec bearings from a local supplier. As long as they are te same spec no problem, but I'll prolly go for a kit complete with seal (no response from google for it's type number.
The spider looks redeemable. I'll clean it up tomorrow and see. The problem will be removing the bearings, particularly the inner one. I've just used my last remaining Plus Gas on the bearings. I'll see if I can remove them tomorrow.
Can you still get Plus Gas? Or is there a better replacement?
Reply to
<me9
On 3 Oct,
I've recently thrown out a more recent (17YO) AEG, as beyond repair, and replaced it with a Miele. I hope it lasts at least as long as the AEG, but preferably as long as the Hotpoint.
The Miele was (this year half way between the new price of the AEG (17yo) and the Hotpoint (22yo), so effectively cheaper than either with inflation.
Reply to
<me9
In article , "Bob Eager" writes:
I had to change the two together on one occation when the bearing was rusted onto the shaft. The shaft and internal spider assembly was available with or without the bearing, but same price either way. I was also surprised how cheap it was for a ~20 year old Hotpoint.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
On 4 Oct,
Progress report, bearings removed easily with club hammer and drift, Housing in reasonable nick, Spider servicable, and bearings/seals on order. I suppose there could be a wait with the postal problems.
I'll try a heat gun on the housing and bearings in the freezer for re-fitting, it usually works.
Reply to
<me9
I made a shaped wooden drift to make it easier to get the bearings back in. I also measured the depth of the housing, and the bearing, to help me verify that it had gone all the way home.
Reply to
Bob Eager
In message , snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net writes
The bearings are easy to come by
Not so easy (in my experience) is getting the seals (which is normally why the bearings went in the first place), unless buying a complete kit
Reply to
geoff
On 6 Oct,
I can get the bearings easily enough at my usual bearing supplier.
He would be able to supply seals, but possibly not in this case as the shaft is bushed, and may not be a standard size.
I've ordered a kit on line to get the full set, also one or two other bits and bobs, the only problem is the postal strike.......
Reply to
<me9

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