Strange phone wiring

Wanted to move one the phone socket extensions today.
I remove the faceplate, and the wiring inside looked a bit strange.
In the house there is one master socket where the phone cable from the outside is connected with 3 further extensions hard wired to it. All the sockets around the house work fine. Photo of master socket is here:
Two of the extensions are wired on both ends as per usual - i.e. pins and wire colours, but the third one - the one I was looking at today is wired as follows:
At the master socket end: Pin2: White with Blue Pin5: Blue with White All other wires are cut.
On the extension socket end the wiring is as per this photo: http://tinypic.com/r/2z5j2tv/5
Note that this is also the socket used for ADSL and phone.
Is this right (I assume it is, as it works...)?
If I want to use a different face plate, will I have to connect all 4 cables as per the usual way?
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On 19/01/2012 14:05, JoeJoe wrote:

Oops! Master socket photos is here:
http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic+uzr7&s=5
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On Thu, 19 Jan 2012 14:05:34 +0000, JoeJoe wrote:

See the thread entitled "Any experts on telephone wiring?" to save everyone saying the same things again. That extension faceplate with just the two wires presumably has bothe a normal telephone socket and ADSL socket on the face?
These days all you need is the pair with the line on connected at each socket the orange wiring can be left disconnected. Some older phones might not ring but will work otherwise.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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Dave Liquorice wrote:

Use of a master faceplate at each extension solves the ring problem.
Although too many is not strictly kosher as it loads the line up.
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On 19/01/2012 15:28, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

I assume that you refer to the socket connected at the end of the extension in question?
I am planning to replace it with a standard (i.e. on master) one.
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You need to get BT/Openreach to fit a correct NTE5 master socket. That would enable you to isolate the interior wiring. This link tells you more.
http://www.kitz.co.uk/adsl/socket.htm
Peter Crosland
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Peter Crosland wrote:

It looks he *has* one, but someone has swapped one of the extension sockets with the master one.
Since the wiring is only using pins 2/5 now (no problem so long as all phones still ring) it could be improved and put back closer to normal but undoing the swapping, leaving the extensions wired only as 2/5 on the blue pair from the back of the faceplate, and using the orange pair for a dedicated ADSL extension to wherever the master socket is currently ... use an 'RJ11' socket and one of the modified NTE2000 style faceplates from e.g. clarity.
That'll mean only one master socket, unlike the two currently in use, and one ADSL splitter unlike the several currently in use, so stands a decent chance of improving broadband speed.
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On 19/01/2012 18:47, Andy Burns wrote:

Not sure I am following you...
Do you suggest replacing the current master socket (the centre of the star) with one of those socket with a built-in filter, and then use the orange/white pair to propagate the filtered signal to the extensions?
Also, what is the point of replacing the current (non-standard) master socket with one of those official BT master socket with NTE5 faceplate (apart from making it more legit)? I seem to remember a couple of years ago a branch fell on the wire in the street, and the BT guy who replaced it simply connected the new wire into the house into the (non-standard) master socket...

I am planning to remove the 2nd master socket - the one at the end of the extension in the photo, and replace with a standard socket.
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JoeJoe wrote:

yes, remove the non-official master at the centre of the star (presume that's where the drop cable comes in)
put the NTE5 back there (presume it was originally there at one time)
Fit a faceplate ADSL filter to the NTE5, one of these modified versions makes it simpler and allows you to have a remote ADSL socket
http://www.clarity.it/xcart/product.php?productid 134&cat&2&page=1
Connect from the 2/5 pins on the ADSL faceplate (using the blue pair) to all your extensions, leave pin3 disconnected, most phones don't need the separate ring signal, and it leaves you a spare pair for the ADSL extension.
Connect from the A/B pins on the ADSL faceplate (using the now spare orange pair) to an RJ11 socket for the router.

Precisely to make it more legit, you never know when you might get an arsey BT engineer turn up if you log a fault, might as well fix it up now, rather than later.

They won't all turn a blind eye.

All I can say is, that having used a single central ADSL faceplate on about a dozen friends/family installs, it ALWAYS improves the speed over a hotchpoth of master socket, extensions and microfilters that most people seem to accumulate.
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On 19/01/2012 23:02, Andy Burns wrote:

Right, I think I am with you now. Not a problem - I'll put the BT master socket where it should be then.
What if I want to have ADSL RJ11 socket for all the extensions? just in case I'll want to move the modem around the house? Can I replace the faceplate of all the extension sockets with one of those http://www.sourcingmap.com/square-white-rj45-rj11-dual-port-socket-wall-plate-p-98482.html?currency=GBP&utm_source=google&utm_medium=froogle&utm_campaign=ukfroogle , connect pins 2 and 5 as suggested to the master socket, and the the A & B to the A &B of the faceplates?
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On Thu, 19 Jan 2012 23:23:04 +0000, JoeJoe wrote:

The simple answer is you can't, at least not in a plug 'n play sense unless you are wililng to sacrifice some of your ADSL speed.
--
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Dave.




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On 20/01/2012 00:03, Dave Liquorice wrote:

What about using a single gang with 2 modules - one RJ45, one RJ11, for each extension socket?
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JoeJoe wrote:

Can't see that it'd drop much speed, the ADSL side is a straight connection to the line, you've already got x,000 feet of cable between your house and the exchange, another few feet shouldn't hurt much

Should be ok, if you lose speed just disconnect the unused ones until you move stuff around again, presume you won't do it very often?
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On 20/01/2012 00:39, Andy Burns wrote:

Not at all. It is just that with the work involved in running the cables I would rather leave my options open in the future.
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2012 00:26:46 +0000, JoeJoe wrote:

just

sense
The trouble is that the POTS side needs to be filtered and the ADSL side unfiltered. So for each point you need to feed filtered and unfiltered. With your star topography each arm of the star that is unterminated will produce reflections and introduce noise onto the ADSL pair. If you just had a single pair to each extension you would need multiple filters. Both of these are not good for ADSL. You can shift things about by moving the ADSL faceplate and adjusting the wiring.
Not sure why you want an RJ11 and RJ45 faceplate, BT telephone plugs aren't RJ45.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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On 20/01/2012 08:28, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Makes sense. As the chance of moving the modem around in the future is pretty small I'll stick with your suggestion.

My mistake - I meant phone socket.
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On 20/01/2012 08:28, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Pressed send to early...
If I do choose to utilise one pair of the phone cable for ADSL to the modem, how do I go about terminating it, considering that I also need to use the phone pair? Use a BT phone socket module and a RJ11 module in the same face plate (e.g. from Clarity)?
Also, is there anything special about the Clarity master face plate, or is this http://www.kenable.co.uk/product_info.php?products_idP22 identical in terms of performance (at half the price)?
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JoeJoe wrote:

Yes, a BT module and an RJ11 module in two module faceplace, or module module with an RJ45 or two if you're slinging ethernet around at the same time.

Should work, I've only ever used the one that Clarity sell, on the basis that it is made by Pressac, and is the same (barring the extra pins on the IDC connector) as the official BT one.
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2012 09:20:32 +0000, JoeJoe wrote:

ADSL
This is where putting the ADSL modem where the single filter is located then running Cat5 from it to your computer/LAN switch is a good idea. B-)
But if your ADSL modem is also your WiFi access point it might mean that the Wifi is now suboptimal. Having the ADSL modem and Wifi in the same box is not a good idea, the best place for one half is almost certainly not the best place for the other.

You need somthing with a BT socket and RJ11 with seperate wiring for each but no other bits. I'd use one pair for the phone line (probably blue and use blue for all the other extensions) and the orange for the ADSL. If the phone doesn't ring when fed with only a pair I'd either:
Put up with it not ringing but rely on hearing other phones ring. Use a different phone that did ring. Add a C recovered from an old master socket.

How long is a peice of string. This is where the black magic really kicks in. I bought an ADSL faceplate to replace the "soap on rope" BT MF50 filter to tidy things up. I selected the face plate based on good reviews etc. It *did* give better sync rates than the MF50 during the day but at night it was worse and the sync rate would fall back and overall my data rate would end up lower... There are many interacting variables with squeezing the last few kbps out of ADSL, there is no single fix just a collection of actions and things that generally make it better.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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On 20/01/2012 10:01, Dave Liquorice wrote:

I agree and perhaps would address that one day... I currently use a modem router and am happy with the wifi signal around the house.

Agreed.
Will do. I'll buy two separate modules - phone and RJ11 and a double face plate.
If the phone doesn't ring when fed with only a pair I'd

No problem with ringing - already disconnected pins 3 and 4.

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