sprinklers in kitchen



friends of mine had their dishwasher catch fire overnight.
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wrote

But its unlikely to burn the house down.
Alarms in the kitchen make a lot more sense than sprinklers.
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On 18/06/2012 23:03, charles wrote:

I think Rod would say that is impossible if it's "standard compliant", and it would be a "foolish statement" to suggest otherwise! :-)
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On 18/06/2012 21:14, ss wrote:

Quite right. Thank God I bought a deep fat fryer years ago. I remember coming in one night, fancying some chips and then waking up in the morning to a strong smell of frying. I'd obviously felt tired and gone to bed forgetting that I'd turned the fryer on - probably saved my life.

Alarms should be fine for night time too. A sprinkler system would be more use for when you have gone out.
SteveW
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wrote:

Excellent. Depending on price, it would be possible to mount one of those under a domestic hood.

Of course, which is why I'd only fit a mist type sprinkler in a kitchen.
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wrote

<
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJz109_qgFY

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Alan
news2009 admac myzen co uk
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I wouldn't myself given that fat fires are by far the biggest problem with kitchen fires that are more than just a nuisance and that that's the last thing you should use on a fat fire.

That's very arguable if you don't heat fat at all and are a smoker.

Nope, very easy to do.

Just basic plumbing.
I wouldn't do it tho.
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On 18/06/2012 21:26, Rod Speed wrote:

Ok a lot of logic in the various answers and thanks for that. This is my situation which is probably OTT but real enough. I am getting on a bit, nearing retirement age so not as agile as I used to be. I dont use a deep fat fryer or chip pan the nearest is a frying pan. I smoke but not in the house, outdoors only. With age I am developing a greater fear of fire and my wife is much worse.
I also had an incident when the plumber was doing some work under the kitchen floor and space was very tight, a plastic membrane(assumed, may have been some other material) caught fire under the floor, that in itself was not a problem as he had some water in a bucket and a connected hose just in case but I couldnt believe how quickly the smoke filled the room and it got me thinking as if he had went to his van at the wrong time I could see how this could have spread rapidly.
As previously said I have smoke/fire alarms etc but just thought is it worth adding a sprinkler.
Age is a curse as it makes us feel more vulnerable. :-(
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ss wrote:

Remember, that when a domestic fire takes hold, the heat can reach 650C (1200F) and you can be wide awake in another room (let alone fast asleep) and not be aware that fire has started until things start popping with the heat - when you hear that, and you decide to have a look and open the door to the room without thinking...that's when things really 'flare' up (no pun intended here).
If you are genuinely concerned, nip down to your local (manned) fire station and ask them to explain the process of combustion and smoke (smoke usually being the killer) with the options of preventing such fire, warning of one and how to survive the thing.
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On 18/06/2012 23:09, Woodworm wrote:

Thanks woodworm , appreciate the advice.
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On Mon, 18 Jun 2012 23:09:12 +0100, Woodworm wrote:

Aye, anything up to a small explosion as the oxygen in the air outside rushes into the oxygen depleted room and all the very hot things that couldn't burn due to lack of oxygen suddenly can and do...
If you even half suspect a fire behind a closed door feel it first, if it's warm/hot don't open it. Don't grab the handle either, particullary if metal as it may be very hot. Metal conducts heat far better than a timber door and door handles are joined to each other by a metal bar.

I think most fire services offer a free Fire Prevention visit where they will go through your home checking for fire hazards and risks and advise accordingly. Don't know if they also give advice about what to do should you get caught by a fire. Simple things can be life savers, like not opening doors, keeping low by crawling.
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True.

I'm rather older than that.

I'm still very agile.

I also roast lamb particularly with a decent layer of fat in the pan for the potatoes. Not sure that's going to be a fire problem tho given that the oven should stop a fat fire.

OK, certainly worth doing something, particularly if either of you are getting a bit absent minded etc now.
I never have been myself and have only run out of petrol in the car just the once, when I had picked up a couple of 5 week old Alsatian puppys from the capital city and was driving home with them in a VW beetle with the passenger's front seat removed with the dogs on that floor on newspaper.

Sure, there is always some risk in that sort of situation.
I still prefer a decent alarm system and something to use on fires that look like a minor problem and just get out of the house safely with a major fire tho. My place has massive great 8'x8' patio doors in all major rooms except the bathrooms and toilets and 5 of those in the main room itself, and quarry tile floors, and leather upholstery on the armchairs etc, so fire just isnt a problem in my case.
And I don't panic when something like a fire happens either.

In my opinion they are really only much of an improvement for fires that happen when the house is unoccupied.

And it can be a real problem fire risk wise if you end up being very absent minded and can leave hot fat heating up till it catches fire too.
But sprinklers are the last thing you need in that situation.
The video from the fire goon was interesting tho. I should check that claim that Canada hasn't had any fire deaths since sprinklers were mandated. We certainly do get some, mostly little kids setting fire to their bedrooms tho.
Sprinklers certainly would help there and I might even consider adding sprinklers to kids bedrooms myself if I actually had any little kids.
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ss wrote:

sprinklers are appropriate for unmanned areas. Far better to get a POWDER extinguisher.
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I've just mentally designed a fireproof kitchen in my mind. Basically the cook has to have an oxygen mask and the room itself ois filled with an inert gas. Ingress and exit is through an airlock. chuckle.
Brian
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Its not that bad when you realise that few kitchen fires are life threatening.
All you really have to do is ban cooking in deep hot fat or just organise a situation where the fat cant get too hot and ensure that there arent naked flames to get it alight etc.

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I'd have thought that any sprinkler there would need to cut the electricity before it started to spray water everywhere?
Brian
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On 19/06/2012 08:32, Brian Gaff wrote:

An RCD would be a good alternative.
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Fredxx wrote:

Rod Cranium Detacher?
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I remember reading that in some US states sprinkler systems are mandatory in new build houses, and that there has never been a fatality due to fire in a sprinkler equipped house. False activation is virtually nonexistent, and they extinguish fires quickly so there is less fire damage and less water damage than would otherwise be the case. Not sure of the economics of retrofitting them, but for new build houses they are a fantastic idea.
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On 18/06/12 20:41, ss wrote:

A sprinkler over a chip pan fire? Good idea?
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