Ethernet Conduit

Just at the point before plastering, so I intend to build in the option to hard wire internet and network connections by installing trunking/conduit from the top of the house (2nd floor) to the bottom (cellar) in one vertical run. I intend to cut a channel into the existing plaster and fit the conduit. The plasterer can then make good - the whole house is getting a skim.
It's going to be easiest to keep all the gubbins (NAS and switch) in the cellar, which would require the capacity for 6 Ethernet cables. I'm using homeplugs at the moment which are fine - I'm after better performance.
What's the best sort to use (round/rectangle section?) and what's the minimum diameter/area I'd need? A link to something would be handy - from say:
http://www.screwfix.com/c/electrical-lighting/trunking-conduit/cat830492
Thanks, Rob
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On Sunday 28 April 2013 08:57 RJH wrote in uk.d-i-y:

20mm oval conduit will take 2 cables including cat5e an aerial.
Oval will probably site in the depth of the plaster avoiding the need to chisel deep chases.
However, for the run you are talking about, you will need backboxes with blanking lids on every floor to both join the conduit and to act as pulling access.
20mm conduit will take 3-4 cables (if you pull them together and have someelse up top feeding them in and keeping the twists under control. This would be the betetr option if it is not impractical.
For total luxury, 4x20mm conduit, double gang boxes on each floor again for pulling points.
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On 28/04/2013 09:22 Tim Watts wrote:

With most motherboards offering gigabit now, and speeds likely to increase in the future, wouldn't it be better to use Cat6?
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On Sunday 28 April 2013 11:18 F wrote in uk.d-i-y:

I'm pretty sure Cat6a will fit 2 to a tube - but I can only personally vouch for Cat5e - which is gigabit.
Or are you proposing wiring for 10 gig?
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On 28/04/2013 11:52 Tim Watts wrote:

My understanding is that 5e is not gigabit, but almost gigabit. The Cat6 I have here is physically, as near as makes no difference, the same size as Cat5e.

No, just going for what is currently fastest at a reasonable cost.
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F wrote:

You needn't worry, Cat5e *is* gigabit. If you have cat6 you can use it, its extra stiffness might help threading it into conduit, but its greater bend radius might hinder too.
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On 28/04/2013 12:08 Andy Burns wrote:

http://www.broadbandutopia.com/caandcaco.html
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F wrote:

So you want to take some random site's word against the IEEE 802.3ab spec that defines 1000base-T to run over Cat5, Cat5e or cat6?
<http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/articleDetails.jsp?tp=&arnumbery8775&contentType=Standards&queryText%3D802.3ab
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On 28/04/2013 12:40, Andy Burns wrote:

<http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/articleDetails.jsp?tp=&arnumbery8775&contentType=Standards&queryText%3D802.3ab

I for one have regularly seen Cat5e achieve gigabit speeds without any difficulty.
In a very "noisy" environment, such as within a server cabinet, I would choose to use Cat6, if feasible. But even there, I have seen Cat5e work OK.
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On 28/04/2013 12:45, polygonum wrote:

You will probably never see a problem with short cables but you may with 100m cables. Not many server cabinets use more than a metre or three.
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On Sunday 28 April 2013 16:18 dennis@home wrote in uk.d-i-y:

<http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/articleDetails.jsp?tp=&arnumbery8775&contentType=Standards&queryText%3D802.3ab

Nonsense.
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<http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/articleDetails.jsp?tp=&arnumbery8775&contentType=Standards&queryText%3D802.3ab

I have a 50 metre or so length of cat5e which I'm sure isn't fully up to standards, I crimped it myself to get the exact length I wanted and to make it easier to thread the cable first. I has worked at 1000Mb/s ever since I installed it.
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On 29/04/2013 08:30, snipped-for-privacy@isbd.net wrote:

Why wouldn't it be up to standards? Didn't you use the correct wire or plugs? I suppose it would be cat 5 as 5e needs tests done but is the same if both of them are done correctly.
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Because I'm not perfect! :-)

As far as I know I did, however there are likely a number of minor issues with it:-
I've probably untwisted too much at the terminations.
It's likely that there are bends less than the specified minimum radius.
It's out in the open air with no extra protection (though the terminations are indoors), it runs from the house to a garage through some trees.
I've never been able to find plugs which specifically state that they are for either solid or stranded conductors so it's quite likely I have this wrong.

Quite, however what I was pointing out is that I believe that cat5[e] has quite a margin of 'performance' even when used at 1000Mb/s.
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Chris Green

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snipped-for-privacy@isbd.net wrote:

Not so likely, you have to go out of your way to get plugs for solid cable.
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On Sunday 28 April 2013 12:45 polygonum wrote in uk.d-i-y:

<http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/articleDetails.jsp?tp=&arnumbery8775&contentType=Standards&queryText%3D802.3ab

+1.
12 years, 1000's gigabit connections over Cat5a, several different sites - including my own house.
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On 28/04/2013 12:40 Andy Burns wrote:

Not random, just one of several.
Gigabit will run on Cat5e, just not as well as it would over Cat6. It's up to the OP to decide what to do: I have no interest other than to offer a point of view that he might want to research/consider.
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F wrote:

You started by saying Cat5e is "almost gigabit".
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Cat5e is, as already mentioned many times, absolutely fine for gigabit ethernet up to 100m.
Cat6 will give you no measurable advantage unless you have a very noisy environment.
Gbit ethernet uses exactly the same frequencies as 100Mbit. The difference is in the coding scheme, the number of pairs used and in the use of full-duplex with echo-cancellation.
However, if you really want to future-proof the system, install some duplex 50um (OM2 or preferably OM3) fibre. Preterminated lengths up to around 25 or 30m with duplex LC connectors can be obtained for a few GBP on eBay. As long as you pull the fibre through before any Cat5e cables, the LC connectors will easily fit down 20mm conduit. 850nm SFP transceivers are very cheap on eBay - sometimes as little as 99p plus postage. Gigabit switches with a pair of SFP sockets are fairly inexpensive now. The low cost ones don't care what make of transceiver you use. Any speed rating of 1Gbit/s or higher will interwork with any other for Gbit ethernet. (I recently tested a 1Gbit/s device together with a 10Gbit/s and they inter-worked fine.)
Single mode fibre gives better bandwidth and range than multimode, but the 1310nm single mode transceivers are generally much more expensive. OM3 multimode fibre will easily give you 10Gbit/s transmission anywhere in even the largest house.
John
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On 28/04/2013 17:21, John Walliker wrote:

Totally over the top. Cat6 cable will support 10Gb up to 40m, and if the runs are longer then Cat 6A will work at 10Gb. Cat5e would give Gb speeds and can be used as a draw wire if in the future the OP needs 10Gb. By the time he gets round to needing the speeds that fibre is required them even OM3 will be outdated.
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