Tip recycling

The bins thread triggered this.
Yesterday I took a large double glazing unit and a smaller sheet of glass to the tip. They have reorganised the segregation, so I asked where to dump them.
"Oh in the scrap metal bin". I queried this asking whether I should just throw them in on top. "Yes".
So now they have a skip almost full of scrap metal mixed in with broken glass.
Does this make sense?
--
Bill

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On 15/03/2019 19:17, Bill wrote:

I wonder if the aluminium will melt before the glass in the smelter or the other way round? Either way, I presume it's a fairly quick way to separate the components and prepare them for being reworked.
Nick
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On Fri, 15 Mar 2019 19:31:10 +0000

Probably gets shredded and put through an inductive separator to remove non-metallics.
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On 15/03/2019 19:54, Rob Morley wrote:

Aha! That would make sense. Ship the shredded aluminium out to the smelter, then?
Nick
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On 15/03/2019 19:17, Bill wrote:

Probably.
There is metal in the DG units. And separating metal and broken glass is trivial.
When it goes for processing, it'll probably all be shredded, then it'll go down a conveyor belt. They'll use a static electromagnetic field to remove all the ferrous metals and then a rotating one to induce currents and hence magnetic fields in the non-ferrous metals, firing them off the side of the belt (see eddy current separator). Result, three streams - one of ferrous metals, one of non-ferrous and the other of non-metals.
SteveW
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Bill wrote:

Magnets will separate the ferrous, coils will induce eddy currents to separate the non-ferrous, the rest is junk.
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On 15/03/2019 19:17, Bill wrote:

They all melt
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No but does anything make sense. If you are a successful glass recycler the glut of glass presumably drives the payment per shipment down so they do not bother to recycle it any more. Same goes for any commodity I'd imagine. the thing is they need to not base this on economics but on energy usage. Brian
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Brian Gaff wrote:

If glass is received sorted into clear/green/amber i.e. from bottle banks it generally has a positive price per tonne, but if it's the remnant glass from a mixed recycling facility, it generally has a negative price per tonne (or a trivial positive price).
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