victorian downpipe joints

Should the top part of a cast iron down pipe sit loosely within the lower part of the pipe? The lower part of the pipe has been raised above the drain but should flow down into the drain: should we fit a "shoe"?
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On 11/09/2018 16:14, Oneofthetwo wrote:

You mean where one section of cat iron pipe ends and joins to the next?
The joints need to be sealed. This was traditionally done by winding cord around the male end of the pipe before inserting into the socket to create a seal around the bottom of the socket, then mortar or mastic used to fill the socket (the cord providing enough seal to stop the mortar falling into the pipe and going down the drain)

Depends on how well shaped the gully is, and whether water will splash back against the wall making it damp.
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Cheers,

John.
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On Tuesday, 11 September 2018 16:14:09 UTC+1, Oneofthetwo wrote:

Cast iron down pipe should be installed from the top down. This to ensure there is a clearance to allow for expansion. The joints were sealed with a tarred rope called Gaskin. Dunno if it's still available. You could use some modern flexible sealant I suppose.
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On 13/09/18 06:56, harry wrote:

I thought many were done by hammering in lead slivers?
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