Using wiring for attic light socket as plug socket?



Of course the opposite is also easy....
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Chris French


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On Thu, 13 Feb 2014 15:02:32 +0000, chris French

If you mean fitting a larger fuse carrier in place of the smaller fuse carrier (e.g. fitting a 15A fuse carrier into a 5A fuse bridge) it's actually impossible without the assistance of a "Birmingham Screwdriver".
Perhaps I'm a little out of the ordinary in keeping a set of correctly wired fuse carriers spare to facilitate fuse replacement. Perhaps I'm also a little unusual in only re-wiring a blown fuse with the correct fusewire.
The practice of miswiring fuses with the wrong fuse wire seems to be one only followed by those aiming to earn a "Darwin Award". The fuse carriers are clearly marked with their fuse rating amperage and the fusewire card clearly identifies each wrap of fusewire and it's not exactly 'Rocket Science' to figure how to rewire a Wylex fuse carrier.
The fact that Niglon cards of replacement fusewire were readily available from almost any hardware store or chandlers does suggest that this was a job that was deemed to be within the competence of the typical literate householder of the day.
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Regards, J B Good

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Theres people I know who'd have to get a man in to "change a damm light bulb";!...
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Tony Sayer



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A friend had a local handyman in to hang her Christmas lights since her husband was still recovering from a hip operation.
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what's wrong with a 6" nail?
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Back in the good old days a brass volume control shaft was a good replacement for any value of fuse in a 13A plug. Never seen one blow.

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Bill

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knew them well.
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paulfoel wrote:

to run this wire into a double plug socket. (Then I can put plug on end of wiring for light also and just plug this is leaving me with one space socket).

Feed the supply to a 5A fused spur unit and feed that to the 13A socket, and label the socket 'Max load 5A'. That's what they usually do for aerial amps. You do need to pick up an earth from the lighting circuit though, so if there isn't one you're stuffed.
Years ago I went to a block of flats to find out why the TV system didn't work very well. There was no amp in loft above the communal stairs, but I could see coaxes passing across that loft into the loft of a flat, so I got into there and found the amp, which was strategically placed midway between a lighting terminal box and a steel housing which was something to do with the warden call system. The mains cable for the amp had been stripped back by about two feet. The brown wire went to the lighting terminal box and the blue one went to one of the screws that held the lid on the metal box. This was not the cause of the fault, which was simply that the amp was overloaded by aerial signal. However I made myself unpopular by disconnecting the amp (which left the residents with no reception rather than poor reception) pending the arrival the next day of an electrician.
Bill
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wrote:

Assuming we're dealing with 'modern' lighting circuits which are required to include a protective earth, if you're going to use a FIVE AMP fuse inline, you might as well forego the luxury of such a fuse box connection altogether for your 13A socket spur and just use an ordinary joint box to tap into the lighting circuit.
The 6A fuse or CB at the CU will still provide the same level of fault protection on the lighting circuit and exceed safety requirements for the attached 13A Socket circuit. With a 5A fuse you're just as likely to see the 6A fuse blow (or CB trip) at the CU as you are the 5A cartridge fuse in the spur fuse box.
The extra fuse protection only makes sense with 3A or lower rated fuses fitted. You can always fit a 13A[1] fuse on a temporary basis to allow you to use a powertool or whatever that draws just less than the 6A limit on the lighting circuit with all bar the one lamp switched off whenever you want to avoid the hassle of digging out and setting up a mains extension cord from a regular mains socket.
[1] If you're going to swap out the regular 1, 2 or 3 amp fuse, you might as well fit a 13A fuse and work to the 6A limit of the lighting circuit protection.
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Regards, J B Good

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