Tile cutter recommendation please

On the look out for a manual and electric tile cutters for a full bathroom and kitchen renovation job.
Has anyone any experience with any of the Screwfix (http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp?cId 1289&tsv959 and http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp?cId 0893&ts107) and/or Toolstation (http://www.toolstation.com/index.html?code"049 and http://www.toolstation.com/index.html?codeW413 and http://www.toolstation.com/index.html?codeC023) ones?
Also noticed a 30 one at B&Q (-15% until the end of the week).
I already have a very small manual one, but I struggled with it with anything more substantial than 4" thin ones. The manual one is meant to be used for all standard cuts, and the electric one for everything else, i.e. sockets, etc.
Any tips as to what to look for would be much appreciated. Also, how often do the blades need replacing? Should I order additional ones?
Cheers.
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P.S: Looking to spend in the region of <20 for the manual and <40 for the electric one.

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Have the Screwfix 83636 and it has done a conservatory floor and a bathroom with no problems and no broken tiles. At this price it has already paid its way. Still on original blade. The only downside is the way the water holder is retained. It is a bit hit and miss but not too much trouble.
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JoeJoe wrote:

This type of cutter will do probably 95% of your tiles at several times the speed of a tile saw, with no mess, and you have it right next to you. You'll find it easier to use than the cheap plastic types.
>(Amazon.com product link shortened)<
I use an angle grinder and tile cutting disc for the odd rectangular cut-out, but a saw is easier and more accurate.
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I used _exactly_ that cutter for kitchen and bathroom ceramic floor, and bathroom wall tiles, and it worked fine. It only cost me 10, but I can't recall from where -- possibly Tops Tiles.

Same here, but with grit cutting disks which I already had.

The real bugger was the circular hole in the ceramic floor tiles for the soil pipe. I used about 4 jigsaw tile blades (which were intended for wall tiles, not ceramic floor tiles), with the jigsaw mounted upside down in the Workmate, and it was very slow going.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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     snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) writes:

Ah, one thing worth mentioning, the ceramic floor tiles were too strong to be snapped by this cutter. After scoring, I clamped them in the Workmate jaws, and snapped them with a thump from palm of hand.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Surprising. I have a similar type (Rubi) and the long handle exerts a lot of pressure. I've snapped half inch off many a floor tile. Cost a bit more than a tenner though.
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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

I found marking the circle and then cutting straight cuts upto the line on a flatbed electric cutter works well. Once you have the section to be removed looking like the prongs of a fork you can snap off each narrow bit, and leave a quite close approximation to the cutout you wanted.
--
Cheers,

John.

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On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 19:33:08 GMT Stuart Noble wrote :

I bought a cheap diamond disk for my angle grinder and it does a great job trimming tiles, though for really accurate work (mine was mainly L-shaped cutting of tiles going under sockets) I'd rather use a bench cutter.
--
Tony Bryer SDA UK 'Software to build on' http://www.sda.co.uk
Free SEDBUK boiler database browser http://www.sda.co.uk/qsedbuk.htm
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Tony Bryer wrote:

I think the saw is better for floor tiles where the L-shapes show (round doors etc). For walls the grinder is fine, except holding a tile in one hand and grinder in the other isn't ideal. I usually do the shorter of the 2 cuts with the disk and the longer one with the snapper
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You'll find the electric one also very useful for removing that sliver or indeed to make slivers - with care you can get down to about 1/8th of an inch.

Mine has had a deal of use but is still on the original blade. It's a top of the range Plasplugs. Think it's about 50 quid these days. But I had the base model for ages and that was ok. The more expensive one is just better for large floor tiles, etc.
I'd be wary of a steel bed one - unless the plate was stainless.
--
*Why is the time of day with the slowest traffic called rush hour?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 19:40:59 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I used the Plasplugs base model for my bathroom tiling a couple of years ago. Brilliant !! Perfect cutting of the tiles and *so* easy to use - says a lot because I'm not the world's best DIY person :-)
--
Regards,

Hugh Jampton
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I bought a Plasplugs one from B&Q............ looked great on the box as it had a trough round the edge to recycle the water. Unfortunately, it was absolute rubbish and ended up in the Wheelie bin! If you're doing larger tiles, they overhang the "trough" and all the water runs on the floor! The water reservoir would only hold a very small quantity of water or it went everywhere. The guide clamp kept falling apart when you clamped it down. I then bought a Wickes one for about 35 which was great.

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Hugh Jampton wrote:

I have also used one of the low end plasplugs ones (about 32 quid from machinemart) on 10x6" wall tiles. Seemed to work very well - nice smooth cut edges and it kept better control of the water than some.
--
Cheers,

John.

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