TV over ethernet

At the moment I have no TV aerial or cable TV - manage quite happily without until now.
Is it possible to take a Freeview aerial feed, say, and connect it to a home network (CAT6/NAS/8 port switch), and have the TV signal at each ethernet point throughout the house?
--
Cheers, Rob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Free to air TV over Internet, CatchupTV , on web and as an app, seems to use about a gig an hour on 3g.
Virgin sim only unlimited data is very handy :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday 06 February 2014 11:22 RJH wrote in uk.d-i-y:

No, not directly.
Indirectly you could use MythTV - one server with TV cards connected to the aerial. The viewing ends - a MythTV client plugged into the net.
Or just subscribe to various Internet delivery systems and/or use iPlayer.
--
Tim Watts Personal Blog: http://squiddy.blog.dionic.net/

http://www.sensorly.com/ Crowd mapping of 2G/3G/4G mobile signal
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, February 6, 2014 11:22:52 AM UTC, RJH wrote:

I think the closest you would get to that is a MythTV Linux box running a backend at the aerial location and a MythTV Linux box running a frontend at each TV. A very nice solution albeit complicated to set up and expensive!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MythTV
Probably easier to put tv points where you need them
Philip
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 06 Feb 2014 11:22:52 +0000, RJH wrote:

Yes, but it doesn't look very cheap... http://www.klicktv.co.uk/tv-and-video-distribution-solutions/tv-over-cat5/ index.html (and probably others - that was the first likely result from googling "tv aerial over ethernet")
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 06/02/14 11:22, RJH wrote:

It's not that simple. You can connect a device that takes a RF TV feed (Freeview or Freesat) and digitises the signal and then distributes the digital signal to computers over the network. You can't feed an RF signal into the network and just plug an ordinary TV into another port.
A linux box with MythTV and an adapter card is one way to do it. There are other ways too. A Raspberry Pi has just about enough horsepower to handle the digitisation job.
--
Bernard Peek
snipped-for-privacy@shrdlu.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 06/02/14 13:03, Bernard Peek wrote:

OtOH you can just plug the TV feed into a distribution amplifier and run coax to every room and then get a TV anywhere you want.

cant handle more than one MUX at a time.

--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Digitalisation is done before transmission, all the mythtv end has to do is tune and extract streams.

You can get PCIe cards with 2x DVB-T2 and 2x DVB-S2 tuners, and can take multiple streams from each tuner, that should be enough TV for most people ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 06/02/14 15:00, Andy Burns wrote:

there are 5 muxes in all.
--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Natural Philosopher wrote:

7 in many places now, 8 soon. The principle still stands you can have multiple cards to get even more tuners, diminishing returns, and the interrupt rate gets quite scary, especially for tuners without hardware PID filtering.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 06 Feb 2014 15:18:26 +0000, Andy Burns wrote:

And many places just 3.
I suspect the OP might be happy with a single card and stream over the LAN, retuning the card as required rather than trying to make all the channels available (most of which are a waste of didgits).
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, February 6, 2014 3:41:22 PM UTC, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Is there anything at all actually worth watching on tv these days?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 6 Feb 2014 08:03:37 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Well SWMBO'd has found M*A*S*H, remastered Star Trek and the pilot series of Star Trek... most afternoons and evenings.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, plenty. Plenty of dross too, but that was ever the way.
--
Chris French


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 06/02/2014 15:18, Andy Burns wrote:

Sounding complicated. So, I could take one of these:
http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/dual-digital-dvb-t-pci-e-tv-card-a13ha
and plug the aerial in. I don't see how that could then 'serve' to the network though.
Another option I'd thought about was cable TV. I don't have cable ATM, but Virgin and BT is available in my street. Save on the aerial, but I didn't really want to get into a contract and pay for something that's free.
--
Cheers, Rob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RJH wrote:

Yes, that would receive TV onto that PC (SD but not HD with that particular card)

That's where the mythTV* software comes in, it has a server back-end and a client front-end which can run on different PC(s) dotted around the house, it's not entirely straightforward ... choice of PC, tuners graphics card is important, some Linux knowledge required.
*other software available, some for windows obviously.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I tried MythTV, but it was too much of a palaver to set it up for me.
I ended up using Argus TV
<http://www.argus-tv.com/
Though actually, in the end I've not really bothered with the TV across the network thing. No one really watches TV as broadcast in this house anymore. Except on the odd occasion it happens to be on just as we want to watch the program. It just gets used to record some things.
We'd all much rather watch something we choose at the time we want to. So it's iplayer/4OD etc. or downloads/recordings or DVD's.
The kids fail to see the attraction in a service where you have to watch what someone else has decided to broadcast at a particular time. They prefer to choose their dross :-)
--
Chris French


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What you are wanting to do is have a (wideband) UHF aerial signal fed down CAT6?
Thing is you'd still need a decent aerial. So why not simply have the downlead to where the TV is?
--
*Some people are alive only because it's illegal to kill them *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 06/02/2014 16:31, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Yes, that would be much simpler.
Thing is, every living room has an ethernet point, but no aerial. So I was wondering if one aerial feed could be piped into the ethernet network, and somehow magically be available at each point - thereby allowing TV in each room, with the ease of routing the cable into the cellar (where the network switch is).
Not that I have much/any interest in TV. But I'm told it's not all about me ;-)
--
Cheers, Rob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you are asking whether a UHF signal will physically travel over one of the twisted pairs in a cat 6 cable then yes it will. You need a good signal though. I achieved it over cat 5e cable a few years ago when I wanted to send the tv signal to my computer in the study without having to run additional cables. The tv signal was already in the cellar and there were already spare cat5 cables going to the study an I did not want to affect decoration.
Will not successfully traverse a network switch though!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.