Test Meter Recommendation



So your working on those sorts of systems and are that tight to buy a half decent pro meter?. You can get good Fluke meters on e-bay for around 40 to 50 quid sometimes. I managed to get one from a S/H test equipment supplier c/w decent rated leads and fuses etc for that sort of money...
Buggered if I'd use a cheap chinkie one of dubious origin;!...
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Tony Sayer



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wrote:

Buggered if I would use second hand rubbish. I would not feel too happy if my gear didn't come out of a box.
Anyway i'm just being practical. The spec on a Wickes meter is more than adequate for my work. I could destroy it, or a Fluke for that matter in an instant. Whats wrong with the cable on a Wickes meter incidentally? What was wrong with the insulation on a two for four quid Maplin DMM by the way. What is so critical about the rating of the cables and what do I look for when buying same?
The last Fluke I bought was totally useless BTW. I assumed a DMM costing £70-00 or thereabouts would have a current range... Wrong!
Just what as a "pro" meter incidentally. Apart from the price how would you define a meter as being suitable for a professional?
Personally I would deem any meter suitable for a professional if he knew when and how to use it, and got paid for using it. full stop!
On a final point, within reason I can have any meter I wish, but if its not over £100-00 or so I can just call into a trade counter or suchlike.
I think my Wickes meter was £19-00 or so, it does the job as well as a Fluke would. I didn't have to order the thing and wait for delivery and the fact that it does not get looked after, gets dropped, soaked and generally mistreated means that it has outlived my expectations by at least four years.
One other downside of an expensive meter incidentally is having to order a replacement less than a month after unboxing the last one. It has happened!!
AB
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My Fluke is a delight to hold and use - quite unlike any other. Only sort of matters if you appreciate such things. I do.
--
*No I haven't stolen it , I'm just a shit driver*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Thu, 08 Aug 2013 00:29:52 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

:--)
It's whatever grabs yer! I have actually had a few Flukes, they are much like any other meter from a practical point of view. I would say their main advantage is the protection fuse though. It can be damned difficult wrapping a strand of wire round a 20mm fuse after measuring Volts on the mA range. The Fluke wins hands down on that score, the protection fuse is so big, it's a doddle to bypass it!
When I was a young apprentice, before we properly studied "Ohms per Volt" I bought an Avo 7. The meter lasted around two years before I pulled it to bits trying to cure an intermittent Ohms range. The Avo 7 was classed as totally unsuitable for my line of work, not only did I use it, but found it's characteristics very useful for biasing on transistors and suchlike. The meter served me almost as well as the Avo 8 that came later.
It isn't what youve got, it's what you do with it!
AB
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Well least we know where we stand on this..
You can work here<; >
I'll go over there ->>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>:)<

Yes .. nuff said I reckon...

--
Tony Sayer



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Oh dear!, that shows your lack of knowledge of good test equipment. Most all of that is built very well indeed and has a very long service life. There is a healthy market in used equipment ands it gets there for all manner of reasons.

Well we need a meter for field use that can handle measurement of very small currents and voltages and at the same time can check the incoming mains supplies which are very "stiff" and I wouldn't like to trust a 10 quid or otherwise device across that sort of power!. Its quite easy to forget to take the leads of the amps measurement range when your checking three phase supplies;!.

So it didn't measure current at all, which model was that then?..

One that can be calibrated for a start. One that has a good build quality and one that can cope with accidental connection to rather more powerful supplies then what you might in a transistor radio for a start..

I suppose then your version of "professional" differs from mine...

Why?..

--
Tony Sayer


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Saw a line of DMMs that had a simple mechanical device, a disc attached to the range knob, that blocks off the amps and volts lead holes, depending. You either can't stick the leads in on the wrong setting, or the plugged leads block turning the knob to an unsuitable position. One still can set it amps and probe for volts, but not hook up to volts and then set to amps...
Simple and useful idea, wish I'd thought of it.
Thomas Prufer
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On 08/08/2013 11:40, tony sayer wrote:

You can a fair bit from the Cat it claims to match - however I would only believe it if its also certified by a proper testing authority. (I have seen a number of cheap meters that claim CAT II or III for example, but obviously come nowhere close when you look at the internals).
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Cheers,

John.
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On 08/08/2013 11:40, tony sayer wrote:

I expect this will be fine for most DIY use.
http://www.lidl.co.uk/cps/rde/SID-AFE3074F-A8BB34AD/www_lidl_uk/hs.xsl/our-offers-2491.htm?action=showDetail&idH07&ar=3
next week.
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On 08/08/2013 15:19, dennis@home wrote:

Plenty good enough for most non mains work certainly.
For mains tests, it claims to be Cat II and does have a standards body stamp on the front. So for measurements in mains appliances that are connected at least 10m away from the CU it should be safe enough.
(Inadequate for anything in the CU or on a very stiff supply though obviously).
--
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John.
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On Thursday, August 8, 2013 6:09:55 PM UTC+2, John Rumm wrote:

You can measure voltages around the CU perfectly well with just a Cat 1 meter. Just wear thick rubber gloves. ;)
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On 08/08/2013 17:29, snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

Do they protect your face from arc flash injury? (its not the shock risk you need to worry about in these cases!)
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John.
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On Thursday, 8 August 2013 21:45:34 UTC+2, John Rumm wrote:

OK, then how about one of those old fashioned diver's suits - the ones with the brass fishbowl helmet and lead boots? Will that suffice?
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On 09/08/2013 18:47, snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

You might look a bit of a prawn ;-)
Something like:
http://www.coleparmer.co.uk/Product/Optional_Anti_Fog_Inner_Lens_for_Arc_Flash_Face_Shield/OU-86436-17?referred_id482&gclid=CNLFk8a78bgCFcfJtAodB2EAhQ
and a flame retardant jacket is more the norm when working on particularly risky situations.
--
Cheers,

John.
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On 08/08/2013 17:29, snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

Its something to protect you from the leads as they vapourise that you need.
There isn't much chance of anything happening if you know what you are doing.
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On Thursday, August 8, 2013 11:33:48 PM UTC+2, dennis@home wrote:

I'm safe. I've got the same type of rubber gloves that vets use when they're feeling around for calves. :)
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On Thursday, August 8, 2013 4:19:35 PM UTC+2, dennis@home wrote:

Until it goes on the blink. IME these cheapo meters don't last 5 minutes. I've decided to buy a seperate meter for domestic electricity and will cont inue to study what's on the market. In the mean time, to replace my old Whi te Gold meter from Maplin, I popped into my local Maplin store (better the devil you know) and bought one of these by UNI-T. They're a chinese outfit, but they make digital storage scopes so should know what they're doing:
http://www.maplin.co.uk/ut60e-rms-autoranging-digital-multimeter-with-pc-in terface-46458
I do hope it doesn't turn out to be a pile of shit.
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If you hover the mouse over the picture it blows up very clearly. Clearly enough for me to now see that it's NOT auto-ranging on Current. D'oh!
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On Thursday, 8 August 2013 17:19:11 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

y
ng

10

o
ntinue to study what's on the market. In the mean time, to replace my old W hite Gold meter from Maplin, I popped into my local Maplin store (better th e devil you know) and bought one of these by UNI-T. They're a chinese outfi t, but they make digital storage scopes so should know what they're doing:

interface-46458

From the UT60E manual:
( http://www.uni-trend.com/manual2/UT60BCE%20Eng%20Manual.pdf )
This Meter complies with the standards IEC61010: in pollution degree 2, overvoltage category (CAT. III 1000V, CAT. IV 600V;)and double insulation. CAT. III: Distribution level, fixed installation, with smaller transient overvoltages than CAT. IV CAT IV: Primary supply level, overhead lines, cable systems etc.
However internal photos here:
( http://www.flickr.com/photos/22008695@N03/sets/72157625829258944/ )
Show non-HRC fuses.
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Shouldn't there be some certification from an approval body to support that?..
--
Tony Sayer



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